LumberJocks

Shellac (Zinsser SealCoat) for sealing in odor?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by paxorion posted 04-24-2014 03:22 AM 6713 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1508 days


04-24-2014 03:22 AM

Topic tags/keywords: humor spray gun finishing shellac

My wife found a chest of drawers on Craigslist that had the retro design elements she wanted our daughter’s bedroom to have. We are planning on painting the entire dresser, but have been struggling to get rid of the musty smell that permeates the dresser before embarking on the stripping and priming journey. After a bit of talking and brainstorming, she suggested that:
  1. I pull the trigger and buy a spray gun, so that I can (re)finish the project in a more reasonable amount of time
  2. Coat the entire dresser (inside and out) with a odor blocking primer so that we can nip the problem in the bud

Now first off, I’d like to celebrate with the LJ community, the fact that my wife is telling me to buy a tool (clap clap). Second (on a more serious note), I wanted to hear about some sort of topcoat that can seal in the odor. We have been looking at Zinsser BIN primer as a possible primer for this job, given that it is advertised as being able to seal in odors. I’m not too crazy about the prospect of buying a primer for just one job and started wondering. Given that Zinsser BIN is a shellac-based primer, is it shellac that gives the primer the odor blocking capacity? And if so, would maybe SealCoat (which I currently have on hand) be a viable alternative for sealing in odor in preparation for a prime (with Zinsser 123) and paint finish?

-- paxorion


13 replies so far

View WoodenSoldier's profile

WoodenSoldier

161 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 04-24-2014 03:43 AM

I did the exact same thing over the summer. I bought a pine dresser on craigslist that smelled like it had been used as an ash tray. I thought the smell would go away on its own if I left it to air out for a few days but it didn’t change so I sprayed inside and out with Bullseye shellac and then painted over it. Smells fine now, if not a little sweet from the shellac.

-- Create something everyday.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2433 days


#2 posted 04-24-2014 06:20 AM

Should work. I have used shellac to seal in odor with success.
And it serves well as a barrier layer between otherwise incompatible finishes.

An alternate solution is ozone treatment.
Companies who salvage and recover fire and flood damaged property use this process.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2039 days


#3 posted 04-24-2014 08:33 AM

Yep, it’ll work.
BIN is pretty much shellac with white pigment added, so sealcoat will work fine.

Kudos on the spray gun go-ahead. Any models in particular have your interest?

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4451 posts in 3423 days


#4 posted 04-24-2014 01:45 PM

I have used Seal Coat on drawers (for antiques-not my underwear) with good success.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View WibblyPig's profile

WibblyPig

168 posts in 2737 days


#5 posted 04-24-2014 01:56 PM

My wife’s old boss’s house caught on fire and to seal in the smoke smell, they had guys go up with 5 gallon pump sprayers filled with Zinsser BIN (alcohol based). They just pumped it up and doused everything up in the attic. He said that when he went up there, he couldn’t smell a thing and it was all nice and white.

If you’re painting it anyways, I’d probably just use the BIN – it will give you a white primer base and cleanup is going to be the same.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

View Ted's profile

Ted

2785 posts in 1674 days


#6 posted 04-24-2014 02:44 PM

I use BIN to seal smoke odor and smoke stains when painting apartments. Even the fussiest new tenants never guess that a smoker had lived there previously.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1508 days


#7 posted 04-24-2014 02:52 PM

Nitewalker – I haven’t settled on the HVLP to get yet, but I am thinking on the low end, either the Harbor Freight or Rockler HVLP, and on the mid range, possibly the Earlex Spray Station HV5500. I’ll probably start another thread about it when I’ve finished the repair work.

For anyone who has advocated for BIN, I totally see your point on using a product that can knock out two birds (sealing odor and priming) with one stone. I’m not too keen on spending 20-$40 to buy BIN primer just for this (type of) project vs. spending the same money for SealCoat (which I use quite regularly), followed by primer I have on hand and need to use up. We have a huge problem of half-used cans of paint/finish that I don’t want to add to.

I guess my question is better phrased as, does BIN primer have an odor blocking advantage over SealCoat?

-- paxorion

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#8 posted 04-24-2014 03:09 PM

I don’t think so, they both work equally well for that purpose. Another thing to keep in mind is that BIN (to me, at least) is less easy to spray. The pigment (again, IME) tends to clog the nozzle, and it’s very hard to keep in suspension while your spraying. I suspect others have had a lot more luck with it than I, but I doubt I’ll try spraying BIN again.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

589 posts in 1537 days


#9 posted 04-24-2014 03:19 PM

Pax – you could have the dresser treated with ozone. If you call Servpro or a similar company that specializes in smoke and odor clean up/control after a fire, they would likely be able to set the dresser in an ozone chamber for a couple of days. Newer ozone generators do a helluva good job getting rid of odor.

I mentioned Serpro only because there’s one in just about every city.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1508 days


#10 posted 04-24-2014 04:13 PM

Hmm, interesting idea. I’m not sure if I want to spend the money on treating the odor for a CL dresser but will pocket the idea for any future odor removal

-- paxorion

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2039 days


#11 posted 04-24-2014 06:00 PM

Yes, the sealcoat will definitely work. It even has instruction on the can for using as an odor sealer. I think it’s just apply two coats.

@Fred: I usually thin the BIN a bit before spraying. That helps with clogging.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View mlv's profile

mlv

1 post in 532 days


#12 posted 06-23-2015 12:41 AM

I have an odor issue after drywalls were replaced in my master bedroom. My suspicion is that the odor is coming from the Glidden Low odor 0 VOC paint. Drywall was bought in the HD, mud was applied and sanded after it was dry. Then texture was applied (orange peel). After it was dry the painter used KILZ 2 (from HD) and painted in couple of days. After 2.5 weeks of ventillation I still can move into the bedroom… I am thinking to hire a different painter and apply new texture, use PVA primer on the top after it is dry and then apply some Behra Ultra or may be SW, whichever is not explicitly saying 0 VOC, which turns to be something not exactly odorless. Please advise.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1508 days


#13 posted 06-23-2015 01:37 PM

Since an old thread of mine was revived, for anyone who is interested, I did go with the full on shellac sealing (BIN on the outside, Sealcoat on the inside). Worked like a charm. Here’s the completed project.

My daughter has only tried to climb up the dresser twice to reach the toys up top.


I have an odor issue after drywalls were replaced in my master bedroom. My suspicion is that the odor is coming from the Glidden Low odor 0 VOC paint. Drywall was bought in the HD, mud was applied and sanded after it was dry. Then texture was applied (orange peel). After it was dry the painter used KILZ 2 (from HD) and painted in couple of days. After 2.5 weeks of ventillation I still can move into the bedroom… I am thinking to hire a different painter and apply new texture, use PVA primer on the top after it is dry and then apply some Behra Ultra or may be SW, whichever is not explicitly saying 0 VOC, which turns to be something not exactly odorless. Please advise.

- mlv

Don’t know what the situation there is, if there’s still some off-gassing or slow curing of your paint/primer. I usually work with acrylic (General Finishes) or latex (mostly Valspar, some Sherwin Williams) paint. Has the manufacturer said anything about it?

-- paxorion

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com