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Another Cherry blotching question

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Forum topic by RockyTopScott posted 04-23-2014 11:54 PM 605 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


04-23-2014 11:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cherry finishing

I like to use BLO, mineral spirits and poly in equal parts and wet sand the finish using 400 grit after sanding to 220 or 320.

The reason I like this finish is it is virtually foolproof and produces an incredible feel when you touch the wood….I find people just like the way it feels.

I just have not found a good way to keep the blotching down in cherry using this method. Applying shellac or other preconditioner before and then wet sanding seems to defeat the purpose.

I have found that raising the grain with water between grits help some in reducing blotch…at least it seems that way to me.

Does anyone know a good way to reduce the blotch and still allow me to use this method? Do you have any good pictures of the outcome?

thanks RTS

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell


13 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3549 posts in 1557 days


#1 posted 04-24-2014 12:02 AM

Thin shellac sealcoat 3 parts denatured alcohol to 2 parts sealcoat and wipe it on with a rag. Let it dry and scuff sand with 320 grit or finer soft sanding sponge. Clean with a cheese cloth, and apply your oil.
That ratio really works well under oil based stains. Eliminates blotching, yet allows the oil to color the wood.

The only catch is you have to wipe off the excess oil every half hour until it dries.
Here are some pictures of oil based stain over a 3:2 shellac sealcoat. http://lumberjocks.com/pintodeluxe/blog/38333

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1281 posts in 713 days


#2 posted 04-24-2014 12:08 AM

I can attest to pinto’s 3:2 mixture. He told me about it and I used it on my wife’s five drawer dresser. Not a single blotch. Give that one a try

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


#3 posted 04-24-2014 12:10 AM

I can apply my oil blend and still wet sand it by hand using the 3:2 mixture?

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

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Kaleb the Swede

1281 posts in 713 days


#4 posted 04-24-2014 12:13 AM

As long as it’s a dewaxed shellac it should be fine. I used waterlox on that finish, if I am not mistaken is an oil finish. Maybe check with the finishing gurus, they would have a better thought than me. Hope this helps Oh yeah picture.

http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictures/projects/442302-438x.jpg?1386441196

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


#5 posted 04-24-2014 12:19 AM

Very Nice Swede, I will give it a try. Thanks to you as well Pinto.

I have some sealcoat but have not diluted in the 3:2 ratio. It will be the first method I do tomorrow after work.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View RRBOU's profile

RRBOU

112 posts in 1036 days


#6 posted 04-24-2014 12:49 AM

I think you want to thin the shellac and apply, then scuff sand in-between. Then use either your finish or the waterlox. But do not skip the shellac coat. The shellac seals the wood slightly to prevent the blotching.

-- If guns cause crime all of mine are defective Randy

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Gixxerjoe04

302 posts in 320 days


#7 posted 04-24-2014 12:58 AM

I assume this would work on maple as well? Was about to start a thread asking about preventing blotching on maple.

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


#8 posted 04-24-2014 01:17 AM

I get your drift Joe..i am asking specifically about wet sanding, but I understand your comment

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112805 posts in 2321 days


#9 posted 04-24-2014 05:42 AM

It’s the shellac that’s helping control the blotching not the wet sanding unless your sanding to a very high grit in the 400-800 grit range.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


#10 posted 04-24-2014 10:30 AM

Jim,

What i am going to try is sanding to 320’, apply the shellac, scuff sand with 320 then wet sand with 400, maube 600.

I was under the impression when I did the wet sand it would eliminate the blotch control of the shellac coat (s).

RTS

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View RRBOU's profile

RRBOU

112 posts in 1036 days


#11 posted 04-24-2014 11:06 AM

I am not the authority on finishing by any means but, I think that what you are accomplishing by wet sanding is filling the pours of the wood with very small saw dust and finish. This will still be accomplished by wet sanding the coats of finish applied over the shellac. If you sand all the shellac off then you defeat the purpose of applying it in the first place. One of the reasons that shellac seals the wood without blotching is the speed at which it dries. It is not absorbed by the wood fibers as deeply. This coat then slows the absorption of the other coats. This minimizes blotching.

-- If guns cause crime all of mine are defective Randy

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


#12 posted 04-24-2014 12:26 PM

Thanks Randy…this is my suspicion. I may not be able to have it both ways as in less blotching and the wet sand feel I desire.

I know as the cherry ages and darkens the blotching becomes less noticeable (learned that in CN’s “Simply Put” book).

I will just have to experiment and see what the limitations are. I am going to try and get some wood this weekend to start some tables for the living room. I am trying to resolve this before I settle on the final finish technique.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

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guitchess

82 posts in 2452 days


#13 posted 04-24-2014 01:24 PM

I am assuming we’re talking about natural finish blotch. So, I’m not sure if my tip will work. I haven’t tried it without stain. It’s based on the same idea as Charles Neil’s blotch control. It is basically glue sizing. I use 1 part Titebond II to 6 parts water. Wipe, spray, or mop it on. Let it dry. Then sand it with 320 and repeat.

This treatment works wonderfully under stain/dye. It also has the added benefit of locking the grain before the first coat of finish.

I too, love the 3 part finish. The mix I use even has a pleasant aroma, tung oil, turpentine, and poly.

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