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Working with Aleppo Pine

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Forum topic by Ty Moser posted 04-21-2014 04:44 AM 1458 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ty Moser

81 posts in 999 days


04-21-2014 04:44 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plaques sap pitch pitch pocket aleppo pine aleppo pine milling finishing

I recently found a local saw mill in Phoenix that was started by two retired guys. Long story short, we were all born and raised in the same small town in Idaho and are getting along quite well.

They acquired ~90 Aleppo Pine trees from a golf course after a nasty storm blew them all down and would like to make some plaques. I got a single board for a project and had enough left over to make a plaque. After planing it down, sanding and finishing it off with hard wax it was super pretty. However, I left it in my truck for a few days and the hot temperature drew out a decent amount of sap/pitch. I don’t know if this would happen if it stayed a normal temperature but I don’t want to risk it.

I showed them the end results and they gave me 5 more boards to make as many as I can. (For a small fee..) Now I’m trying to come up with a game plan to manage the sap/pitch pockets. I was considering planing and cutting everything to size and then placing in the sun for a few days to get out what I can before sanding and finishing. (This is where your ideas can help!!)

FYI, this is the Aleppo pine after planing. (Not sanded or finished.)

-- Check out my projects at https://www.monolocoworkshop.com or at https://www.youtube.com/user/trmoser/videos


10 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1944 posts in 1450 days


#1 posted 04-22-2014 12:46 PM

Those are pretty boards with a lot of sap. One treatment is to clean off as much as you can and then bake the boards which will crystallize the sap. You could try a Google search for heat treatment of saw and find some directions.

View drjohno's profile

drjohno

1 post in 390 days


#2 posted 11-10-2015 02:50 PM

Hi Ty, did you find any solutions to working with Aleppo pine? I’m considering making a workbench with an Aleppo slab. I found the same lumber mill in Phoenix and I also spend a lot of time in north Idaho (Bonners Ferry, Sandpoint). Thanks

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 685 days


#3 posted 11-10-2015 02:58 PM

Back before I got my sawmill, I talked with those guys because I was thinking of taking some logs to have them milled.
Really nice guys and they love what they do.
I’ve been following their progress and they’re really doing a lot to grow their business.

I have milled some wood that looks like that but I wasn’t sure what kind of pine it was. Does it have a very strong pine scent to it? Someone from this website turned some bowls from this wood and he also baked it in the oven, but still had some problems sanding, but nothing has leaked out from the finished product.

View Ty Moser's profile

Ty Moser

81 posts in 999 days


#4 posted 11-10-2015 03:16 PM

Hey drjohno, The Wine Glass Bar Sawmill installed a kiln maybe half a year ago so anything since then should be good. The only real I know of is to set the pitch which requires temperatures around 150°. If you have some Aleppo pine that hasn’t been kiln dried then you can setup some kind of make shift solar kiln (not so good now that AZ is cooling down..) or you can take it down to the sawmill and they’ll probably be more than happy to help you out. (For a small price.)

AZWoody, where in AZ are you and what kind of sawmill did you get? I’m in N. Chandler and have been running a chainsaw mill with a 59” bar. As for the Aleppo pine, it does have a fairly strong pine smell and I would think that if the turner you mentioned baked his bowel in the oven, he probably set all the pitch which would probably be the solution to leaky sap and the problem of rougher sanding..

-- Check out my projects at https://www.monolocoworkshop.com or at https://www.youtube.com/user/trmoser/videos

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AZWoody

693 posts in 685 days


#5 posted 11-10-2015 03:24 PM

I’m an hour east of Yuma on I-8.

I have a harbor freight bandsaw samill which I have done some modifications to get a little better capacity, etc.

I would love to have a large bar chainsaw as well. I have a couple logs that are just a bit too big for my sawmill.

View Ty Moser's profile

Ty Moser

81 posts in 999 days


#6 posted 11-10-2015 05:16 PM

I didn’t even know that Harbor Freight had a bandsaw mill.. What’s the capacity?

-- Check out my projects at https://www.monolocoworkshop.com or at https://www.youtube.com/user/trmoser/videos

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 685 days


#7 posted 11-10-2015 07:58 PM



I didn t even know that Harbor Freight had a bandsaw mill.. What s the capacity?

- Ty

I believe originally it’s around 20” wide capacity but I had the guides cut and re welded to get me I think around 24” now.
I also changed out the motor to a larger one.

Overall, the sawmill is one of the gems. If you can get a 20% coupon and then get it when it’s on sale, you’ll save a lot of money over any of the others.
It is one of those HF tools I would recommend to anyone looking to get into milling.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4822 posts in 2510 days


#8 posted 11-10-2015 08:41 PM

http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=saw+mill

Description
Cut logs and lumber down to size with this portable saw mill featuring a powerful 301cc gas engine. The portable saw mill can handle logs up to 20 in. diameter and flat stock up to 20 in. wide. This dependable portable saw mill is designed to be used with regular unleaded gasoline.

Maximum log diameter: 20 in.
Maximum board width: 20 in.
Blade size: 1-1/4 in. W x 144 in. L x 0.048 in. T
Blade speed: 3279 FPM
Overweight Item subject to $89.95 additional Freight Charge
An additional lift-gate charge may apply.

This item can only be shipped within the 48 contiguous states via Standard Ground Shipping. In order to return this item for a refund or replacement, all fuel must first be drained.

-- Bert

View TJSWOOD's profile

TJSWOOD

1 post in 375 days


#9 posted 11-25-2015 01:20 PM

I also have some large slabs of this pine and have had it stacked and stickered on my outside patio for over a year. The same guys you mentioned milled my wood. How do I know when it is ready to be used. I intend to make a kitchen counter top. The slabs vary from 4 to 5 ft long and are about 8 to 10 quarter. Or does anyone know where I can rent a moisture meter?

View Ty Moser's profile

Ty Moser

81 posts in 999 days


#10 posted 11-25-2015 05:07 PM



I also have some large slabs of this pine and have had it stacked and stickered on my outside patio for over a year. The same guys you mentioned milled my wood. How do I know when it is ready to be used. I intend to make a kitchen counter top. The slabs vary from 4 to 5 ft long and are about 8 to 10 quarter. Or does anyone know where I can rent a moisture meter?

- TJSWOOD

The rule of thumb is one year per inch but that is generally a very conservative estimate. Since you’re in Phoenix and you got it over a year ago and we had a pretty hot summer, you might be getting pretty close. If you area able to transport it, you might be able to bring it back to the mill or another wood supplier and have them test it. If not, there are some cheaper meters but they generally have less accuracy.

Another method to find out your moisture is the oven method where you cut off a sample piece, weigh it, stick it in the oven to completely dry it and then re-weigh it. This can be a pretty involved process but the full details can be found here: http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/5190/MoistureContentocr.pdf

-- Check out my projects at https://www.monolocoworkshop.com or at https://www.youtube.com/user/trmoser/videos

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