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Forum topic by doitforfun posted 04-20-2014 03:31 AM 836 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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doitforfun

154 posts in 261 days


04-20-2014 03:31 AM

I’m making a lamp out of red oak. I usually use natural finish danish oil but I’m out. I do have linseed oil but I never tried it on oak. Will that being out the red color like the danish oil does? What should I expect?

-- Brian in Wantagh, NY


11 replies so far

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1210 posts in 1090 days


#1 posted 04-20-2014 03:48 AM

Brian, Danish oil is nothing more than varnish resins, solvent, linseed oil and driers, so you should get about the same look from linseed oil alone. Your top coat may affect the color somewhat though. If you seal the oil with a clear shellac and top coat with lacquer, it should be pretty close.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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Mark

424 posts in 628 days


#2 posted 04-20-2014 04:09 AM

Brian. Linseed oil is a bastard to dry. And it’s kinda sticky as well. Danish oil / teak oil/ whatever oil. They’re all the same. Basically boiled linseed oil to give the wood depth, a bit of varnish to give the finish a bit of strength and thinners to speed up the drying. That said “Teak Oil”is my go to finish, with a water born varathain top coat. But the deal is. If your going to spend the time and effort to create a project…get the right stuff (your preference) to finish it. MTCW

-- Mark

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doitforfun

154 posts in 261 days


#3 posted 04-20-2014 10:45 AM

Yeah danish oil does t take days to dry. I’ll try mixing some linseed oil and mineral spirits and see how that comes out on some scrap first. If I can finish assembling and sanding today I can finish it tonight and top coat it next weekend LOL.

Usually with the danish oil I apply it and if the humidity is high it won’t dry in 3 days so I wash it with mineral spirits to dry it up. The weather is nice today. Maybe I’ll try that washing after one day.

-- Brian in Wantagh, NY

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Finisherman

203 posts in 503 days


#4 posted 04-20-2014 06:56 PM

You can add some Japan drier to your boiled linseed oil. This will help it to cross-link and cure more quickly. Japan drier is available at most paint stores like Sherwin-Williams. Follow the instructions on the container as per the amount of drier to add. You might also try substituting VM&P naphtha for the mineral spirits. This will flash off quickly, though it won’t make the oil cure any faster. In any case, be sure to keep each coat of oil thin and allow plenty of time for it to cure (possibly weeks) before you top coat. Finally, if you opt for a waterborne finish, seal in the cure oil with a coat or two of dewaxed shellac to avoid any potential adhesion problems.

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doitforfun

154 posts in 261 days


#5 posted 04-20-2014 07:04 PM

Thanks for the top about Japan drier. I’ve read about that stuff before but it didn’t come to mind before you mentioned it. My linseed oil is actually raw, not boiled. I bought it a long time ago when I built a bicycle wheel. It’s old fashioned thread locker which I used on the spoke nipples. I have a feeling this stuff is going to require Japan drier.

-- Brian in Wantagh, NY

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Nobodyhome

4 posts in 288 days


#6 posted 04-20-2014 07:35 PM

Raw linseed oil is not a good choice. Much better to wait a few extra days and pick up another can of Danish oil or other suitable finish. It will be well worth the wait.

-- John

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Finisherman

203 posts in 503 days


#7 posted 04-20-2014 08:08 PM

Brian:

I’ll second what John is saying. Raw linseed oil doesn’t cure worth “a hill of beans” to put it politely. You’d be much better off buying another can of Danish oil and leave the raw linseed oil in the can (or use it to start a bonfire). It’s likely that raw linseed oil won’t be fully cured in time for your grandchildren’s weddings. Happy Easter everyone!

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doitforfun

154 posts in 261 days


#8 posted 04-20-2014 08:49 PM

Just picked up some danish oil. Thanks again for the info. Better safe than sorry.

-- Brian in Wantagh, NY

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SCOTSMAN

5361 posts in 2238 days


#9 posted 04-20-2014 09:37 PM

You’d be much better off buying another can of Danish oil and leave the raw linseed oil in the can (or use it to start a bonfire).

MY SENTIMENTS EXACTLY Well said buddy

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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CessnaPilotBarry

890 posts in 763 days


#10 posted 04-21-2014 12:20 AM

For a lamp, I’d probably consider spray bombs of lacquer, shellac, or poly, depending on the final look I was seeking.

Or, I’d wipe on a few coats of Danish Oil, wait a week or two, then rub it down with steel wool and wax. Colored wax is optional, a dark wax can create a nice look on natural red oak, as it lodges in the open pores.

Before I did anything to the lamp, I’d sand some scrap to the same grit as the lamp, try the entire finish on the scrap, and make sure I liked the final look. If you’ve got time to use a finish schedule that you’ve never done before on your project, you’ve got time to build the entire project again if it doesn’t work out.

-- It's all good, if it's wood...

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Mainiac Matt

3992 posts in 982 days


#11 posted 04-21-2014 12:36 AM

I did my daughter’s Red Oak hope chest with cherry colored Danish oil and it turned out great.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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