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Shipping a glass tabletop

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Forum topic by MalcolmLaurel posted 04-18-2014 09:27 PM 614 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MalcolmLaurel

216 posts in 345 days


04-18-2014 09:27 PM

I’m building a couple of coffee tables with glass tops. I haven’t ordered the glass yet, but I’ll get them cut at the local glass shop… they’ll be irregular shapes, cut to my pattern. The problem is shipping the glass if I sell the tables online. Has anybody ever shipped a large piece (roughly 3’ triangular, the other is smaller)? Can a piece that size be crated safely? I have seen glass tables sold without the glass so the buyer can get the glass locally, but without the top I can’t photograph the table. If I buy the glass, I would have to sell only locallly. Thoughts?

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com https://www.etsy.com/shop/MalcolmLaurel


12 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2370 days


#1 posted 04-18-2014 10:02 PM

I’ve thought about it. I know big furniture companies do it
but they are running truckloads around and have economy of scale.

Maybe the glass shop people can advise you.

It may increase shipping costs to the extent that it will
harm the sale. That’s something to consider.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1592 posts in 612 days


#2 posted 04-18-2014 11:12 PM

I’m working on a drawing for you. My company ships and receives glass frequently in crates.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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lateralus819

1592 posts in 612 days


#3 posted 04-18-2014 11:23 PM

It’s pretty straight forward. The little squares between the two pieces are Cork with adhesive. http://www.walmart.com/ip/35911229?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227024116393&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=40084510141&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=70080258541&veh=sem

Couldn’t quickly find squares, but either way, they’re a low tac padding. They stick and will offer security between the two pieces.

The front panels has 1/2” furring strips, with some foam padding spray glued to them. You’ll also want to secure the panes to the carcass itself, wether it’s nylon band or whichever you find works for you. You’ll want to pad the back/sides/bottom as well.

Probably leaving details out, but if this looks like something that will suit you, feel free to pm me and i can give you the sketchup drawing and give more assistance if necessary. Shipping and handling glass is scary, especially if it’s thick.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

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MalcolmLaurel

216 posts in 345 days


#4 posted 04-19-2014 12:04 AM

Hmmm, yeah, vertical just like the glass trucks… as long as it’s kept vertical. Wonder what it wold cost to ship, with the table base in the crate as well?

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com https://www.etsy.com/shop/MalcolmLaurel

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1592 posts in 612 days


#5 posted 04-19-2014 12:22 AM

Honestly, I’d make two crates if it was me. That glass will probably cost a bit to replace. Trucking companies usually aren’t too kind to crates. Luckily with that vertical they can’t stack on it. Your call.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 671 days


#6 posted 04-19-2014 01:24 AM

insure the hell out of it and hit it with a hammer. Now that I have that out of my system, I would sell it without glass if you are shipping.as for pix you could have a piece of cheap plexy cut. Just 1 thought

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2370 days


#7 posted 04-19-2014 01:30 AM

If it’s in a frame maybe a piece of plexiglass with a thin
layer of glass on top would look ok for photos and
be acceptable to take to shows. Supply real
plate glass for a local buyer or ship without.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2542 posts in 2464 days


#8 posted 04-19-2014 03:40 AM

glass is surprisingly tough. Especially tempered glass.

I wouldn’t use a non tempered glass for a coffee table/end table, as you know it will get hit/stuff will be dropped on it.

same issue for glass shelves, if it has stuff sitting on it – make sure it is tempered glass.

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1737 posts in 443 days


#9 posted 04-19-2014 03:50 AM

You don’t have to hit it with a hammer yourself, if you ship it UPS, they’ll do that for you and then claim it wasn’t packaged correctly. It doesn’t matter if it’s a Faberge egg or a 50lb anvil, they will find a way to destroy it!

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DrDirt

2542 posts in 2464 days


#10 posted 04-21-2014 02:06 PM

Yeti – - something like this?

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

103 posts in 192 days


#11 posted 06-02-2014 06:22 AM

If you want something to stay upright, you’ll have to ship it LTL (less-than-truckload) freight, on a pallet/skid. I don’t know if the shipping cost is “worth it” for the item you’re selling. Prepare to pay (or charge your client) in the range of $150-250 for shipping, depending on distance, and whether you have a freight dock available to ship from. Liftgate service will add typically $50-70 to the cost, and most people don’t have a freight dock or access to one to receive a shipment so they will need that.

I didn’t include your cost to build the crate/pallet, it could be nearly nothing if you have a construction stapler and some junk 1-by material laying around.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1683 days


#12 posted 06-02-2014 04:24 PM

Why not let the customer buy the glass at a local shop? The customer can take the table so each piece can be cut precisely. IMHO, if the glass in broken in transit, it will be a big headache for you.
I had a college friend who worked in a truck terminal one summer. He said if a box was marked Fragile, you threw it underhand.

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