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Forum topic by uMinded posted 04-16-2014 01:05 AM 955 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


04-16-2014 01:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hand planes stanley

I am learning to work wood with hand tools only. I have recently tried chinese knockoffs (the rear handle threads stripped out) and restoring antique shop finds (needed a LOT of TLC to true up but it did work).

I was looking at getting: (all amazon’s names)

- Stanley 12-139 Bailey No.60-1/2 Low Angle Block Plane
- Stanley 12-204 No 4 Smoothing Bench Plane
- Stanley 12-905 14-Inch No.5 Contractor Grade Smooth Bottom Bench Plane
- Woodstock D3752 3-In-1 Shoulder Plane
- Stanley 12-978 1-1/2-Inch x 10-Inch Bullnose Rabbet Plane
- Stanley 12-951 SpokeShave with Flat Base

This is less than two Lee Valley or Lie Nielsen planes so its very affordable. The New Stanley SW planes have had decent reviews, they are not their old quality but still very usable. I have never seen the Woodstock 3-in-1 before so I would be interested in hearing opinions.

I am brand new to using hand planes so I don’t want to buy the best to learn on…. I made that mistake with a $65 chisel I overheated…


24 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

1386 posts in 1907 days


#1 posted 04-16-2014 01:11 AM

I would lean towards the WoodRiver V3 line of planes from Woodcraft over any modern Stanley plane. They are fairly affordable and built like the old bedrocks. I have the #6 and it’s fantastic.

Also, you might want to pick up just one or two planes, try them out, learn to sharpen them properly, then make decisions about which to acquire next as your current/next project demands.

-- Allen, Colorado

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#2 posted 04-16-2014 02:22 AM

Are the new Stanley planes based off the bedrock design? I just watched a video where he said “integrated into the sole casting”. If thats true then the new Stanleys are not very tunable at all!

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Paul

566 posts in 288 days


#3 posted 04-16-2014 02:28 AM

Every new plane will need to be tuned to a certain extent. I would buy a 4 and 5 stanley and start with those. learn to flatten everything and tune it up. After you have versed yourself on those 2 and are happy with how you have tuned them up you will be able to answer your own question I believe.

Paul

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1594 posts in 613 days


#4 posted 04-16-2014 02:37 AM

Buy some Vintage planes. Learn to the them. Plenty of knowledge on the Web. Especially here.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#5 posted 04-16-2014 02:38 AM

Get a #4 and a #7.

A #5 is a carpenters tool. For a cabinetmaker it is a
compromise tool or a luxury in-between size. I use #5 planes plenty at the bench but mostly for hogging
and an old $20 Bailey will do for that. Other than
that they are useful for work on a ladder or on your
back under a house. They aren’t too heavy but they
really aren’t long enough to shoot edges in some
furniture scale work.

Carefully consider shoulder plane manufacturer reputation
for shoulder planes or return policy. There are a lot of
dogs out there that aren’t machined consistently square.

The block plane and spoke shave you can skip, imo. Get
some Iwasaki files instead.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#6 posted 04-16-2014 03:16 AM

@lateralus819 I have been looking all over for vintage planes but they are VERY rare in my city and surrounding area. I tried online deals but try shipping a #7, its ridiculous.

@Loren I considered getting a #4 and #6. I want to learn to flatten a board by hand but will still use a jointer and planer for the majority of projects. I do not have enough hobby time to do it all by hand EVERY time…

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Paul

566 posts in 288 days


#7 posted 04-16-2014 03:24 AM

To each his own, I guess. The #5 I think is a great way to get into hand planing honing the base, understanding a plane, and finding your stroke.

I used a block plane just today on some shop cabinets I’m making. I find a block plane an indispensable tool in cabinet making.

The saying “Ask a woodworker how to do 1 task and you will get 3 answers from the same woodworker comes to mind here”

This photo was taken 6 hours ago, the block plane on top of the cabinets after finishing some edges.

Paul

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Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#8 posted 04-16-2014 03:30 AM

I say then put your dollars now into a fine #4, sharpening
equipment, some card scrapers and a no. 80 cabinet scraper.

If you want to spend new, buy premium because they
work the best and have the best resale value. Many of
us don’t have deep pockets and I know from experience
that a lot of the shiny hand tools don’t get used much
in most work. Pros working at a high level need a
lot of tools available at their fingertips. For the amateur
looking to grow, I say invest in a few planes and scrapers
and maybe one or two fine chisels (filling out temporarily
with cheaper ones with crude handles)... and sharpening
gear!

Files and rasps don’t get much love but for those of us
who are working at the bench and looking for efficiency
they are real time savers. The basic hardware store
rasps you may have used suck. Files are not so
class-conscious but good rasps and floats (Iwasaki
files are floats) are pricey to very pricey and worth it.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View crank49's profile

crank49

3481 posts in 1694 days


#9 posted 04-16-2014 03:38 AM

I have always had a block plane. Can’t imagine how a woodworker could work wood without one.
A #4 is most folks “go to” bench plane for finishing work.
And I have to say my next favorite plane is my Low angle Bevel up Jack, or perhaps my #6 fore plane.
I don’t have a #7 or #8 but really want one. Will probably go for a Wood River #7 next.
My favorite specialty plane is my #92 shoulde plane.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View sikrap's profile

sikrap

1056 posts in 2082 days


#10 posted 04-16-2014 03:48 AM

Post a WTB (Want To Buy) in the “Trade & Swap” forum listing what planes you’re looking for and I suspect you’ll get plenty of offers. There are a few guys here that deal regularly and will sell you well tunes and sharpened planes ready to work at reasonable prices. IMHO, they will be better quality than the new Stanleys.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#11 posted 04-16-2014 03:56 AM

If I am going to spend a whole lot I can only afford two planes. Has anyone used a Lie Neilsen Rabbet Block Plane? It its works as a rabbet and block I think its a great deal. I will be trimming a lot of tenons and currently I use a chisel edge and a sanding block.

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#12 posted 04-16-2014 04:01 AM

@sikrap I did talk to a few with good prices but once shipping was added on I was at the price of a new WoodRiver. I think a WoodRiver would be the same quality than an 80yo stanley given they use the bedrock design.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3481 posts in 1694 days


#13 posted 04-16-2014 04:13 AM

I’d love to have a LN rabbet block, but now you’re talking money. But one of those, a #4 smoother and a Veritas Bevel up Jack would really cover a lot of bases, short of actual jointing.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1125 posts in 1967 days


#14 posted 04-16-2014 04:28 AM

STAY AWAY from the Stanley contractors planes you have listed (12-204, 12-905). The pace I work at sells them and they are almost duplicates of the Groz line of planes. Actually, imo, the Groz are better because they have wood handles. But both have crappy castings, rough machining, rough adjustability, THIN blades of unknown quality and so on….
The “contractors” label should give you a clue that these are used for rough work, paint scraping and sharpening with a grinder….

I say you should shorten your plane list to 3 planes to start. the block plane you have listed, 12-139 is a keeper as it is a good plane. So you just need a medium bench plane like a 4 or 5 and a 7. Since a 4,5 will be used Much more than the longer ones, in general, you should spend decent money on that. I think the suggestion of the Wood River V3 #4 & 5 planes is a good one.You should look into those. I’m not a fan of the fixed frog of the Stanley sweetheart #4 but the#62 (#5 sized equivalent) is quite a good plane and many like the 62 better than the #5 but that is a personal choice.
As for a #7, a decent used one off Craig’s list/ebay type sites ( or here on lj for that matter) would be your best bet. Not as expensive as a WR V3 #7 but still, based on the expected use, you don’t need to spend big bucks on this one.

Also, learn to sharpen and invest in a sharpening system of your choice.

As for the rest of the tools on the list, accumulate them as the need from projects arise. No need to spend money on tools that you won’t use (unless you want to) if you don’t end up doing projects that need them.

Last thing, go find the Handplanes of your dreams thread. There are quite a few plane hoarders/collectors over there that are recently thinning their collections and may be able to help you out with a couple planes.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies and the wall gets in the way.. - Mike -

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uMinded

65 posts in 575 days


#15 posted 04-16-2014 11:42 AM

Hmm…

I think I will get the LN rabbet block as it is the exact same price as a Stanley 12-139 Bailey No.60-1/2 Low Angle Block Plane and Woodstock D3752 3-In-1 Shoulder Plane combined and I can bet it will be superior to both in every way.

I will keep looking for a restored #4 in the meantime and maybe if I really need one I will go for the WoodRiver V3.

@WhoMe I can ship a #4 but a #7 is nearly $100 to ship, its ridiculous.

Any comments on the rabbet plane? I would have though it was a good idea for those minor tweaks on casework. Also the spoke shave would be useful for shaped legs on chairs and furniture. Alternatively I could use that money on a good cabinet scraper and a mill file and burnisher.

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