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Forum topic by sarahss posted 106 days ago 448 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sarahss

254 posts in 1253 days


106 days ago

We are installing base trim and shoe moulding and I was hoping for some advice on a nailer. For the base, we are using a 16 guage angled trim nailer. Our base is 5/8” hickory. Our shoe is essentially a 3/4” tall cove. It is also hickory. The 16 guage is working fine for the base, but I think it’s overkill for the shoe, and will likely cause it to split. What guage would be appropriate to use?


14 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1397 posts in 324 days


#1 posted 106 days ago

You might be able to get away with an 18ga nailer for the shoe. If you’re worried about splitting, you can take a strip of nails to the bench grinder and knock off a bit of the wedge forming the tip of the nail. This will allow the nail to smash through the fibers instead of wedging them apart which could result in splitting. The 16ga nails will offer more holding power and the gun will have less of a chance of not sinking the nail to the proper depth due to the additional power. There’s really not much of a difference between filling the hole left by a 16 or 18ga nail in terms of time or final appearance. A little experimentation might be worth your while depending on how many linear feet you’re installing.

View Roz's profile

Roz

1658 posts in 2390 days


#2 posted 106 days ago

I have a Dewalt finish nailer that will take 16a and 18 gauge finish nails. If correctly adjusted it will leave no mark and the nail heads are small. You can use up to a 2 inch finish nail. I have used it in hickory without trouble. I think an 18 gauge finish nailer will work well for you here.

-- Terry Roswell, L.A. (Lower Alabama) "Life is what happens to you when you are making other plans."

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1157 posts in 900 days


#3 posted 106 days ago

18 gauge is perfect. You could also go 21 gauge headless pin gun if you don’t feel like filling any holes.

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1471 posts in 876 days


#4 posted 106 days ago

Have you looked at the Porter Cable PC138? It’s a great little 23 ga. Pin Nailer and would work very well with a 1 1/4” or 1 3/8” pin for small moldings. A well placed 23 ga. pin will almost disappear into the grain.

I also use one for glue ups when there is a tight spot or clamps are in short supply.
Every rabbet joint in this 12 ft. x 45” (MDF’ing) Manicure Bar for a Nail Pro salon was glued and pinned with my 23 ga. pinner.

Best Regards. – Grandpa Len
Work Safely and have Fun.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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GrandpaLen

1471 posts in 876 days


#5 posted 106 days ago

oops, sorry the pics didn’t transfer, I’ll try that again.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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Grandpa

3055 posts in 1279 days


#6 posted 106 days ago

I haven’t used a 23 ga pinner so I am going to ask this question. Will it hold over the long haul without glue? I would reach for an 18 ga that would shoot 1-1/4 nails. The 23 might be the perfect tool but is it perfect for this job if you don’t use glue?

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GrandpaLen

1471 posts in 876 days


#7 posted 106 days ago

...well my publishing skills need a little tweaking but the pinner results are the same.
My son Rick helped install this 400+ lb. counter.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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GrandpaLen

1471 posts in 876 days


#8 posted 106 days ago

It should hold just fine. I had to test it in the MDF to be sure that the pins wouldn’t mushroom the MDF so I shot 6, 1” pins into the corner edge, butt jointed, no glue, along a 24” joint and and was surprised at the holding strength.
Pick one up at HD, If your not satisfied, return it.

Best Regards. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View sarahss's profile

sarahss

254 posts in 1253 days


#9 posted 106 days ago

nice manicure bar Len. Thanks for the input—gonna run all this by my hubby and see what he wants to do.

View Vincent Nocito's profile

Vincent Nocito

411 posts in 1968 days


#10 posted 106 days ago

My oak trim is built up from four pieces. The base and cap are 5/8” and are attached with 2” 16 and 18 gauge finish nails. The mid rail is attached with hidden 18 gauge brads angled into the base/studs. The shoe molding is 5/16” and is attached with 1” 23 gauge pins.

View BilltheDiver's profile

BilltheDiver

227 posts in 1489 days


#11 posted 106 days ago

I also enjoy using a 23 gauge pinner. I have a Grex. Since the pins are headless, the trick is to alternate angling them into the wood rather than shooting straight in. The pins are also inexpensive so you can use a lot of them.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3279 posts in 1417 days


#12 posted 106 days ago

18 gauge will work for both pieces of trim. I have a Bostitch 1855K 2” brad nailer that I have really been pleased with. It’s a good reliable gun. 15 and 16 gauge guns were the industry standard for years, but now that 18 gauge nailers are widely available with 2” fasteners, they are gaining in popularity.
On the few rare occasions I have had to knock something apart, I realized how much holding power these little nails have.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Richard's profile

Richard

799 posts in 1294 days


#13 posted 106 days ago

I agree with Len that a 23 gauge pin nailer is great for use on very small trim to prevent splitting it. And as bill said if you alternate angling them into the wood rather than shooting straight in they will hold just as good as larger brads but putting a thin layer of glue on small trim couldn’t hurt either.
I got a 23 gauge pin nailer from HF since I didn’t think I would use it much and the price was under $20. But I have found myself useing it more often than I expected and it has held up really well.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1243 posts in 552 days


#14 posted 106 days ago

I have some advice on the splitting issue. When nailing with a T head nail, if you rotate the gun to fire the nail with T running with the grain you are less likely to have a split. I believe the reason for most splitting is the driver hitting the wood. if it is perpendicular with the grain then it is likely to split. If you rotate the gun 90* it is less likely to split the material. I showed this to a guy on the last job sight I was on and he was dumbfounded. Try it for yourself it has worked for me.

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