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Parts of a bowl

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Forum topic by PASs posted 04-14-2014 03:57 AM 1082 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PASs

587 posts in 2561 days


04-14-2014 03:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: terminology bowl lathe turning resource question

I thought this would be an easy question to answer, what are the parts of a bowl?
I spent several minutes searching the internet and didn’t come up with an answer.
Specifically I want to know what the middle part of the bowl is called.
If the top is the rim, and the bottom is the bottom or foot, then what’s the part in between.
Not a joke, seriously want to know.
Thanks all.

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."


15 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1597 days


#1 posted 04-14-2014 11:18 AM

I call that area between top and bottom of the bowl the profile or simply curve. You can define that profile or curve in many ways. Richard Raffan devotes a chapter on form in his book, “Turned Bowl Design.”

I stick with body or curve so people understand what am talking about.

-- Bill

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1192 days


#2 posted 04-14-2014 01:21 PM

I understand the foot and rim having their own names, but the area between each is a “bowl”. It doesn’t matter whether it’s closed or open in shape or has a pedestal or recessed foot. It’s a bowl. In nature, a bowl is a depression in the landscape. I believe Death Valley is a bowl. Then, in man made structures, there are ampitheaters with names ending with bowl. Bowls are everywhere. So, to answer your question, the center section of the bowl, is a bowl…..... Heheheeh …... Jerry (in Tucson) hyped up on coffee this morning.

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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PASs

587 posts in 2561 days


#3 posted 04-14-2014 02:09 PM

Thanks for the feedback.
I probably should have mentioned the reason I wanted to know in the original post.
As I am describing things on my website and I am looking for something that the non-woodworker would be able to relate to.
As an example, how would you describe this 6” bowl?

Thanks,
Woodworks by Pete

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2321 days


#4 posted 04-14-2014 02:52 PM

I’d simply use the descriptive word: beautiful

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2225 days


#5 posted 04-14-2014 04:06 PM

Beautiful is lost in translation. According to the rules of numerous woodturning clubs, bowls are described as: open form – such as yours, with largest open diameter at the rim; closed form, where the opening is curved half, or more, toward the opening. Hope this kinda sorta maybe helps.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View dirtycurty's profile

dirtycurty

44 posts in 1040 days


#6 posted 04-14-2014 10:03 PM

I too am learning things like you are trying to. I have learned the terms you already have said but also the inside curved part from the bottom of the bowl to the wall of the bowl is called the transition area and the thing black ring would be known as the feature ring. The feature ring is generally the decorative area and the widest part of the bowl if there is a decorative area. These are the wood turning terms, I’m not sure how to relay this to the average joe.

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dirtycurty

44 posts in 1040 days


#7 posted 04-14-2014 10:06 PM

If you do any research on making segmented bowls you will find a lot of talk about feature rings. Segmented bowls are pretty much all I make and am still learning it myself

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1597 days


#8 posted 04-14-2014 10:46 PM

When you become a demonstrator or writer of articles & books probably will have to sit down and think up words that will elevate your bowls to fine art.

Bottom line, as long as your proportions are spot on what does it matter?

I listen to folks talk & read what people have written about golden mean, ratio, & rectangle for years. When everyone put their bowls they have turned on a table who can tell the differences. Many of those folks do not know what they are talking about, or fail to execute a bowl using golden anything.

Now I do believe in and have used the rule of thirds for turning bowls and spindles from time to time. Basically doing little math in my head after taking a few measurements to get pleasing proportions. Works for me!

-- Bill

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2225 days


#9 posted 04-15-2014 04:27 PM

+100 for Wildwood ! Of course, the “professionals” in the woodturning organization I am with will absolutely not agree – “It’s my subjective judgement that . . . . . . . . . . . .” I have actually seen them get out a ruler, or dividers, to justify themselves. As long as it pleases you, and the person it is intended for, it will be correct.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#10 posted 04-15-2014 06:24 PM

I call it the belly of the bowl.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View PASs's profile

PASs

587 posts in 2561 days


#11 posted 04-16-2014 01:09 AM

Thanks for the comments so far.
I can understand feature ring in segmented or layered bowls where there might be specific and visually separate structural areas.
I’m also really surprised there doesn’t seem to be a commonly accepted term.
If I find a definitive source I’ll post it.

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1536 days


#12 posted 04-16-2014 03:26 AM

Body?

View whiskygonewrong's profile

whiskygonewrong

62 posts in 1142 days


#13 posted 04-18-2014 11:30 AM

Hi that’s a really good question. I have been turning bowls for to years now and you have got me thinking what it is called, and the answer is I don’t know. If anyone asks me I say the internal part of the bowl in say 50mm or2 inches deep. Cheers dunk

-- I always have wood in my shed

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Roger

19867 posts in 2266 days


#14 posted 05-04-2014 01:05 PM

I’d say the center is the ice-cream crevice. :)

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Matty272's profile

Matty272

52 posts in 1001 days


#15 posted 05-04-2014 04:06 PM

Totally unscientific and untrained opinion from me, but the widest part on the outside, I’d call the belly.

I reckon that most folks would recognise this immediately, simply because many of us bow outwards at the belly and it’s the widest part (and in the middle, too)

-- It's worth every moment of effort you put in if the kids enjoy it!

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