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Forum topic by Bdubya posted 04-13-2014 04:35 PM 930 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bdubya

6 posts in 1417 days


04-13-2014 04:35 PM

I would like to build some patio furniture, a table and chairs as well as some chaise lounges and I am wondering on wood choices and suggestions. I am not interested in using treated lumber and cedar is an ok option but looking for other suggestions.

I live in Minnesota if that helps with choices.

Thanks


13 replies so far

View RoadHogg's profile

RoadHogg

124 posts in 1387 days


#1 posted 04-13-2014 05:48 PM

I’m looking at doing the same thing. I’m not a wood expert but this is what I’ve read. Choices are Cedar, Cypress, White Oak, Teak, Shorea, Acacia and possibly others.

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, ReadWatchDo.com

View levan's profile

levan

472 posts in 2439 days


#2 posted 04-13-2014 05:57 PM

White oak

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

589 posts in 1534 days


#3 posted 04-13-2014 06:04 PM

How about Larch ?
I have a couple of out door projects to do also, and was trying to decide what to use.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#4 posted 04-14-2014 01:02 AM

I would say white oak or ipe. Cypress and teak are good, but costly, options as well.

-- Art

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a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#5 posted 04-14-2014 01:23 AM

Don’t forget Ipe

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View endgrainy's profile

endgrainy

237 posts in 1348 days


#6 posted 04-14-2014 03:54 AM

I recently completed some Adirondack chairs that I made from white oak (linked below.) It’s inexpensive, easy to work, and durable. White oak supposedly does well outdoors – I left the chairs unfinished, so we’ll see what happens. Teak would be an amazing option, but I find it prohibitively expensive.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/99146

-- Follow me on Instagram @endgrainy

View RoadHogg's profile

RoadHogg

124 posts in 1387 days


#7 posted 04-14-2014 04:40 AM

Beautiful chairs! I think white oak will turn grey in the weather but I have no experience with it either. I wish white oak was inexpensive in my area. It’s very expensive here.

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, ReadWatchDo.com

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1395 days


#8 posted 04-14-2014 04:49 AM

Heard lots of good things about white oak

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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Minorhero

372 posts in 2065 days


#9 posted 04-14-2014 10:43 AM

I was at a craft fair the other weekend and a fellow was showing off patio furniture made of quartersawn white oak. He had a piece that he said was outside for 15 years and was in very nice shape.

Of course he also admitted it was outside in Arizona.

If you live somewhere very very dry like Arizona I would say it almost does not matter. Since you said you live in Minnesota, I would say white oak is only a viable option if you finish it with polyurethane. If you don’t plan to finish it then don’t expect to get more then a handful of seasons out of it. Also keep in mind that keeping the chairs off of dirt, and out of the rain will be VERY important for their lifespan. If you leave them on say the lawn, I would not expect more then 3 years out of them before the bottoms rot.

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

554 posts in 1772 days


#10 posted 04-14-2014 11:53 AM

I used cypress on a pair of Adirondack chairs, about 15 years ago. Still going strong, they only get partial weather exposure, sitting on a covered porch. No treatment of any kind, I just blow out the rotting leaves every now and again, when they accumulate where the seat meets the back. No rot, no bugs.

I use white (not red) oak on my canoe trailer racks, full exposure all year, plus a little road salt (ya, I paddle in winter, don’t you?). No rot, some slight warp. One set is going on 4 years, still with most of its strength.

White oak Adirondack chairs would be a little on the heavy side, if that matters to you. The cypress is more like the density of pine.

No one mentioned- use waterproof glue, or even Gorilla (urethane) glue and stainless steel fasteners.

-- Dan V. in Indy

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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


#11 posted 04-14-2014 11:55 AM

what about black locust? I understand it is very hard and along the lines of white oak.

View mloy365's profile

mloy365

444 posts in 2590 days


#12 posted 04-14-2014 02:02 PM

QS white oak. Easy to come by in the land of 10,000 lakes.

-- Mike - Northern Upper Michigan

View RoadHogg's profile

RoadHogg

124 posts in 1387 days


#13 posted 04-14-2014 02:03 PM

mloy. Maybe I need to bring my truck and trailer down and get some of that plentiful QS White Oak. What’s the cost /BF there?

-- "The difference between school and real life is that in real life the tests come first, and then the lessons" -- Robert Lang, ReadWatchDo.com

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