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Forum topic by Jerry posted 04-09-2014 02:23 AM 1432 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

588 posts in 338 days


04-09-2014 02:23 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple plane milling

Every time I bring a piece of maple home and cut it into pieces to make a box, the next day all of the pieces are cupped. I’ve managed on several occasions to use heat to remove the cup and flatten them back, but in the case of the top and bottom pieces for the box I’m currently making, I had to edge join two pieces of maple to achieve the width I needed for the top and bottom of the box.

Even though I straightened the wood yesterday before I glued and clamped up the pieces for the top and bottom, by today, they were warped again, this time across the width of the boards

I’ve been trying to flatten these boards by using my scrub plane first, then graduating to the jack plane and finally to the smoother, but I cannot seem to get a consistent thickness , and if I keep on planing, pretty soon I will wind up with a piece of veneer.

Advice anyone? I sure could use some…

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.


19 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5092 posts in 1267 days


#1 posted 04-09-2014 02:29 AM

Moisture content?

It’s all I got…....

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

616 posts in 620 days


#2 posted 04-09-2014 02:31 AM

Allow the wood to sit in your shop, or in the house or it’s destination environment for a few weeks before working it. This will both allow it to stabilize to the amibient humidity and allow you to see what it’s going to do before you dimension it, so you can deal with any movement first. (Or just stop bringing them home and work on them wherever you happen to be finding these ornery boards :))

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

384 posts in 211 days


#3 posted 04-09-2014 02:48 AM

After cutting them, stack them flat with a heavy weight on top until you are ready to assemble.

View Tedster's profile

Tedster

2271 posts in 901 days


#4 posted 04-09-2014 03:11 AM

If you’re leaving them laying flat the face down side will not dry the same as the exposed side, or suck moisture from the air if such is the case. Also, of the boards are not quarter-sawn the outside rings will tend to contract more than the inside rings.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

888 posts in 324 days


#5 posted 04-09-2014 03:21 AM

so like picklehead and ted said.

I bring it home, I sticker it… even though it’s dry, I want air to equally get to it.. I let it reach equillibrium for a week or 2. Then I work it.
I never work it immediately.
And if you plane them, make sure you do both sides somewhat equally, to release the stresses together, since moisture is picked up by the surface faster than the interior.

-- Jeff NJ

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

312 posts in 586 days


#6 posted 04-09-2014 03:32 AM

I agree the problem is moisture content related. I have dealt with the same problems in the past and yes laying the board down flat on a solid surface will often result in cupping if it’s not reached equilibrium with the air in the shop. One way I’ve used to straighten out this problem is to set the board over a heat vent with the cupped (concave) side facing up. As the moisture level equals out on both sides the board will return to flat. It doesn’t take long to correct this issue.
P.S. I took a quick trip to you tube and found this video that addresses your problem, check it out.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWDQGhLv-_k

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

588 posts in 338 days


#7 posted 04-09-2014 03:48 AM

Okay, I think my post was a little misunderstood. I understand about moisture content and why uneven drying causes cupping, and I watched the video about getting the cupping out, that is the method I’ve been using to fix the cupping. My question is about planing, not dealing with moisture content. I need some guidance on how to make the boards flat by planing them correctly because it’s obvious I’m not doing it right. The maple I’m getting is never going to be quartersawn, so I have to deal with the grain the way it is. The heat method is not fixing the cupping completely, so I need to fix it with the plane, but I’m not getting the right result, so if anyone has any advice about the correct way to fix this with hand planes, that is what I’m after.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

View Tedster's profile

Tedster

2271 posts in 901 days


#8 posted 04-09-2014 04:20 AM

Watching a true master might help. He starts planing the cupped board at about 5:20

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5pJxeT3rEo

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

588 posts in 338 days


#9 posted 04-09-2014 05:09 AM

RE Ted: There it goes. I have watched a few of this youtuber’s videos. This guy is amazing. Thank you.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

View Tedster's profile

Tedster

2271 posts in 901 days


#10 posted 04-09-2014 05:28 AM

I found his videos right here at lumberjocks. Truly amazing indeed.

-- I support the 28th Amendment. http://www.wolf-pac.com/28th

View TerryDowning's profile

TerryDowning

1009 posts in 808 days


#11 posted 04-09-2014 03:50 PM

Jerry, check these out from Paul Sellers as well.

Video 1
Video 2

Don’t expect perfection from your first couple dozen boards. It is a practiced skill that takes time and patience to develop.

For planing It’s essentially 4 steps
Start by planing a good reference edge. (Jointing) you don’t have to use a jointer or try plane. The size of the plane to use is dictated by the planes you have and the starting size of the board. Paul Sellers often works with a smooth plane (Stanley 4 or 4 1/2)

Next plane a a flat surface.

Followed by the opposite edge to the desired width

Last plane the opposing face. Set gauge lines from your reference surface and plane flat to the the desired dimension.

The final dimension may actually depend on the board you are starting with. I have a 3/4” pine board that is so badly cupped, bowed, and twisted that it will not create a flat usable board for a finished project of any real size. I keep it around for cutting off small pieces and testing the tuning of planes and saws.

-- - Terry

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

588 posts in 338 days


#12 posted 04-09-2014 06:35 PM

Thanks Terry, I did watch the videos from Paul as well as the Japanese master. I see my error now. I went crazy with the scrub plane when I should have just flattened the raised edges first and the hump on the opposite side second.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

View TerryDowning's profile

TerryDowning

1009 posts in 808 days


#13 posted 04-09-2014 06:43 PM

It is easy to get carried away

-- - Terry

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11242 posts in 1380 days


#14 posted 04-10-2014 01:30 AM

Jerry, That’s what they make power jointers for! Sorry, I couldn’t resist!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

588 posts in 338 days


#15 posted 04-10-2014 02:07 AM

Believe me I am sorely tempted. I DO have a jointer, but it’s only 4” wide ( Shopsmith ) I’d need a 12” jointer to do this…

On the up side, I’ve made a little progress. I was unable to straighten out the edge glued boards with the plane because they were so severely cupped, so I sawed them back into two pieces, and then they spent awhile in front of my propane shop heater. Eventually, I was able to get almost all of the cup out. I reglued them and have been flattening them with the No. 4 1/2 for the better part of an hour, but I’m a lot closer now than I was yesterday.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

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