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Forum topic by RyRat posted 04-05-2014 04:24 PM 695 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RyRat

22 posts in 153 days


04-05-2014 04:24 PM

I have a Dewalt drill bit set, this one to be exact.

Are they worth sharpening, or should I just buy better bits as needed?

-- If you are flammable and have legs, you are never blocking a fire exit. -Mitch Hedberg


18 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3749 posts in 2301 days


#1 posted 04-05-2014 04:31 PM

RyRat—I have a cheaper set than that and sharpen them every so often as needed (I have a Drill Doctor). I bought these bits about 30 years ago on sale at an Ace Hardware store.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1208 posts in 1074 days


#2 posted 04-05-2014 04:54 PM

The Pilot Point bits were a “gimmick” type bit that Black & Decker came up with to market to the home owner. They were meant to replace having separate sets for metal and wood with the “pilot point” to allow better accuracy of the bit placement. A good concept, but it fails when the bit dulls, as no conventional method of sharpening the bits will work. You cant use bit sharpeners because they grind the “pilot” off and they are next to impossible to sharpen on a standard grinding wheel.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

255 posts in 922 days


#3 posted 04-05-2014 07:16 PM

“My friend asked me if I wanted a frozen banana. I said, ‘no, but I want a regular banana later, so yeah.’” I have no advice on the bits, but I love Mitch Hedberg!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2313 days


#4 posted 04-05-2014 08:23 PM

If you can grind them by hand yourself it would be worth a try I suppose. Generally, If a bit doesn’t say HSS ~ High Speed Steel ~ it isn’t worth much, IMO.

Gerry – Does your Drill Doctor sharpen that style?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3749 posts in 2301 days


#5 posted 04-05-2014 09:03 PM

Topa—Nice catch … no. I didn’t notice the ‘pilot point’ description in the link.

My DD sharpens only 118 degrees. The bit set I mentioned is HSS.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2313 days


#6 posted 04-05-2014 09:09 PM

I was a bit skeptical, but I picked up a set of Titanium drills at Costco one time because Costco normally only handles quality products. They were not HSS Titanium coated. They were garbage and they went back. I never buy Titanium unless it says HSS also.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View RyRat's profile

RyRat

22 posts in 153 days


#7 posted 04-05-2014 09:10 PM

Thanks everyone. I think I’ll just upgrade as needed. These bits cut like butter when new, but seem to wear out quick. I was also drilling a lot of metal with a few of the smaller ones, pretty sure that had something to do with it..

SupperCubber – Nice.

-- If you are flammable and have legs, you are never blocking a fire exit. -Mitch Hedberg

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

1080 posts in 1084 days


#8 posted 04-05-2014 09:17 PM

topa,I know exactly the Costco bits you are talking about,real waste of money,I’m not even sure Titanium coated bits necessarily last longer than regular bits.

-- Ken from Ontario

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3749 posts in 2301 days


#9 posted 04-05-2014 09:48 PM

Actually, I don’t get the point of coating drill bits with titanium … must be some kind of marketing ploy?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1208 posts in 1074 days


#10 posted 04-05-2014 09:58 PM

Gerry, the titanium just gives the bits less resistance when drilling. Less resistance means less heat so the bits should last longer. It really only works if the bits and coating are of good quality to begin with.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1433 posts in 999 days


#11 posted 04-05-2014 10:27 PM

Drill bits are consumables. Buy new ones.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2313 days


#12 posted 04-05-2014 10:38 PM

I remember getting some kind of bit for drilling stainless steel years ago, but I do not remember what it was. Our purchasing agent got them and sent them to the job. They didn’t work very well, but lasted longer than the regular bits. Probably T coated?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

1080 posts in 1084 days


#13 posted 04-06-2014 12:07 AM

Maybe Cobalt bits?they are great for drilling stainless steel but break with the slightes side pressure.

-- Ken from Ontario

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

911 posts in 663 days


#14 posted 04-06-2014 01:16 AM

I buy nothing but cobalt bits, since I drill metal often, including stainless, hardened steel, etc. But as distrbd says, they are somewhat brittle. I have even broken bits that weren’t much less than 1/2” diameter. I have a few TiN coated bits, but have never been impressed with them.

By the way, there is a way to drill stainless even with ordinary HSS bits. This tip was passed on to me 30 years ago or so, when cobalt bits weren’t easy to find. I was told to use canned milk as a lubricant. Well, it really does work. I surmise that it’s the water that cools, while the butterfat lubricates. But if you keep an opened can of it around, it soon stinks. So I thought to try “miscible” (water soluble) oil, aka dormant spray for your apple trees. Mixed with water, it both cools and lubes, and really does work. What kills HSS in stainless is that the bits get super hot, and then they’re toast (so to speak). You have to add the mix often, as the water soon boils away. I keep a little spray bottle handy for this.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2313 days


#15 posted 04-06-2014 01:39 AM

runswithscissors, Now you tell me! I retired last week ;-) Doubt if I ever have to drill SS again. Usually, I told the metal installer it was their responsibility to do all the drilling and cutting.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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