LumberJocks

Folding Craft Table

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Sunstealer73 posted 04-04-2014 09:06 PM 782 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

42 posts in 847 days


04-04-2014 09:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

My wife has asked me to build a folding craft table that will match our existing furniture in both the office and living room. I looked at the commercial folding leg hardware and was not too impressed. The reviews seem to indicate that the locks are easily broken. I also looked at a few plans that seemed to work OK, but looked flimsy to me. I decided to try and come up with my own design.

What I came up with is to run a dowel between the aprons on each side. The legs would each have a hole bored all the way through and just slightly larger than the dowel so that they pivot on it easily. The legs would have a threaded insert below the dowel. A custom-made knob with a bolt glued in would go through the apron and thread into the insert to lock the leg in the open position. When you need to collapse it down, you unscrew the four bolts, pivot the legs up (sliding one on the dowel so all four can fold flat) and use a lock on the bottom of the table to keep them closed.

I mocked it up really quickly with some scrap and it works well and seems really strong. In all the photos, imagine the scrap plywood as the apron, the oak 2×4 as the leg, and the drywall screw as the threaded knob. The dowel would not be drilled through to the outside on the actual project of course.

Locked open position:

From the inside, dowel would run apron to apron:

Unlocked and folded:

The top will be plywood faced with laminate for ease of cleanup.


8 replies so far

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

502 posts in 275 days


#1 posted 04-05-2014 02:39 AM

So, the weight is borne entirely by the dowels and support is not transferred to the table top except indirectly through the aprons ? Will there be much weight on this table ?

-- Practicing unfamiliar techniques on scrap before committing to the real piece leads to safe and reliable results.

View Paul's profile

Paul

586 posts in 319 days


#2 posted 04-05-2014 03:20 AM

I’m trying to in vision your description with your mock up and having zero luck. Your description has 4 dowels your picture has 1.

Your description says threaded inserts , then I get lost in your head.

I’ve read it thoroughly 4 times now and can’t make heads or tails of the description from the picture, sorry.

Paul

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

502 posts in 275 days


#3 posted 04-05-2014 04:09 AM

PLK, what Sunstealer is depicting there is a mock-up of one leg. The 2X4 represents one leg and the plywood represents one apron. There will be two dowels, each one supporting two legs. The inserts, the screws and the knobs are simply for locking the legs in place.

-- Practicing unfamiliar techniques on scrap before committing to the real piece leads to safe and reliable results.

View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

42 posts in 847 days


#4 posted 04-05-2014 02:27 PM

Yonak has it exactly right.

Not much weight. Just drawing and general crafting. The commercial brackets also do not seem to have any way to transfer weight from the top to the legs. I may need to think about if there is a way to provide a little more support than just the dowel and knob though.

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

502 posts in 275 days


#5 posted 04-05-2014 03:04 PM

Sunstealer, here’s a temporary table I made a short while ago, which is meant to extend our dining room table when needed. It doesn’t fold up but the legs detachable, assembled in pairs.

The leg assemblies fit into apron frame slots and are locked in with pegs.

The table top then fits down over the aprons. Actually, when the top is not used for this purpose it’s a cover for the pastry board on a kitchen counter and used occasionally as a sort-of kitchen table.

-- Practicing unfamiliar techniques on scrap before committing to the real piece leads to safe and reliable results.

View KS_Sparky's profile

KS_Sparky

26 posts in 377 days


#6 posted 04-05-2014 06:58 PM

The weight would be transferred down to the legs through the dowels and the threaded rods affixed to the knobs. You might consider adding some support blocks glued to the bottom of the table top to take some weight off the apron and support the dowels (and shorten them as well). So that the legs still fold flat, you could glue the bearing blocks for one pair of legs, and have sliding bearing blocks on the other side.

-- apprentice Electrician, IBEW L.U. 226

View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

42 posts in 847 days


#7 posted 05-05-2014 10:23 PM

Well, I did it. It worked pretty well I think. I wouldn’t want to sit on it, but it is plenty strong enough for doing crafts, setting extra food on at parties, etc. I got to buy a new drill press to ensure the holes were drilled perfectly square. I used box joints on the apron to try and give it as much strength as I can (I’ve never done dovetails).



I’m going to be making new knobs out of the same wood instead of the crappy plastic ones I have on there now.

Here’s the new drill press I bought. I usually stay away from Sears power tools, but this one is really nice. As far as I can tell, it is actually made by Steel City. The quill stroke is about 4 1/2”, which is really nice.

View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

42 posts in 847 days


#8 posted 05-18-2014 02:57 PM

I have posted the project showing how it turned out:

Click for details

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase