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Forum topic by HokieMojo posted 2020 days ago 11046 views 7 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2326 days


2020 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection pvc duct

I could use a little help. After a lot of help from fellow LJ’s, I bought a brand new delta 1.5 hp DC. It has a 6 inch intake port but comes with a splitter that reduces the intake to 4” right off the bat. I went to home depot to look at PVC and it seems that when I look at 4” pipe, there are actually two sizes, but both are labeled 4”. They are segregated so I guess I can stay consistent to make sure that I have pieces that work together, but I want to be sure that what I buy will work with true woodworking accessories.

Can anyone explain the difference between the two pipes? Also, I noticed one is much thinner (wall thickness) than the other and is 1/2 the cost. I’d rather go with this since it sounds like it will suit my needs. I think I’m probably making this more complicated than it needs to be. Any advice would be appreciated.


31 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15655 posts in 2816 days


#1 posted 2020 days ago

One is schedule 40 and the other is schedule 80. Schedule 80 has the thicker walls and is rated for higher-pressure applications. For purposes of dust collection, I don’t see any reason to use the more expensive pipe.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2326 days


#2 posted 2020 days ago

Thanks Charlie,
That’s what I was hoping to hear. So I guess the schedule 40 stuff works well with woodworking accessories?

View gene's profile

gene

2184 posts in 2481 days


#3 posted 2020 days ago

Hi! Hokie,
In the plumbing trade, schedule 40 PVC is white and foam-core PVC is white also, same as schedule 40 in size, but used for (drainage only) not for pressure. Schedule 80 is gray. ( I know! Just like electrical, but different) I think you want SD PVC. That may be what you were looking at. It’s 1/2 the wall thickness of 40 and a lot cheaper. It is what I have on my system. If SD is not what you were looking at? You may need to check in the department that sells the drain field, underground piping and corrugated piping used for connecting to down spouts and used for solid septic tank drain connections. If you have trouble finding the right fittings that you need? They make hub adapters that allow you to use regular sch. 40 drainage fittings. You can also get the stand off type hangers and supports you need in the electrical department there.
Good luck and let us know how the new Delta works. I’m waiting on your recommendation before ordering mine.
God bless
P.S. I did ground my system. I know there are different views on this, But made me feel better!

-- Gene, a Christian in Virginia

View David Freed's profile

David Freed

97 posts in 2265 days


#4 posted 2020 days ago

I used S&D (sewer & drain) on my entire system. The 6” blast gates that came with my ClearVue cyclone fit right on it. I didn’t ground my system and it will give you a zap if you get too close to it. I have not only felt it, I have seen the arc jump a 1/4” or more (those hurt). Like Gene mentioned, I have read several discussions (arguements?) on whether to ground or not. I also agree with Gene, if it makes you feel better, do it.

P.S. When you are putting together your system, use either large radius 90 elbows, or two 45 elbows put together. The short radius 90’s create too much resistance. I and many others I know of used 2 – 45’s because the large 90’s are expensive.
Also check around before you buy your fittings. Some places charge twice as much as others. Someone just posted a day or two ago on one of the forums I frequent (can’t remember which one) that they found a place to buy 6” wye’s for $17. That is about as cheap as you will find.

-- David, Southern Indiana

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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2326 days


#5 posted 2020 days ago

I think I’ve got it. S&D is the same as foamcore. The foam core was what I was stearing towards till I chickened out for fear of getting the wrong thing. The only thing I didn’t really like about it was that it had less options (at HD at least) for the various connectors. Soubnds like there are some workarounds.

Thanks for the responses!

Gene,
Just as an FYI, it will probably be a little while till I truly get overything hooked up for DC. I’m working on a crib at the moment that needs to get done first. Ones that is done, I’ll start on the DC. I can tell you about the experience so far. the item was well packaged, seems solid, was easy to assemble, and seems pretty powerful. I know adding the piping will drastically reduce the power, but I’ll have to see what happens.

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2361 days


#6 posted 2020 days ago

If your going to run a ducting system I would start out with 6” for a few feet. Hard to say anymore without knowing what your plans for layout are..

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David Freed

97 posts in 2265 days


#7 posted 2020 days ago

I don’t know all the different types of pvc pipe there are, but the S&D pipe I used was not foam core. It was just thin walled pvc pipe. I have seen foam core pipe, but I don’t know what it is supposed to be used for. When I built my house and shop, all I ever used was schedule 40 for supply (pressure) lines, and S&D for drains and dust collection. I have never needed anything else.

-- David, Southern Indiana

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1103 posts in 2143 days


#8 posted 2020 days ago

I have used the s&d 4” for several years now, and no problems, it is best to run wire the full length of the pipe, and ground it also, other wise it could carry sparks from the static electricity and start a fire in the dust, that is what I’ve been told, so I play it safe, the wire can be run on the outside of the pipe, I run mine in a spiral around it and it works ok.
Smitty

-- Smitty!!!

View Doug S.'s profile

Doug S.

295 posts in 2305 days


#9 posted 2020 days ago

Same as David here. I used 6” (and a bit of 4”) S&D with my ClearVue and other than being thinner walled, it’s identical to Schedule 40. I did see some stuff referred to as S&D at a supplier that had a black plastic inside liining though and I’m thinking that may have been the foamcore type you’re referring to. You definitely dont want Schedule 40 though if you’re hanging it. It;s way heavier. The Schedule 40 fittings will also not work for S&D. You’ll have to make sure you’re getting the right elbows & Wyes for S&D.

-- Use the fence Luke

View gene's profile

gene

2184 posts in 2481 days


#10 posted 2020 days ago

Hey Guys!
Plumbing lessons 101

TYPES OF PIPE AND THEIR TYPICAL APPLACTIONS

(Schedule 80 is Gray in color and mainly used for commercial applications.)

#1- Schedule 40 PVC can be used for pressure or drainage applications and has a wall thickness of about a 1/4 inch. The color code printed on the side of Schedule 40, most of the time is either red or blue. The fittings are different though. The fittings for drainage are called DWV (drainage, waste, vent) and they do not make them in a size less than 1- 1/2” and anything 1-1/4” and below is strictly used for cold water pressure applications only. (This pipe can melt if used on Hot water!!)

#2- What we plumbers in my locality call foam-core can only be used for DWV application. They came out with this product a few years back to save cost in manufacturing, plus it does not conduct noise as much when used on drainage, regular schedule 40 conducts a lot more noise. Foam-core pipe is also more brittle and breaks easier. The (ID) or inside diameter and the (OD) outside diameter of foam-core and schedule 40 are exactly identical. The color code on this pipe is usually Black. Uses the same glue and primer as schedule 40.

#3- S&D piping is PVC pipe used strictly for underground utilities such as septic tanks and storm drain connections for down spouts. It has a wall thickness of about 1/8 to 3/16 inch. I do not think this pipe comes in any other sizes larger than 4 inch or 6 inch. The fitting choices for this pipe is limited. However they do make hub adapters enabling you to use schedule 40 fittings. Same glue and primer as schedule 40.

#4- CPVC piping is used for domestic water. Hot or Cold. The pipe is usually beige with a black lettering code on the side and the glue used is orange.
NOTE! (You can not use regular PVC glue on this pipe) this pipe cannot be mixed with PVC. the sizes are slightly different.

  1. 5- Schedule 40 Galvanized threaded pipe is for water and air applications. On air lines, always use at least 300# ball valve. This pipe is not used for natural gas because the galvanising can flake and cause blockages in the orifice. Note (most building codes do not permit use for water any more)

#6- Schedule 40 black threaded is mainly used for natural gas and petroleum product installations. NOTE ( Do not use for air lines) The moisture in the air will cause rust on the interior walls and then can be transmitted to the equipment being used, such as spray guns, etc., etc. You can see this when you blow down your air separator. The water will be slightly cloudy with a rust color.

I hope this helps and God bless

-- Gene, a Christian in Virginia

View Cantputjamontoast's profile

Cantputjamontoast

331 posts in 2030 days


#11 posted 2020 days ago

You are getting good advice here. I’m not an accomplished woodworker but I have going on 13 years experience as a pipe salesman.

Delta probably has it in the manual but I have to mention static electricity. Do they talk about it? I ‘d hate to hear you had a fire and know that I did not mention it because I was being Bashful. Mostly I act like Dopey or Grumpy. Might even change my picture.

-- "Not skilled enough to wipe jam on toast!"

View Doug S.'s profile

Doug S.

295 posts in 2305 days


#12 posted 2019 days ago

Gene
I might be spacing out on the number, but is there a Schedule 35? Or some other PVC pipe with a 35 in the spec? When I got my S&D 2 of the guys there were talking about how they only had to stock one type of fittings as the ones for XX35 also fit S&D. They had a pretty large selection of Wyes, Elbows, Reducers, Couplings, etc that are the same white PVC as Schedule 40 and the S&D.

-- Use the fence Luke

View Cantputjamontoast's profile

Cantputjamontoast

331 posts in 2030 days


#13 posted 2019 days ago

There is something called SDR 35. The # 35 comes from the ratio of the wall thickness to the diam of the pipe.
SDR I think means Standard dimension Ratio.

Generally the OD(outside dim ) matches so that the fittings are more universal. SDR 35 is gasketed and generally used for municipal sewer applications. It is watertight (with an allowable leakage, as all gasketed connections have, remeber even a battleship has a bilge pump) to 10.8 psi which is like 20 ft of standing water in a pipe.

There are tees, wyes, elbows for S&D (sewer and Drain). Don’t be afraid to call a larger pipe supplier, explain what you are doing and they will help. It won’t be a million $ order but they should help you.

I know TMI. Retreating to my crevice in the rocks.

Don’t forget to ground for static electricity.

-- "Not skilled enough to wipe jam on toast!"

View gene's profile

gene

2184 posts in 2481 days


#14 posted 2019 days ago

Doug,
I do know about SDR35. Typicality Green in color. Most of its fittings are white. Not applicable for anything around the house or shop.
As Can’t mentioned. Call a plumbing wholesale supply and ask for someone in sales. Tell them what you are doing and they will in most cases, be glad to help you. After all, they need the business. If they act like they
don’t, “Well “you do not what to deal with that company anyway. Most wholesale houses will sell to you at a reduced price. They are not supposed to, but most will. However, in most cases, not at the same price as a plumbing contractor would get. They probably have about ten different prices for the same item, depending on the volume of business a company does with them. I have found that Lowe’s ( I’m not advertising for them, just from my experiences) is about as cheap as anywhere. Your problem will be finding someone that knows what they are talking about to help you. Sometimes they may not have the selection that a plumbing supply would have either.
Hope this helps!
God bless

-- Gene, a Christian in Virginia

View Bassmaster911's profile

Bassmaster911

12 posts in 1774 days


#15 posted 1663 days ago

I know I am digging up an old thread but.. What is the best way to transition from s&d pvc to 4 inch flex hose? Thanks

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