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Watco teak oil ?'s

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Forum topic by athomas5009 posted 04-04-2014 04:28 AM 775 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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athomas5009

102 posts in 305 days


04-04-2014 04:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing

I used watco teak oil to finish a few shelves I built for the kitchen cabinets. Some what following the directions I applied about half a can to 3 shelves in about a 30 min period. 2 were MDF and the other was Baltic birch ply. I kept applying moderate coats for 30 mins going from piece to piece. Recoating once it absorbed the previous coat.

After applying 3-4 coats the pieces seemed to stay somewhat moist. So I figured this was a good time to stop. Since they weren’t super wet and there was no pooling I decided to let them dry as is instead of wiping dry. The next day they were dry to the touch so I threw on a couple more coats in the same manner. So my question is should I bother putting on anymore tomorrow? Also how long should I wait to apply paste wax and buff them with steel wool?

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.


16 replies so far

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

800 posts in 781 days


#1 posted 04-04-2014 08:10 AM

I see no one else has answered this so I’ll take a crack at it….

I did some poking around the web and wasn’t able to find exactly what’s in that product. I can virtually guarantee there isn’t a drop of oil from teak wood in it. The best I was able to come up with is that it’s probably a phenolic varnish with a lot of mineral spirits thiner. If it’s a varnish I’m mildly surprised the wood soaked up so much finish. Though MDF may do that.

The basic rule of thumb is to wait until you can’t smell the finish anymore for it to be cured. The directions from Watco says to wait 12 hours before “light use.” I’d wait at least a day, probably better to wait a couple. You can probably wax it then.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1887 posts in 1181 days


#2 posted 04-04-2014 11:38 AM

I was able to find the MSDS, it’s over 55% solvents, and has less than 3% linseed oil and resins (varnish component) labeled “proprietary”. So the guess that it contains no teak oil seems to be correct (along with the other stuff purrmaster said). Sounds like it’s little more than a wiping varnish. The linseed oil and resins together probably constitute the varnish component.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1474 posts in 1049 days


#3 posted 04-04-2014 12:01 PM

There’s nothing teak about “teak oil.” You would have been better off with a couple coats of warerborne poly.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

102 posts in 305 days


#4 posted 04-04-2014 12:24 PM

I knew there wasn’t much actual oil in the watco products but was under the impression that most woodworker felt it was a decent no hassle product for pieces that won’t see much abuse. Was I wrong in thinking this?

My goal was only to make the grain pop a bit and add a little protection. Especially to the MDF pieces because I didn’t want them getting damaged at the first sight of water.

After using the product though I was curious how expensive and labor intensive it would be to make my own next time with 1/3 linseed, 1/3 varnish and 1/3 spirits. How long does a home made batch last after making?

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2842 posts in 936 days


#5 posted 04-04-2014 12:33 PM

Teak oil is actually a pretty nice finish for certain things. It’s similar to danish oil, but formulated for outdoor use. It’s an oil/varnish blend that has UV inhibitors and a long oil base (spar). This makes it a good choice for species like purpleheart and padauk which loose their vibrant colors with UV exposure.

However like any wiping varnish, it is light on protection. The best use is on items where a finish will take a beating and need to be reapplied often. A light scuffing and a wipe-down is all it takes.

For water protection you want a film building finish that can take the abuse sufficiently.

As far as drying, again you need to remember you are applying an oil/varnish blend. These do not build a film. Anything more than 2 or 3 coats is pointless. As the finish polymerizes in the wood – not on top of the wood you are limited to coats you can apply. Once the grain is sufficiently sealed off you are done. any more will sit on top and make a gummy mess.

Often times I will use an oil/varnish blend under a film building finish. Give it 7 to 10 days to cure then apply some poly. If you use waterborne poly you may want to put down a coat of dewaxed shellac first to prevent adhesion issues.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1887 posts in 1181 days


#6 posted 04-04-2014 01:05 PM

I mix my own danish oil frequently, using the 1/3 each formula you cited. It will not keep forever, however. The varnish in the mix starts curing the second it hits oxygen, and it’s very hard to stop once started. If you you pur it in the refrigerator it may (or not) keep for over a year. the thing is to test it before use, if the mixture looks thicker and less fluid, the varnish may have cured somewhat. The varnish in the can you used to make is going through the same thing, only faster since it’s not diluted with other stuff. The frig helps with it as well, and many other tricks seem to slow it down; gases on top like co2 or propane, suck the air out of the can, fill it with marbles until there is no air space and on and on and on. For me the marbles trick seems to work as well as any.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2842 posts in 936 days


#7 posted 04-04-2014 01:25 PM

Fred, I do the same but I use babyfood jars and mix in small quantities. If you are a welder, hit it with some argon before capping it. You can also use a product called Bloxygen, but it’s expensive. A good alternative is regular canned air for cleaning off keyboards. Spray the can upside down and you will get propellants only.

My new favorite mixed finish is very similar to Waterlox. I use pure tung oil, a little BLO, gloss oil based poly, and a solvent.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

102 posts in 305 days


#8 posted 04-04-2014 01:54 PM

How is the cost comparison when making your own? For instance a 32oz / quart of Watco mix is around $11. About how much would you say a quart of home brew costs? I know you prob buy enough to make a gallon plus if desired. I’m just wondering if home brew is just better quality or cheaper too.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2842 posts in 936 days


#9 posted 04-04-2014 02:21 PM

I happen to keep a lot of finishes on hand, so I have all the “ingredients” (since I use them for other things on their own anyway).

Honestly I don’t think there is any benefit from making your own danish oil over just buying watco other than saving yourself a trip to the store when you don’t have any. The watco stuff is just as good as home brew, but as Fred said has a much longer shelf life.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5773 posts in 2116 days


#10 posted 04-04-2014 02:52 PM

Back to your original question.
Allow at least 72 hrs to dry, regardless of how it feels to the touch or the can’s instructions. A week or two would be even better. You’ve applied quite a bit more than you need and I wouldn’t be surprised if you’ll see some seeping out of the edges of the ply.
Even after it’s fully cured, the moisture resistance is almost nil. You’ll need a top coat of poly or a good varnish, as lumberjoe advises.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1887 posts in 1181 days


#11 posted 04-04-2014 04:05 PM

To compare costs, you have to get the true proportion in the ready to use stuff. That’s hard to do but they generally have much more thinner than anything you would mix yourself. The last time I looked at the Watco Danish Oil MSDS, it listed ~70% solvents making the direct cost stuff very hard to do. Someone else mentioned it, in a busy hobby shop most of the stuff needed is on hand, so mixing it isn’t a cost calculation as much as a convenience. The fact that’s it’s better quality is arguable, I guess. BLO and MS are generally the same no matter the source, but I use what I consider a superior varnish (no poly stuff in my shop), but I think Watco uses an alkyd resin varnish as well…..so the quality thing is questionable.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1474 posts in 1049 days


#12 posted 04-05-2014 12:55 AM

Gee, what’s wrong with poly, Fred. I have stuff I finished with poly over 30 years ago that gets used every day and looks as good as original. Just lucky. I guess.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View mikeevens45's profile

mikeevens45

68 posts in 264 days


#13 posted 04-05-2014 02:40 AM

I would linseed, varnish and turpentine …but turpentine darkens the wood a hair..but I like the finish or use a Danish oil from a woodworking store…not box store…rockler, woodcraft , lee valley etc

mike

-- as technology progresses, wood workers seem to regress...all my power tools and my favorite is a chisel and a hand plane

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1474 posts in 1049 days


#14 posted 04-06-2014 12:42 AM

There’s no teak in “teak oil”, no Danes in “danish oil”, and no tongue in “tung oil.” Any oil in what’s labeled as teak oil or danish oil is gonna be linseed oil, which is only good for starting fires. And be very very skeptical of anything labeled tung oil, because it’s probably linseed oil, too. Finish manufacturers don’t go to Hell for lying.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1215 posts in 1125 days


#15 posted 04-06-2014 05:06 PM

As most of Clint’s comments or replies are trite, arrogant and inciting, I hate to agree with him, but he is correct.

Teak oil does not come from teak wood. It was created to be a restorative oil finish for wood used outdoors. Danish oil was created to easily duplicate the oil finishes of Scandinavian furniture. Most tung oil finishes contain little or no tung oil from the tung tree in China (also called China wood oil). Only products listing or being labeled as pure tung oil can be trusted to actually contain any. Depending on type and brand, all oil finishes contain linseed oil, driers, solvent and/or some type of resin.

Clint is biased in his opinion of oil finishes, so I take the rest of his comments about them with a grain of salt

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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