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Grizzly 0604X Table Parallelism Problem

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Forum topic by Matt Przybylski posted 04-03-2014 10:32 PM 645 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1126 days


04-03-2014 10:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer parallelism grizzly

Hey everyone, I’m just about at my wits end here. When I got this jointer over a year ago (almost two years ago now) I was not very good with machine setup and had no idea what I was doing. On top of that, at that point in my very young woodworking hobby, “close enough” was good enough for me. As I’ve matured as a woodworker I’ve started to dial in my machinery more consistently and “close enough” is just not good enough anymore. On my last project after jointing I noticed I didn’t have perfectly square edges so I wanted to do something about it finally this week that I’m on vacation from work.

I took my jointer apart down to the point where I can adjust the parallelism in the beds and did everything according to the instructions. the outfeed table is pretty much dead parallel to the cutterhead as confirmed by my Veritas steel straight edge (never been dropped or anything like that, I take great care of it so I know it’s accurate). I then proceeded to do the infeed table as it pertains to the outfeed table (again, as per the directions) and here is where my problem is (and pretty visible). No matter how much I adjust the eccentric bushings of this parallelogram jointer I can’t seem to get this level. At the cutterhead the infeed table touches the straight edge but the further away you get from the cutterhead it starts to dip down. I’ve check that the table is indeed flat and as far as I could tell it really is. I can’t for the life of me figure out why, when adjusting the bushings, I can only come about close enough to the point where I can still visibly see a space between the straight edge and the table (I didn’t bother with feeler gauges because I could physically see the space pretty easily).

Before I call Grizzly tomorrow and try to get them to help me I figured I’d ask here if any of you have any wisdom you could hopefully impart on me and what I may be doing wrong? Here is an exaggerated picture of my problem just so you could visually see what I’m talking about.

I really appreciate any help anyone can offer as I’m pretty desperate at this point and it’s driving me nuts.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com


10 replies so far

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 696 days


#1 posted 04-03-2014 11:56 PM

I am just shooting from the hip here, as I have never had a parallel style jointer. If I am reading you right as you try to raise the tail of the infeed you run out of cam to get it high enough. I would raise the tail of the out feed and then adjust it to the cutter head. Once you do that bay raising the tail of the out feed it should allow you enough cam on the infeed to finish the setup. I hope this helps.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

857 posts in 793 days


#2 posted 04-04-2014 12:31 AM

Which direction are you trying to raise the infeed table? Are you trying to raise the back end or lower the front end?

-- paxorion

View lumbermeister's profile

lumbermeister

105 posts in 727 days


#3 posted 04-04-2014 02:40 AM

Matt- I had a similar issue with my G0604X – see my review here http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3693 , specifically, the section titled -Adjusting Coplanarity of Tables . I think that, by adjusting the outfeed table to the cutter head, you may have caused the far end of the infeed table to be out of adjustment range to the outfeed table (Darthford, in a recent comment on another LJ’s Grizzly parallelogram jointer, noted that the cutter head should be shimmed parallel to the outfeed if need be, not the other way around). Remember that, with individual knives (as opposed to a spiral head), each knife can be adjusted to the outfeed height rather easily.

Let me know if my description of identifying and solving this issue on my G0604X needs any clarification. I think that your issue will be solved.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1126 days


#4 posted 04-04-2014 04:29 AM

@lumbermeister: that’s exactly what I’m experiencing. I had thought about mocking the out feed but was worried that I would mess it up and not be able to get it back in place and it was already set perfectly. It’s good to know that I not the only one that had this issue and that will help me solve it, gives me more confidence in modifying the out feed as well then.

Shawn, thanks for your input as well, basically said the same thing.

The cam system really is nice and easy to use on these jointers, I just got discouraged because of the fact that I didn’t have enough to compensate for the missed height. This now makes sense though and I’ll give it a shot.

My only question now is will this affect the fence in any way? I imagine the fence will be on a slight slant as well now (up higher on out feed side, lower on infeed). Is this an issue at all?

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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lumbermeister

105 posts in 727 days


#5 posted 04-04-2014 04:46 AM

Matt, from the vantage point of the wood, all that matters is that the fence is perpendicular to the tables, and that the tables are coplanar. Whether the tables and fence are parallel with the floor have no bearing on the piece being jointed so, effectively, there is no slant (again, as far as the wood is concerned) with a properly adjusted jointer.

Update – perhaps you are referring to the fence riding perpendicular to its base, but the coplanar tables occupying a plane that is skewed to that of the fence. Not an issue, as the amount of skew will be very slight.

PS – I found that aligning the holes in the base so the fence’s sliding base with the holes in the jointer bed to be a real PIA (wish the base holes were slots, open on the bottom, so I can partially insert the bolts and easily set the base slots onto them). Is your experience similar?

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3556 posts in 1561 days


#6 posted 04-04-2014 05:00 AM

Assuming you have straight knives, the knives could be set too high. If that is the case, the cams might not be able to raise the infeed table high enough. Try lowering the knives in the gib, then adjust the outfeed table even with the knives. At that point you should be able to get the infeed table parallel to the outfeed table. Aim for within .002” of being coplanar.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1126 days


#7 posted 04-04-2014 03:31 PM

Lumbermeister, that is a PIA for sure. Thanks for your help. I’ll be redoing this next time I get shop time, whenever that may be :). I’d like to go back to working wood rather than machine setup but it seems like that’s all I’m doing lately. At least I hope it will reduce frustration in the long run.

On another note, I sliced two fingers open yesterday when tightening the gib screws on the cutter head and my wrench slipped. Not fun :/

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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lumbermeister

105 posts in 727 days


#8 posted 04-04-2014 05:37 PM

Matt – sorry to hear of your sliced fingers; I did the same thing the very first time I adjusted the knives on this jointer. Since then:

- I use a wrench with a longer handle than the Grizzly-supplied item.
- I stop the tightening stroke at the end of the upward travel of the wrench handle (before it turns downward with my knuckles aiming toward the blades),

I guess the worst part of the damage was to my pride, but it took a good while to stop the bleeding.

By the way, another PIA – wow – there is barely sufficient room to place the head of the wrench in the slot between the gibbs and the cutterhead.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1126 days


#9 posted 04-04-2014 06:46 PM

Yeah, i was being careless as it was already 10PM and I had gotten frustrated by the table parallelism stuff (doesn’t every injury story start like this? :)

I’m going to be much more careful in the future, I forgot how sharp jointer knives really are apparently. It just stung initially but then didn’t hurt as it’s such a clean cut. It’s healing now, drying out and scabbing, and luckily it wasn’t in a joint location but rather by my cuticle and on the side of my thumb so I kind of lucked out there. It hurts a bit but nothing I can’t deal with. And yes, it definitely took a long time to stop the bleeding, I went through a few bandages/gloves/etc and my wife kept insisting I go to get stitches but I didn’t really feel the need as it was a pretty clean cut and not gaping wide open.

There are quite a few things on this jointer that are kind of a PITA, to be honest, but I suppose for the price it’s to be expected.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1126 days


#10 posted 04-04-2014 08:26 PM

Quick update because I think it’s definitely worth noting here: I just received a call from a Grizzly rep (apologies but I already forgot your name :\) who had seen this topic and wanted to follow up to see if there was anything they could do to help. We talked about this thread and he agreed to give the outfeed adjustment a try.

Honestly, I was quite (pleasantly) surprised that they called me and really appreciate the extra effort they are making to help out. I purchased the jointer in July of 2012 apparently so I’m well over my one year and they’re still offering to help which is definitely better customer service than a lot of companies can say they offer, even directly after a tool purchase.

I also have a bandsaw from Grizzly (the G0555LX or whatever that model is) and I’m pretty happy with it as well but I need to tune that tool also as again, I set it up a while ago before I considered machine setup to be super critical (as I do now). For a while I thought that it was just Grizzly and the quality of their tools being subpar and I had thought to myself that I wouldn’t buy another tool from them. However, after realizing it’s just my setup abilities that were lacking (the tools I’ve recently set up are spot on, like my new SawStop 3HP PCS which is extremely accurate and DID have a bit of adjusting to do to get there) and considering this episode of receiving a call after seeing this topic which was quite unexpected, my respect level for the company just went up a whole lot and I will definitely consider purchasing future tools from them.

It really is the little things that count and sometimes I don’t think companies realize how doing these little things effects their customers and their views of the company. So if you’re reading this guy who called me, thanks a lot and you’ve made a customer for life.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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