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PVC Pipe lubricant and sealant

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Forum topic by Whiskers posted 04-02-2014 02:37 AM 538 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


04-02-2014 02:37 AM

Okay guys, My stupid question of the day.

Was Playing with one of my new setups tonight. I’m running 4” DWV Pipe from my equipment closet to a central area of my garage and was playing with the a piece of pipe and a couple couplers I bought to make a thru the wall section, much like Rockler sells for $20 but of course only cost me about $5 this way. Anyway before I been trying to think of something that would make a good sealant for the pipe and fittings when I do the final assembly. I do not want to glue them permanently cause I may wish to expand/change things in the future. Well, after test fitting, sealing is not really a issue, these suckers fit together tight. Getting them apart again was like taking a trout from a bear. Now I’m thinking more lubricant to aid in putting together and taking them apart some day in the future, and if it helps seal so much the better. The first thing that came to mind was glycerin, I thought maybe that might work. I don’t really know what glycerin is, hopefully not a silicon product, but I remember it from high school chemistry and pushing glass rods in rubber stoppers.

Anyway, that what I’m doing, anyone out there got any good ideas? Would glycerine work? Where do you get glycerine? Does it have other common names it sold by?


25 replies so far

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Sawdustmaker115

279 posts in 406 days


#1 posted 04-02-2014 05:10 AM

I have no idea if this would work but if i had to do something similar with PVC i think I’d try something like Vaseline, or maybe cooking oil of some sort

-- Anthony--http://knottywoodshop.weebly.com/

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#2 posted 04-02-2014 05:33 AM

Sawdust your insane! Cooking oil wouldn’t work, it turns rancid over time, so there is a possible smell issue, and it not very viscous, but vaseline? Hmm, that might work, and I have it on hand. I would have never thought of that. It super slick, and thick, so it has both sealing and lubricating potential. It lasts forever, won’t go rancid or dry up. U have to be totally insane to think of that. GOOD WORK! It also not a silicon product. It is a oil product though. I’ll smear some on a scrap of ordinary pvc to insure it doesn’t affect it in any way.

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Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2398 days


#3 posted 04-02-2014 05:40 AM

You can buy lubricant for running wires down cable races at Home Depot. That should be slippery enough. Did you try dishwasher soap, that can be pretty slippery and should clean up pretty well.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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Paul

528 posts in 250 days


#4 posted 04-02-2014 05:43 AM

Paste wax both joints allow them to cure for at least an hour and sand them with “yes” a grocery bag, a paper grocery bag will polish both ends and allow for you to remove it later.

Paul

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#5 posted 04-02-2014 05:43 AM

Not familiar with the cable race lube, but detergent would dry up and be of no help in future dismantleing, it also has no sealing properties. Thanks though for thinking. I wasn’t aware a lubricant even existed for running wires. I haven’t needed any in the work I have done, but if it should crop up I’ll keep it in mind.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#6 posted 04-02-2014 05:45 AM

hmm, plk, that is also a valid suggestion. Would definately help for future dismantleing. Wouldn’t help seal though, but like I said, I don’t think sealing is that big a issue.

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5178 posts in 1994 days


#7 posted 04-02-2014 05:46 AM

paste wax works good. Silicone spray lubricant will also do a fine job

-- We all must start somewhere in our journey of doing what we love to do.

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Sawdustmaker115

279 posts in 406 days


#8 posted 04-02-2014 05:48 AM

Haha yeah cooking oil would= a dumb idea considering what you said

-- Anthony--http://knottywoodshop.weebly.com/

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Paul

528 posts in 250 days


#9 posted 04-02-2014 05:49 AM

The paper bag sanding will provide about a 1600 grit connection “on the cured paste wax” it should provide enough. At least in my limited experience it has.

Paul

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Paul

528 posts in 250 days


#10 posted 04-02-2014 05:52 AM

My April fools joke should also take all my credibility away ;)

Paul

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#11 posted 04-02-2014 05:53 AM

lol, actually i think I have some sandpaper on hand that fine, but I did get the idea. Paste wax is definately a big contender, it probably would help the seal some, but would also help disassemble down the road. And it does last forever.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#12 posted 04-02-2014 05:54 AM

Well, I hope your not making jokes now.

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#13 posted 04-02-2014 05:58 AM

Tomorrow I’m going to paste wax one of those couplings and my little piece of thru the wall pipe and see if it has a beneficial effect on dismantling. Will post results.

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Paul

528 posts in 250 days


#14 posted 04-02-2014 06:06 AM

Nope I’m not joking now. Just posted to my hoax April fools that I started if you want a good read. April fools is over.

Paul

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Whiskers

389 posts in 712 days


#15 posted 04-02-2014 06:10 AM

I didn’t really think you were as it actually was a good suggestion. I use jonsons paste wax for a lot of things, but hadn’t thought of it for this purpose, but can see how it would work. The wax might stick when joints first shoved together forming a little seal, but wouldn’t bind. So when pulled the little bind it had would readily break and than the parts would slide back apart easier.

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