LumberJocks

Finishing curved edges

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by John Gross posted 01-10-2009 06:03 PM 1137 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View John Gross's profile

John Gross

16 posts in 3326 days


01-10-2009 06:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m in the finishing stages of copying a beautiful antique side table and can’t figure out how to get the beading on the edges of the handle brackets on the sides of the table. I’ve tried free handing them on the router table but only managed to ruin 2 sets of handle brackets. I have the handles all turned but can’t figure out how to get the fancy edging on the curved brackets that hold the handles. Thanks for any and all help provided.

-- John


9 replies so far

View John Gross's profile

John Gross

16 posts in 3326 days


#1 posted 01-10-2009 07:49 PM

Ok, here’s a start. http://home.rr.com/jgross
The photos should be hung there. Let me know if this helps. thanks…

-- John

View John Gross's profile

John Gross

16 posts in 3326 days


#2 posted 01-10-2009 11:40 PM

No, I have the shaper/router bit that will do the full profile and yes it has a bearing on it. My problem is holding the piece while doing the curved surfaces. The bearing really has no place to ride when I’m doing curved surfaces and there’s no way to hold the curved piece steady…

-- John

View PetVet's profile

PetVet

329 posts in 3390 days


#3 posted 01-10-2009 11:59 PM

John, could you attach another piece of wood to the backside of these to hold on to? Maybe glue something on with newspaper sandwiched in between the bracket and the wood extension. That way you have more control, and when done a simple chop with a chisel will break the glue bond.

-- Rich in Richmond -- Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3639 days


#4 posted 01-11-2009 01:16 AM

This type of edging is normally done with a shaper or router using a template guide. You make a jig that will hold the template and clamps that will secure the wood in place so that it can be done safely and without destroying the piece or causing you harm. This applies to making one piece or many pieces. Sometimes it is necessary to make a couple of templates in order maneuver the work past the blade in the correct direction so as not to chip out wood. In your sample it looks like the manufacturer used a shaper cutter that was the shape of the entire edge. That way he could do the edging in one pass.

It often takes more time to set up for the project than to actually do it. It is just anormal part of working safely with machines.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View John Gross's profile

John Gross

16 posts in 3326 days


#5 posted 01-11-2009 01:23 AM

Thanks guys, I like the idea of a template for the bearing to ride on or in. I think I can cut and shape one the same shape as the handle, might even use the pieces left after band sawing the handles, fasten it, probably with glue/newspaper and try it. Any idea on how fast rpm wise the shaper ought to be to shape oak. I’m running it about 20000 rpm and it doesn’t even slow the motor. Maybe I should experiment with rpms what thinks you?

-- John

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 3338 days


#6 posted 01-11-2009 01:56 AM

you could also make a template and with double stick carpet tape (which is very strong) attach it to a scrap surface and use this as your guid with the bearing bit! it will not move but if you pull real good it will come up again! I do this all the time it is great. I hope I explained this clear enough! its late here.

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View John Gross's profile

John Gross

16 posts in 3326 days


#7 posted 01-11-2009 02:21 AM

Thanks, and yes it is late where you are. and yes I understand. I’ve gotten some wonderful suggestions on here, I like it already and haven’t been a member 10 hours yet….=)

-- John

View John Gross's profile

John Gross

16 posts in 3326 days


#8 posted 01-11-2009 09:50 PM

Well, here’s how I “got er done” as they say. Took a couple of practice pieces. I copied the outline exactly and used small screws to fasten them together so the bearing had a place to ride. The hardest part is on the ends, the sucker wants to grab real fast so you have to sort of sneak up on the ends. It worked, as usual, I’ve more time in the brackets then in the entire table so far. I’ve put some photos in the project section. Once again, a very pleasant experience for a first timer and I think I’ll hang round for awhile. Thanks.

-- John

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3670 days


#9 posted 01-11-2009 10:29 PM

you could aslo use a card scraper. and make sure not to change and key dimensions too much. thats what killed me in the first thing i tried to refinish. luckily it wasn’t a piece of importance

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com