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Float a box floor with box joint corners?

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Forum topic by LiveEdge posted 03-31-2014 09:17 PM 1747 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


03-31-2014 09:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: box joint box dado

I’m curious what the standard procedure is for putting the floor of a box in when you use box joint corners? I’ve only made a few boxes and they were simple with rabbet joints and a dado groove to float the floor. It seems like cutting the dado for the floor would be much harder with a box joint.

Advice?


21 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#1 posted 03-31-2014 09:51 PM

Do you mean finger joints? If so, variety of ways can be used to attach the bottom and dado is a good option.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#2 posted 03-31-2014 11:05 PM

Yes, finger joints. I’ve also seen them called box joints. If you cut the dado with a dado blade, how do you not have the dado exposed at some interface of the joint?

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8261 posts in 2895 days


#3 posted 03-31-2014 11:31 PM

You can either stop the dado just shy of the end of the finger or make plugs for the gap.
If you stop the dado blade, there will be a bunch of chisel work to do.
It’s a whole lot easier to use a router table.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#4 posted 03-31-2014 11:34 PM

Gene is right.. Finger joints are strong enough that you can even make decorative joints for the base using dowels or whatever to hold the base without compromising anything.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#5 posted 04-01-2014 12:47 AM

Gene is correct (as usual). I use the router table to make stopped dados but I have also cut them on the tablesaw and plugged the gaps in the corners with small wood pieces.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2044 days


#6 posted 04-01-2014 01:46 AM

Stopped dadoes on the router table is my preferred method as well.
Very easy to set up and cut.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View wb8nbs's profile

wb8nbs

162 posts in 2159 days


#7 posted 04-01-2014 02:27 AM

Get a Lee Valley Box Slotting router bit. Put it in a router table. Dry fit your box and hold with a strap clamp. Set the box over the slotting bit and run it around the inside for a perfect grrove. Works really slick. Just have to round off the corners of the top and bottom plate a bit. Will work on any kind of box that needs a floating panel.

-- The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#8 posted 04-01-2014 02:34 AM

Well, let’s say I don’t have a router table… :)

View wb8nbs's profile

wb8nbs

162 posts in 2159 days


#9 posted 04-01-2014 03:38 AM

Do you have a router? Screw it to a sheet of ply or mdf turn it over and clamp it to something.

-- The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2044 days


#10 posted 04-01-2014 04:50 AM

^What he said.
Scrap of plywood or MDF, 10 minutes, you have a router table.
Any straight board can be a fence.

Just curious; why no router table yet?
It’s probably one of the most useful shop tools one can have.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#11 posted 04-01-2014 05:25 AM

Well, no official router table primarily due to room. I’m working in a garage and the expectation is the cars can fit at the end of the day. :)

I’ll definitely set up a MDF board style table. I take it you don’t want it thick because the bit has to be long enough to still have length to cut. Correct?

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2044 days


#12 posted 04-01-2014 07:55 AM

My router table is a piece of 3/4” MDF with formica on one side and hardwood bracing underneath. The router (a porter cable 690) is bolted directly to the MDF. I’ve never had an issue with too little bit extension.

So use whatever you have around. It doesn’t even need to be big. Even 16”x16” or whatever makes a very serviceable router table. If your scrap has a cup, put the convex side up.

Here's what doug stowe ( a very talented woodworker) uses. For simplicity, I’d skip the inserts.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View wb8nbs's profile

wb8nbs

162 posts in 2159 days


#13 posted 04-01-2014 01:54 PM

Gary Rogowski uses a table like that!

-- The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#14 posted 04-08-2014 08:57 PM

Just to be clear because I now have the router upside down and I’m also standing on the “far” end of the wood, am I feeding the wood left to right or right to left?

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1130 days


#15 posted 04-10-2014 10:34 PM

Take a look at the blade. You want to feed the wood into the cutting edge of the blade. Not the same direction the cutting edge is going. The blade should be trying to push the board back towards you.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

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