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Turning template/pattern idea from an old book

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Forum topic by Rick M. posted 03-30-2014 07:06 PM 711 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rick M.

4333 posts in 1102 days


03-30-2014 07:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: turning template pattern jig lathe

I found this template idea from a late 19th century turning book. Basically a full size pattern with notches where your pencil marks go then you turn each mark down to the listed measurement. You can also add half circles the exact size that you cut out for measuring. Cut the half circles with a saw and sand to the line.

Example 1 with pattern

Example 2 for measuring. Handy but I like having the pattern.

I combined both but it’s messy and more work, I like example 1 the best.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/


14 replies so far

View quicksilver's profile

quicksilver

179 posts in 1310 days


#1 posted 03-30-2014 07:22 PM

Old books are a treasure.
The Oldtimers had the best tricks and templates.
Books are cheap and now is the right time to buy.
I’ve found many templates and setup devices in old shaper books for the router table.
Looks like you are into making tools.
Thanks for the tip on burning lines with formica.
Great work and great fun.

-- Quicksilver

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Wildwood

1176 posts in 856 days


#2 posted 03-30-2014 09:23 PM

In woodturning industry called storyboard or stick can make them as minimal or as detailed as you like.

Think can find an app for less than $20, that workd with sketch-up that will let you print plans.

-- Bill

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Roger

15051 posts in 1526 days


#3 posted 03-31-2014 12:25 PM

Old seems to always, well a lot of times, better.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

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Rick M.

4333 posts in 1102 days


#4 posted 03-31-2014 04:30 PM

Thanks Bill, storystick is a good description. I’ve seen people use a regular storystick on turnings but I haven’t seen one with the profile. But then I’m not, or around, production turners so it might be common as wood boogers.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Jim Baldwin

50 posts in 1080 days


#5 posted 04-01-2014 12:41 AM

I believe your book illustration is somewhat impracticable or perhaps conceived by someone other than a professional wood turner. This would not be the kind of typical template utilized by a 19th century pro.

A production turning template is just a board with sharpened nail points protruding along the edge where the parting tool is used. The nails leave accurate and repeatable scratch-lines on the rotating round stock (a “V” notch and pencil, is for a one-off or short order only).

The profile is also sketched on the board along with information such as style# and post size etc. The depth of the parting-tool-cut is gauged from the edge of the board to the drawn profile. Each standard turning profile required a template for every different sized spindle or post, ranging from from 2X2 to 12
12. In this way proportions of the profile are maintained.

The half-round, combination bead gauge in your picture would also be impracticable since beads are almost never arraigned so that you could use this without coming in contact with other parts of the rotating post.

This is me (40 years ago) and a few of Grandpas’ turning templates are seen hanging from the wall. He was a pro and as a boy, learned his craft from 19th century wood turners

post.

-- Jim Baldwin/jimhbaldwin@gmail.com

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Rick M.

4333 posts in 1102 days


#6 posted 04-01-2014 03:27 AM

That picture is amazing.

Idea came from a book geared toward high school students by G.A. Ross, 1909 (A tad newer than I remembered when writing the OP). I disagree about impractical since I tried it today and it works fine. I glued the pattern to a piece of 1/8” plywood and cut it out on the bandsaw. Used the notches to mark 2 blanks. With the pattern on the board I don’t have to remember or guess what it’s for, just hang it up until I need it again. I didn’t use the half circles but it would be handy instead of resetting calipers for each size or keeping a stack of calipers on hand. For me this is more practical than a board with nails in it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Wildwood

1176 posts in 856 days


#7 posted 04-01-2014 11:07 AM

Think in woodturning have to keep an open mind, scroll down to PATTERN STICK!

http://www.woodturnersresource.com/extras/lathe_terms/lathe_terms.html#patternstick

I have seen so many variations to story boards, sticks, templates and full size drawing glued to boards and cut out. Have no idea when and where any of terms mentioned all started but those terms still in use today.

Have to admit, did not know the term Pattern Stick before today.

-- Bill

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Jim Baldwin

50 posts in 1080 days


#8 posted 04-01-2014 04:12 PM

I’m just telling you the way it was…no production spindle turner would ever take the time to pick up a pencil let alone a contoured pattern stick. After the first piece or two, even the calipers are left hanging on the wall.

Grandpa spent 2 years of his life (beginning at age 12) turning the same style stair baluster. For 12 hours each day, the belt-driven, factory lathes never stopped. He was “piece-working” as were all the turners in the place. The stacks of hand-turned balusters, newel posts and furniture parts were indistinguishable from each other and had to be or were rejected on the spot. Different halves of split posts for wall mounting applications could be held together for comparison. Differences if any, are always

slight.

As a young man, I worked for Grandpa and know what I’m talking about. I still have his Porter lathes (circa 1880’s) and all his hand-made turning tools. As a professional spindle turner, I’ve never used a contoured gauge of any kind and have never seen any other turner use one either.

The contoured pattern stick and bead-gauge, is a high school, wood-shop thing.

-- Jim Baldwin/jimhbaldwin@gmail.com

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Rick M.

4333 posts in 1102 days


#9 posted 04-01-2014 04:30 PM

Actually Jim I never claimed this was for production turning and I don’t think anyone is doubting how your grandpa did things. Not all of us had a professional as teacher nor do all of us need to imitate 19th century production turners but I respect your insight. Pencils need to be sharpened and so do nails if used as scribes as they dull rather quickly.

@Wildwood:Yep, that describes it to a T. There are few things new under the sun but they can be new to me.

Yesterday I didn’t have enough measurements on my pattern stick. Not a problem for someone more experienced but it caused me some minor grief. I actually do better freehand at this point but making identical parts is my goal.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Jim Baldwin

50 posts in 1080 days


#10 posted 04-02-2014 04:21 PM

I’m just playing “know it all” as old farts often do. Hand turning today is mostly a hobby and has little resemblance to the sweatshop work of the past. It’s interesting and educational to look back but we should all be thankful we don’t have to go back there.

-- Jim Baldwin/jimhbaldwin@gmail.com

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Wildwood

1176 posts in 856 days


#11 posted 04-02-2014 06:32 PM

I had a horrible time getting three stool legs to almost match turning freehand. Then screwed up drilling stretcher holes and had to start again. By & by got good at turning three & four stools legs. Did not have that much trouble with table legs.

Worked at place that had couple different size Vega copying lathes. We used a template following tool. There is a learning curve to cutting templates, setting up those machines and turning on them. I felt more like a machine operator. Also turned one off parts for antique & reproduction furniture freehand on another lathe they had. Guy I worked for made his real money buying, selling, & fixing machines used in furniture industry.

-- Bill

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Rick M.

4333 posts in 1102 days


#12 posted 04-02-2014 06:44 PM

Very true.

So, I finished my 4th one and the pattern helps but I’m still not getting them perfectly the same mostly on the very ends, that’s just a matter of practice though. I learned quickly you can’t just cut all the lines down to size and go, you have to think about which side of the line gets the cut or sections come out too small. For example on a slope you need to cut downhill of the line, but split the line on a transition.

Having those half circles would be handy dandy. I might pick up a couple of these things and cut them half.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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TheDane

3935 posts in 2385 days


#13 posted 04-02-2014 07:44 PM

I use this when I am roughing out a spindle …

It is just a piece of 1/4” plywood that I drilled holes in with forstner bits, then ripped in half. Crude, but it gets me close.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Rick M.

4333 posts in 1102 days


#14 posted 04-02-2014 08:10 PM

That’s perfect Gerry, wish I had a whole set of Forstner bits.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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