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Titebond wood filler as grain filler?

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Forum topic by Bieser posted 118 days ago 602 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bieser

175 posts in 633 days


118 days ago

So I am building a arts and crafts table out of white oak. While playing around with finish options today on some scraps I decided to use Titebond wood filler over a piece, sanded it smooth and stained it. I was surprised by the look. I didn’t see any adverse effect on the stain I was using and it provided a much smoother finish.

Any of you guys tried this stuff in this capacity? I figure its like grain filling.

I am thinking about watering it down and trying it a little more runny.

Any thoughts.

B


12 replies so far

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 354 days


#1 posted 118 days ago

I’m interested in this stuff, too. Any feedback would be appreciated.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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RussellAP

2938 posts in 885 days


#2 posted 118 days ago

Take some pictures.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 354 days


#3 posted 118 days ago

Here’s a pic of the product:

If it were available at my local Rockler (San Diego) I would just go buy some to try, but it’s not.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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RussellAP

2938 posts in 885 days


#4 posted 118 days ago

It might help to add a bit of TB 2 or 3 to help make it more plyable, I wouldn’t use water. The hard part is to get it to stick in the hole and by adding some fresh glue to the mix, it seems to adhere better while you trowel it in.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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woodchuckerNJ

865 posts in 232 days


#5 posted 118 days ago

RussellAp: But then it would not stain very well.

-- Jeff NJ

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RussellAP

2938 posts in 885 days


#6 posted 118 days ago

I rarely use a wood filler. I use some sawdust from the wood i’m using and TB2. Never had an issue with small spots and stain. It might look a bit different, but usually the top coat helps it blend in. I can never get that puddy to stick in the hole because it’s too thick and not sticky enough. By adding some TB2 to the hole first, then putting in the either puddy or sawdust mixed with glue you can get it to adhere much better. TB makes a dark and light glue, plus they have a transparent glue which I haven’t tried yet. You almost have to be a painter to get the color just right.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Bieser

175 posts in 633 days


#7 posted 118 days ago

I am not sure about the tb in it either might try it on some scrap. I was thinking about mixing it with a water based dye stain. Titebond says its water based. I have used it on a couple projects and was impressed with its ability to take stain.

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Bieser

175 posts in 633 days


#8 posted 118 days ago

I would say distilled water would probably be ok. When I opened it first time it was very watery.

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 354 days


#9 posted 118 days ago

I’m particularly interested in this for a pine piece where I might — might — have made a boo-boo or twelve. Bieser says it takes stain well, and that’s interesting. Mixing TB2 with sawdust is not a good combination for staining.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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Bieser

175 posts in 633 days


#10 posted 113 days ago

I have been playing around with this stuff a little. I have never had wood filler take stain like this stuff does. I cut a groove in a piece of wood and filled it with filler just to see how well it takes stain and it stains right over it. It really was impressive. I would recommend trying it out decent stuff really. I am using General Finishes water based stain.

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dawsonbob

381 posts in 354 days


#11 posted 113 days ago

Okay, ya got me. I’ll order some from Amazon. The stuff itself isn’t all that expensive, but with shipping it isn’t cheap. The shipping costs more than the wood filler.

Update: I just ordered some and the shipping wasn’t as bad as I thought. The entire order came to only $10.24. I’ll let everyone know what I think once it gets here.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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Blackie_

3290 posts in 1111 days


#12 posted 113 days ago

I’ve never used any type of wood filler, well not until I discovered a simple trick, what I do is fill the void with titebond glue wipe access off then using #150 or close to it sand paper, sand the area around the damaged area allowing the sawdust to fall into the hole on top of the glue it covers the hole and makes it look as though there was never a damaged area there. Another thing you can do if it’s a very big damaged area pour the titebond onto a piece of wax paper then using the very same sawdust from the wood you are working with pour enough onto the puddle of glue while using a Popsicle stick mix it into a thick paste you’ll have to create the saw dust this will create the wood filler matching the wood you are working with.

I may have misunderstood the question.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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