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Smoothing/deburring planer bed?

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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 148 days ago 491 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

421 posts in 735 days


148 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have a DeWalt 734 planer, and I love it. For a relatively cheap lunchbox it’s kind of a beast, and since I don’t have a jointer it also does face-jointing with a sled. And that’s where I screwed up. I was flattening some cherry by countersinking screws through a piece of plywood; where the cherry was warped high, there was a gap between the sled and the board (bridged by the screw). Unfortunately, the screw threads didn’t bite into the plywood as well as I expected, and the rollers pushed the screws out – leaving a few gouge streaks in my planer bed and feed tables.

I don’t really care about the cosmetic damage, but the gouges effectively are like lines of burrs running all the way through the beds. So now when I use the planer, they dig into the underside of the board and leave streaks that look similar to what you get when you plane a board using chipped knives.

Any advice on how best to deburr/smooth out the beds? Thanks!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


17 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

646 posts in 800 days


#1 posted 147 days ago

You might try a stone. If that doesn’t take them down you’ll probably be ahead replacing the table.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5078 posts in 2340 days


#2 posted 147 days ago

Maybe a bit of filing or sand paper would even the burrs out. The metal of these decks is not super hard so should sand pretty well. You may have to pay special attention for rusting in the sanded area but if you are waxing you tables anyway that shouldn’t be a problem.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

3773 posts in 483 days


#3 posted 147 days ago

How about a random orbit sander with like 320 grit. Then a coat of wax.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1245 posts in 996 days


#4 posted 147 days ago

I’d probably take a 10-12” square granite-type tile (I have a couple I got for $2-3 at HD for attaching sandpaper to for sharpening) and apply a sheet of fine (maybe 400-grit, depending on the bur size) to it, then just rub it back and forth on the bed to remove the burrs, letting the weight of the tile do the work. Since it’s a 12.5” planer, it’ll make sure you sand the entire bed evenly.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

421 posts in 735 days


#5 posted 147 days ago

Thanks all. It looks like I’ve got a lot of options short of the drastic step of replacing everything. I already made some progress hand sanding with 200 to 400 grit paper; I’ll try taking an ROS to it and then smoothen with a diamond file or stone. Once I’ve got the burrs out, I’ll do a test run to make sure wood still runs through flat and square. If it doesn’t, I’ll try the 12” tile idea.

And I suppose this is just the kick in the pants I need to make sure I wax my beds regularly.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Mark E.'s profile

Mark E.

376 posts in 2369 days


#6 posted 147 days ago

If the above suggestions don’t work, you could add an auxiliary bed to cover the original.

-- Mark

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1245 posts in 996 days


#7 posted 147 days ago

You could post it on Craigslist for $400.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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firefighterontheside

3773 posts in 483 days


#8 posted 147 days ago

He could and then we’ll see it on the ‘Craigslist posters have gone crazy” thread.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

421 posts in 735 days


#9 posted 147 days ago

Considering I got it for $250 “used” (i.e. purchased and hoarded in an unopened box for five years), I think I’m going to try some home remedies before asking $400 on Craigslist.

If I can’t get the scratches out I may give serious thought to an auxiliary bed, and maybe even extend my in and outfeed tables. But hopefully I can at least smooth the burrs.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Allen4's profile

Allen4

9 posts in 149 days


#10 posted 147 days ago

I am trying to resurface an aluminum bed covered in stainless steel sheet .3mm thick. The corner has lifted and junk has gotten under, so I am going to resurface it with either stainless or mild steel sheet contact cemented on. I would think about grinding the high parts flush with light sand paper and resurfacing to cover the low gouges. If you sand them out you won’t have a flat table anymore. doesn’t have to be thick I think I’m going with 22 gauge mild steel

View unbob's profile

unbob

381 posts in 530 days


#11 posted 147 days ago

The first response is the correct one. Dress the burrs with a stone. Narrow gouges left from screw points will have no effect on the machine performance, once the burrs are removed.
Always, resist using wood working tools to repair machines, or other metal objects that have been machined, such as sanding, ect.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

421 posts in 735 days


#12 posted 147 days ago

Can you recommend a stone for the job? Thanks.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View unbob's profile

unbob

381 posts in 530 days


#13 posted 147 days ago

Any small common sharpening stone should work fine. Just work the area that is effected, right on the edges of the gouges, it can be felt when using a stone when the burrs are knocked down.
Perhaps the above image will be of some comfort. The planer is a 16” out of a school. At some point, it appears a board with large nails or screws was run through it, leaving the pretty deep gouges. It works perfectly anyway.

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ADHDan

421 posts in 735 days


#14 posted 147 days ago

Thanks! And yes, that’s exactly what my planer looks like. I wasn’t really concerned that the scratches would screw up the “flatness” of the beds for purposes of keeping boards parallel, I just don’t want to gouge my lumber. I’m glad to hear I’m not the first one with this experience.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

717 posts in 562 days


#15 posted 147 days ago

I bet you can get it out with some sort of abrasive, whether it be files, stones, or sandpaper. I’d give it a whack. I would be surprised if the bed was ruined all together.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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