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Advice needed on stripping a Carved Panel

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Forum topic by NJBirdman posted 03-26-2014 01:07 AM 446 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NJBirdman

23 posts in 819 days


03-26-2014 01:07 AM

Alright so I haven’t been the most productive lumber jock. I am a troll who looks at the site every day but never comments and rarely posts, my apologies.

I am currently attempting to turn a 100+ year old piano into a blanket chest. I have stripped all the pieces of their original stain and finish which I can only assume was shellac.? This has involved a large jug of zip strip, a 5 in one, various scrapers, and a decent bit of sanding. The piano has three nicely carved panels which I intend to use. Initially the thought was to leave these with the original stain and shellac since it is in decent shape. All of the other pieces are stripped of their original finish though and now I’m thinking maybe it would be nice to freshen up the panels. The part that scares me is getting in to the stripping process and not being able to do a consistent/thorough job. The relief on these carvings is not huge at its highest point and at its lowest goes down to 1/16”. I really don’t want to loose/destroy the carving, but wouldn’t mind having a more uniform look for the finished piece. Here are some pics if anyone has any advice good, bad, or for the love of god don’t touch them let me know. Thanks everyone and I promise to be a better lumberjock in the future.

-- --Denver-- Any society that will give up a little liberty for a little security will deserve neither and lose both.


7 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

5836 posts in 605 days


#1 posted 03-26-2014 02:06 AM

I would say apply the stripper, wait the appropriate time and then use a toothbrush on the carvings.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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lunn

207 posts in 1057 days


#2 posted 03-26-2014 09:29 AM

Try useing Kutzit liquid stripper, by far the best stripper i’ve used. Toothbrush or a soft brass brush.

-- What started as a hobbie is now a full time JOB!

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dhazelton

1269 posts in 1045 days


#3 posted 03-26-2014 12:24 PM

0000 steel wool dipped into a dish of the liquid stripper. Start to rub in small circles and the finish will dissolve nicely. Wipe with a clean rag. You shouldn’t even need to sand the thing. If you use a paste stripper that needs to be scraped off you will mess up the carving, which may not even be real wood. A lot of times that stuff is a sawdust glue mixture that was molded.

When you are done stripping a panel then you can try to match the new wood with stains.

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NJBirdman

23 posts in 819 days


#4 posted 03-26-2014 12:59 PM

Thanks guys. It sounds like liquid stripper is the way to go. Upon closer inspection of the carvings, I can see the grain so I’m thinking they are real wood. Thank you for the information fellas.

-- --Denver-- Any society that will give up a little liberty for a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

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RWAARM

65 posts in 628 days


#5 posted 03-26-2014 01:41 PM

CAN’T WAIT TO SEE THE FINISHED PIECE. LOOKS BEAUTIFUL.

-- RITA, INDIANA-RWAARM@YAHOO.COM

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NJBirdman

23 posts in 819 days


#6 posted 03-26-2014 02:07 PM

I will definetly post the completed project. It may take me another 2 months thought!

-- --Denver-- Any society that will give up a little liberty for a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

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Finisherman

210 posts in 597 days


#7 posted 03-26-2014 05:13 PM

Liquid stripper would work well here. Here’s another idea. Mix equal amounts of denatured alcohol and lacquer thinner and apply the mixture liberally with either a synthetic abrasive pad or a pad of steel wool. When the finish is gone, just wet a rag in clean solvent and wipe down the surface. This mixture will quickly strip the shellac and it won’t require an after wash, like stripper does. The downsides are that this process is slower and somewhat more labour intensive than using stripper and the fumes are noxious, as well as flammable. Do the job outside, if possible, or be sure to have good ventilation.

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