LumberJocks

lost on a simple inlay

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodcarving forum

Forum topic by BubingaBill posted 03-25-2014 09:31 PM 1081 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


03-25-2014 09:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig walnut router

Hi again gang,
I have a solid walnut case I’m building and I need to inlay WM into the lid. Making it even more simple I will put the “W” on top of the “M” making it look like a design. But I am lost as to how to cut this into the center of the lid. I have cut border inlays before on my table saw and where the inlay crossed at the corners I covered it with decorative brass corner protectors.
I have a router and can purchase small straight cut bits to get the width of 1/8” and I can chisel the ends to be square. But I don’t have a clue how to cut straight lines without any deflection. I know I can’t do this by hand. Does any know of a simple jig I can build to cut 3” long shallow slots?
I am also worried about the edges tearing out. I don’t want to fill in the edges with wood putty. Maybe a specific bit is needed??
Any help is greatly appreciated!!!
Thanks again,
Bill

I have hopes of building one of those router pantographs some day but I don’t think I need something so elaborate for simple lines. Or do I???

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!


13 replies so far

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2388 days


#1 posted 03-25-2014 09:45 PM

Have you considered Double Bevel Inlay?

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


#2 posted 03-25-2014 09:51 PM

Jim,
Seeing that I don’t know what that is I would have to say no. Please explain!

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1671 days


#3 posted 03-25-2014 09:56 PM

The simple answer is:

There is a attachment called an inlay kit it goes in the router base plate an has a removable bush for making the recess and the insert.

It come with its own router it.

Works very well.

You will need to use a lettering template or similar as a guide and you are away!

-- Regards Robert

View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


#4 posted 03-25-2014 10:08 PM

I will look it up.
Thank you!!!

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1671 days


#5 posted 03-25-2014 10:13 PM

Here is a picture for you to check out.

-- Regards Robert

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#6 posted 03-25-2014 11:57 PM

If you have “islands” in the inlay as I’m sure you do, the inlay set want do. Well, it can be made to but it will be a lot of trouble and not a single simple pattern.
Have a look at this jig. Used with a small bit it will accurately place straight lines all day long and it is very simple.
I used it for the straight lines on this table top and trust me, I didn’t want to screw that up.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2388 days


#7 posted 03-26-2014 12:22 AM

You can do an internet search for “Double bevel Inlay” It is done 100% with a scroll saw , glue and a sander. This is how I do it: I use 3/8” cedar and inlay 3/8” soft maple into it. I also use have used oak, walnut, and maple. I have used mahogany a few times also. I have one of my scroll saws set to 2.2 degrees, approximately, that I use only for inlays. I set my angle with a Wixie but you can also do it by trail and error and it is just as good a way to do it. Stack the two woods you want to use, scraps. Do some trial cuts starting at 2 degrees and adjusting up until you get the fit needed. Start at the edge and cut out the shape of a mushroom, freehand, and see how it fits. With the table tilted down on the left of the blade and keeping the image you want to inlay to the right of the blade make your mushroom cut and see how well the bottom wood fits into the upper wood after it is cut. If it will not go all the way up you need to lessen the angle and if the bottom wood comes up to high you need to sharpen the angle closer to 3 degrees. I move mine about two tenths of a degree at a time. Remember a little too loose a fit is better than too tight a fit.

I inlay into cedar mostly and if it is too tight a fit and I try hammering it in place with a plastic hammer I split the cedar. Perfect fit can be attained with many trial and error mushrooms. I leave most of mine just a little loose and fill any slight gaps with a mixture of white glue and sanding powder of the base wood. Cedar in my case. I use Flying Dutchman Polar #5 blades but whatever you use be consistent.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


#8 posted 03-27-2014 08:33 PM

Thanks for the input but my issue is (so far) not with fitting veneers together. Rather it’s how to carve out the area for the inlays. I have a 1/4” thick piece of walnut for the top of my box lid. I have never inlayed anything in the center of a piece of wood before and I’m looking for advice on how to do this. I think “Shipwright” is the closest as far as what I’m looking for.
It looks like it is a zero clearance jig for routing a slot. I could use some suggestions on router bits for this.
Thanks!

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


#9 posted 03-27-2014 08:34 PM

Rob,
Do you have any links that show how your kit is used? Seeing the parts only adds to my confusion.
Thanks

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


#10 posted 03-27-2014 08:46 PM

Shipwright,
That table is amazing!! Far beyond my humble skills. I’m thinking and starting small and simple to match my beginner skill set.

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#11 posted 03-27-2014 11:07 PM

The point I was trying to make was that I trusted that little jig to inlay the straight lines for the holly … after all the rest was done. It performed perfectly as did the one actually shown in that blog entry which is just the same principle but for cutting radius curves.

I started out in marquetry using a router jig like the one Rob has. It will do a great job on whole areas but becomes much more difficult if you have any “islands” like the middle of an “O” , “P” or “D”. M’s and N’s don’t have any islands but would if you superimpose them. Cutting one line at a time carefully with the little straight line jig will get it done.

I use a spiral upcut bit.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View BubingaBill's profile

BubingaBill

290 posts in 1151 days


#12 posted 03-27-2014 11:19 PM

That sounds good. Should I cut the entire thing and then do the inlay or complete one line at a time?

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

View shipwright's profile (online now)

shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#13 posted 03-28-2014 04:37 AM

I’d do some practising on scrap and see what works best for you.
My gut feeling is that it might be best to do a line at a time and glue in that piece before going on to the next. Then you wouldn’t be leaving any little “islands ” unsupported, but try a couple on scraps and get some comfort with it.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com