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Hollowing out plain sawn wood. which side?

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Forum topic by fazhou posted 03-23-2014 04:49 PM 672 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fazhou

8 posts in 1057 days


03-23-2014 04:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question cherry

Hello all,
A quick question. I want to make a violin holding cradle out of a 6/4 piece of plain sawn cherry. The cradle will be in the general shape of a violin and carved out to accommodate the violin arch. I know that if plain sawn wood cups it acts kinda like the growth rings want to straighten out (even though thats not actually what happens). Which side of my cradle should I hollow in order to minimize cupping? Growth rings convex side or concave side? Thanks for your time.


9 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3177 days


#1 posted 03-23-2014 08:29 PM

If the wood is dried and then finished will it really cup that much so as to affect the cradling effect? Wood wants to swell across its width so on plain sawn wood… You’ve asked a really good question and I thought I had an answer for you but now that I’ve started to think about it I realize I am not sure. Looking forward to better responses than mine :-) !

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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fazhou

8 posts in 1057 days


#2 posted 03-23-2014 09:27 PM

Thanks for the attempt Mark. I do appreciate your time. I’m not so concerned about the cradling effect but rather the cradle spinning willy nilly on the workbench. In the grand scheme of things is this a major deal? Not really but if I can do it the “correct” way, why not?

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Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3177 days


#3 posted 03-23-2014 09:36 PM

What process would cause the cradle to spin while you were working on it? If you’ve got it clamped down you shouldn’t have any problems with wood movement which is a relatively slowish process in comparison to the length of time the project will be on the workbench (okay your workbench…on my bench wood may actually take root again before I get a project out the door:-) .

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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fazhou

8 posts in 1057 days


#4 posted 03-23-2014 11:49 PM

Not any process specifically but for example, purling, scraping, laying out f holes etc etc. I mean just spinning because the bottom is convex. Like a giant “spin top”.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#5 posted 03-24-2014 12:04 AM

Wood cups toward the bark side. It is counter-intuitive, but that is the way it is. Look at the growth rings. Imagine a tree with that cross-section. The side that the bark would be on is the way the wood will cup.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3177 days


#6 posted 03-24-2014 12:14 AM

I get it now, the cradle is for while you are WORKING on the violin, not just displaying it….it took me far too long to catch on to that LOL!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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fazhou

8 posts in 1057 days


#7 posted 03-24-2014 01:21 AM

Danny, I appreciate your time thanks. I know about the wood cupping towards the bark side (see my original post), so….if I hollow out one side or the other will it accentuate or minimize the cupping? No worries Mark.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7922 posts in 1845 days


#8 posted 03-24-2014 05:03 AM

Cupping is influenced by the amount of moisture entering and leaving. Most common reason for cup post kiln is uneven finishing or airflow. I can’t say with authority but my instinct is that hollowing will not induce nor minimize cup to any significant degree.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#9 posted 03-24-2014 12:03 PM

Fazhou. You are right about your comment in the original post. I would think that hollowing out the bark side wood relieve some of the stress that results from uneven drying that leads to the cup in the first place.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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