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Forum topic by sphayden posted 03-23-2014 02:36 PM 792 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sphayden

32 posts in 1036 days


03-23-2014 02:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question cherry greene and greene joining

Any ideas how to repair this chip in the shoulder of one of the rails on a cherry bed I am making? Thanks for the input.


12 replies so far

View barringerwoodworks's profile

barringerwoodworks

208 posts in 460 days


#1 posted 03-23-2014 04:06 PM

Can you just plane or sand it out? Doesn’t look like you’d lose too much thickness and it could easily be graduated over some of the length of the rail without anybody noticing.

Possible to place the chipped side of the rail on the inside of bed frame?

If neither of those work, my favorite fix is making my own filler out of sanding dust from whatever wood is being filled, and glue. Only problem with that is it ends up looking more like the color of end grain rather than the face grain like you have here.

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA https://barringerwoodworks.squarespace.com

View Mark's profile

Mark

488 posts in 723 days


#2 posted 03-23-2014 04:31 PM

I’ve sorta done the same thing once or twice. Touched the edge of a project with the router that kinda thing. Cut a small flat piece of cherry,trace it out over the blemish with a razor (X-acto) knife and remove the blemish with a sharp chisel. Glue the small flt piece in place, wait till the glue has set and trim it down with a chisel and sand paper. My father in law used to call it a “dutchman”. You want to make it just a bit thicker than needed and just a bit of a bevel on the sides so it kinda wedges in place. I hope this makes sense.

-- Mark

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Loren

7822 posts in 2396 days


#3 posted 03-23-2014 04:44 PM

Mark’s approach makes sense. That’s what I would do.

Another way to go is use colored oil putty after the finish is
on. After waxing it won’t be that noticeable if you match
the color.

You can do a little thing to try to avoid that problem in
the future: gently knock off the corners with fine
sandpaper just a tiny bit. This takes away that hard
edge that can get caught on a tool or another piece
of wood and peel up.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Ben's profile

Ben

302 posts in 1078 days


#4 posted 03-23-2014 05:07 PM

Mark has the answer here, that is definitely what I would do. Try to find a piece of scrap that has close to the same grain pattern and the fix will be nearly invisible. No one will ever notice it but you.

-- Welcome to downtown Coolsville, Population: US! --Hogarth Hughes

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2038 posts in 1241 days


#5 posted 03-23-2014 05:38 PM

Another vote for gluing a small piece in, and then sand smooth. It will be all but invisible.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

896 posts in 382 days


#6 posted 03-23-2014 05:58 PM

If you can find a match to the grain I would just splice a new piece in. you take a piece cut it to size, then knife the place for it to go, and take a chisel and remove the piece. it can be much better than filler if you can match it.

-- Jeff NJ

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112886 posts in 2325 days


#7 posted 03-23-2014 10:28 PM

Unless your very very good at patching I would sand or plane the whole board down below the defect or add a small inlay on all of the same locations on your bed that will look like a design element maybe a half a diamond ,dovetail or just drill a circle with a forestner bit and put a different color circle inlay in it. The best way to hide a defect is to accent it:)

photo found on line

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

444 posts in 1831 days


#8 posted 03-23-2014 10:59 PM

Jim nailed it.

If it was me, I’d rout out about 1/3rd of a fairly large circle 3/16” deep that comes within about a 1/2” of the top and bottom edge. I’d fill it with the same cherry your using, but run the grain perpendicular to the rail.

Circle or a half diamond….large or small. Depends on the design of the bed.

-- Wisdom begins in wonder. Socrates

View sphayden's profile

sphayden

32 posts in 1036 days


#9 posted 03-24-2014 01:52 AM

Thanks for the ideas. I’ll post a picture when I get it fixed.

View sphayden's profile

sphayden

32 posts in 1036 days


#10 posted 09-23-2014 01:39 AM

I finally finished the project. This is a picture of the repair finished and unfinished. Not too bad. I think the glue left a line on the seam. Only I will know.

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

5286 posts in 1325 days


#11 posted 09-23-2014 01:58 AM

Blends right in there, good job sphayden.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

5836 posts in 605 days


#12 posted 09-23-2014 01:20 PM

You did a fine job. Only you and I will know. :-))

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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