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NEW PROBLEM WITH BAND SAW BEARINGS

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Forum topic by Charlie75 posted 161 days ago 425 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie75

232 posts in 898 days


161 days ago

This is a repost of a post that I added to a rather long existing thread.

NEW DAY NEW PROBLEM…..oK people….I got the lower shaft and bearings out. Progress??? Not necessarily. The bearing on the pulley end came off the shaft with no problem. The bearing on the wheel end (opposite the pulley) slides about half way over the threads and will not come any further. I looked at the threads on the end of the shaft with a magnifying glass and noticed that the threads are about half flattened. There are some severe marks on the outside of the bearing that looks like the PO put those bearings on with a punch or something like that. I could probably drive the bearing off the shaft but will no doubt do serious damage to the threads on the shaft. Or I can attempt to break the bearing apart some how and remove it in pieces.

I did notice that these bearings appear to have been replaced. They are stamped “Japan” with a number that I can’t read. The upper bearings were original with the correct part numbers.

I did notice that when I removed the nut on the wheel end of the shaft that I had to turn it off with a wrench all the way to the end. Either way the threads are damaged. If they were a normal thread there would be no problem. I would simply run a die over the threads and clean them up. These are fine threads and I don’t know anyone who has one of those.
Any suggestions greatly appreciated. I am beginning to think my $50. investment was no bargain.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto


11 replies so far

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

166 posts in 165 days


#1 posted 161 days ago

Might want to look into that that spindle will cost. If the threads are buggered up you will have to chase the threads or replace the unit

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3098 posts in 1308 days


#2 posted 161 days ago

Clean the threads up with a thread file. Don’t break the bearing open to remove it. You will still have to deal with the inner race and it is small. Take the parts to someone with an arbor press and pay them to remove the old bearing and possible install the new bearings. Sounds like the last guy didn’t and see what he has done to you. You are okay with the shaft. Get the new bearings installed and move forward. You are worrying about nits…nit picking.. and could be cutting wood.
As long as the nut tightens you are good to go.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

477 posts in 832 days


#3 posted 161 days ago

What Granpa said.. and while you could take it to a machine shop or use an arbor press, as an alternative, support the shaft by the bearing in a vice or similar and then whack on the end of the shaft with a wooden mallet or block of wood and a hammer. Make sure you have something under it to catch the shaft as it comes out. You don’t want to hold the bearing with the vice, just open it enough to lett the shaft pass through the jaws so the bearing is sitting on top of them and the shaft is free to drop out. A bearing puller would work as well if you have one, but it would need some farily long arms to reach down that far on the shaft. Once off, clean up the threads with a file. Application of a little heat and/or penetrating oil wouldn’t hurt either.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

232 posts in 898 days


#4 posted 160 days ago

Thank you both Grandpa and Brad. I’ll get that sucker off of there one way or another. I do have a bearing puller and it’s arms are fairly long. That PO didn’t do my any favors.

Oh, what’s a thread file? would my local Ace hardware have one? I learn something new every day on here.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

477 posts in 832 days


#5 posted 160 days ago

They make specalized files for cleaning up threads, but you can get by with a small rat tail file that has a thin edge, or one of those small triangular files. No need to get too fancy, just as long as you can put the nut back on.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

998 posts in 768 days


#6 posted 160 days ago

If need parts might check with Louis Iturra, no web site and not sure of the phone number these days.

-- Bill

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1207 posts in 1070 days


#7 posted 160 days ago

A little heat on the bearing race might help too.

As for cleaning the threads if you have a Harbor Freight nearby, you might try these files. I use them to clean up threads and sharpen my router and Forster bits. One of HF’s gems.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

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Grandpa

3098 posts in 1308 days


#8 posted 160 days ago

Heat on the inner race wouldn’t hurt. don’t get carried away and get the shaft too warm. a thread file is normally a square file that has different width teeth on each side and each end. A small triangular file would work but be careful to not take extra off the threads. The files shown from HF would work if they are as small as they appear. A rat tail file is round and tapered so I don’t see how that would work unless you have some really large threads. The main thing is the nut will go on and tighten when you are finished. If it tightens and you believe it will meet the torque requirements then it is good. It isn’t like you take this nut off every week.

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MrUnix

477 posts in 832 days


#9 posted 160 days ago

Yeah, I call it a rat tail but the one I have is more shaped like an oval with thin edges.. (rounded in the middle and coming to a fairly sharp point at the edges). I guess it’s more of a needle file. Great for cleaning up corners and getting into narrow areas such as machined threads. But like Gramps says, as long as you can get the nut on and tightened, you are good to go however you achieve it!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

232 posts in 898 days


#10 posted 160 days ago

Thanks you guys. I’ll be working on this thing tomorrow. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

232 posts in 898 days


#11 posted 159 days ago

tefinn HF does have some gems ok. I know there is a lot of prejudice against them but none the less some of there stuff is fine. Especially for the hobbyist among us. There are a few things I would not buy from them. My DC I have had for over 2 years and it’s still running strong.
I actually have two HF stores here in town. Both within about a 30 minuet drive.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

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