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Bevel cuts in 1"+ boards by hand?

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Forum topic by DustyCellist posted 03-21-2014 02:29 AM 3648 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DustyCellist

71 posts in 995 days


03-21-2014 02:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig trick pine carving joining shaping

Is there a hand tool or method (or jig) for making bevel cuts in lumbar? I used a mitre box/saw on some white pine and almost destroyed the box (and got quite a workout), ended up finishing the cut with a coping saw.

Before circular saw blades were invented, how would carpenters make bevels? Or woodworkers?

Or would they have been carved and not cut?


21 replies so far

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3564 days


#1 posted 03-21-2014 03:11 AM

I’m not sure I’m understanding what you are trying to do. Can you post a photo?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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barringerfurniture

223 posts in 1178 days


#2 posted 03-21-2014 03:11 AM

I’m not sure about a tool or method besides maybe a shop-made jig. But there’s a lot I don’t know!

I have a feeling part of the answer has to do with your state of mind. I mean that in our modern age, we’ve gotten used to super-precise, perfectly executed joints -all these pretty pictures all over the internet of perfect dovetails, perfects miters, etc.

I would rather see honest, hand-cut joinery any day (gaps and all), than perfectly machined ones.

I truly think those minor inaccuracies make it more beautiful. But that’s just my opinion.

-- Scott Barringer, Sacramento, CA barringerfinefurniture.com

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DustyCellist

71 posts in 995 days


#3 posted 03-21-2014 03:45 AM

I am not joining, I’m making toy cars. A bunch of these with my 8 year old son for a school project about American Pioneers.

 photo IMG_0274_zpsc3fba477.jpg

That windshield is what’s giving me pause… I know I could turn the board sideways and scribe a line and use a hand saw straight down, but I feel like it’s possible to do it another way… there must be an instance where that’s not possible – lets say in a dado channel for some reason you want it to bevel out so a shelf makes a whole face? (not a great example but maybe you understand what I’m trying to describe)

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JohnChung

372 posts in 1541 days


#4 posted 03-21-2014 06:45 AM

I would use a back saw. In my case it would be a dozuki saw. With a spine on the saw it would not flex. Then place a guide on top of the work piece. Saw the bevel by placing the side of the saw on the guide. The guide on top must be of the same bevel of you cut.

If you need to create a guide just mark it and plane it to the lines. It will work fine. After that use the guide to saw the bevel.

I generally saw when the piece is thick. When not too thick I plane it to the lines.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#5 posted 03-21-2014 10:49 AM

A sharp chisel should work fine for that. Mark the line on the top and sides then whack away, keeping a bit proud of the line. Then pare it with only hand pressure.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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WibblyPig

168 posts in 2741 days


#6 posted 03-21-2014 12:11 PM

What kind of miterbox did you use? My big Stanley would do those all day long.

-- Steve, Webster Groves, MO "A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2085 days


#7 posted 03-21-2014 12:57 PM

Check out boxes on mitrebox of your dreams thread. most any of them would do that cut, easy peasy. A decent vintage mb can be had for $50, and for those cuts on small stock it’s a much safer situation than a SCM.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1116 posts in 2592 days


#8 posted 03-21-2014 01:18 PM

if you are only making a few and want to get it done without a lot more fuss… make one as best you can and glue 220 sand paper to it… turn upside down and sand away any saw marks on every one after. you wont loose your angle.. the bevel will stay flat and you have already saved some time on sanding for a painted surface.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View JayT's profile

JayT

4786 posts in 1677 days


#9 posted 03-21-2014 01:20 PM

I used a mitre box/saw on some white pine and almost destroyed the box (and got quite a workout)

+1 to Steve. What saw/miter box combo did you use? The inexpensive plastic boxes and saws from the BORG are almost worthless. A good quality one shouldn’t have an issue. I finally got one of those, but prior, I have been using John’s method and have gotten good results. A good, sharp handsaw shouldn’t have an issue cutting that bevel in pine.

Either way, the cut can be cleaned up with a donkey ear shooting board and hand plane.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View DustyCellist's profile

DustyCellist

71 posts in 995 days


#10 posted 03-21-2014 03:39 PM

Thanks for all the replies, guys! I’m clearly quite a novice and I’m glad I finally joined here – I appreciate the privilege of surrounding myself with those who know much more than I do!

Yes, it was the $15 yellow box/blade combo. I suppose it might work for light baseboards…

I’m not sure where to go for woodworking tools around here. The big orange store has some basic carpentry equipment, but nothing for woodworking. They have a few bucks brother’s planes (topping out at $40) cheap chisels and cheaper saws.

Thanks for the tips on the chisels and plane! Sounds like the answer I was looking for!

View Richard's profile

Richard

1907 posts in 2157 days


#11 posted 03-21-2014 03:58 PM

What area are you located in ? Someone here may know of a better source for tools than the Big Box.

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DustyCellist

71 posts in 995 days


#12 posted 03-21-2014 03:59 PM

I’m in suburbia just north of Philadelphia (I went to the big box in Willow Grove)

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JayT

4786 posts in 1677 days


#13 posted 03-21-2014 04:12 PM

Yep, there’s the issue. There’s a big difference between that plastic miter box and the ones here

If you need to buy a new one, look at the 20-800 Stanley clamping miter box with the frame saw It would at least give you a fighting chance for around $50.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Richard

1907 posts in 2157 days


#14 posted 03-21-2014 04:14 PM

Don’t know how close this is but it might help.

Woodcraft of Downingtown
417 Boot Road
Downingtown, PA 19335
Call Us: 610-873-5660

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#15 posted 03-21-2014 07:41 PM

Lee Valley is having a free shipping event right now.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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