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Forum topic by WildmanJack posted 130 days ago 728 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WildmanJack

33 posts in 184 days


130 days ago

Hey folks, I have an old, Craftsman 10” table saw. It has a the original motor and I’m wondering if upgrading to a 2HP would improve it’s capabilities. I noticed that when cutting anything thicker than 1 1/2 it starts to bog down during the cut. Any suggestions would be of great heap. Thanks…

-- Just an old banjo player tryin my hand at woodworking.


19 replies so far

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 258 days


#1 posted 130 days ago

before changing out the motor, maybe try changing the blade as people never seem to give enough credit, to keeping the part that cuts, sharp ? in the event that fails, perhaps raisng the HP might help, but I would check out first, if the saw comes with an upgraded HP, as saws are engineered to the minimum standards of their maximum performance and so… exceeding the manufacturers specs, might not be wise

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WildmanJack

33 posts in 184 days


#2 posted 130 days ago

Kryptic, The blade is a new Diablo from Home Depot. so I know it’s sharp, well as sharp as a blade from the big box stores can be. The saw is from around 1953 or so, pretty old Craftsman all cast Iron but I guess I can do a search and see if I can put a bigger blade on it. Thanks for the quick reply..

-- Just an old banjo player tryin my hand at woodworking.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

3257 posts in 455 days


#3 posted 130 days ago

What is the original motor? You may not need 2 hp to see a great improvement. My 1 1/2 hp has really only bogged down when cutting full depth into oak and even then if I went slow it worked fine.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View sgmdwk's profile

sgmdwk

258 posts in 471 days


#4 posted 130 days ago

The performance of my old Craftsman saw (bought new in 1989) improved a great deal when I (1) cleaned my blades and (2) installed a linked belt. I still don’t try to cut through 2” of hardwood in one pass. I make several graduated cuts and get the job done, just fine.

-- Dave K.

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 258 days


#5 posted 130 days ago

there ya go

many voices that concur

clean and or sharpen your blade

and sneak up on the last cut ?

View Loren's profile

Loren

7232 posts in 2246 days


#6 posted 130 days ago

2 horses is good. 3 or more is better. I had a 12” INCA
cabinet saw with a 2.5hp motor and it was a good saw.

You’ll get easier cutting with a thin kerf blade: 3/32” vs
1/8” for full kerf.

Also, if you cut softwoods and you have pitch stuck on
the blade that can decrease performance. I soak
pitchy blades in detergent water and that softens
the gunk enough to get it off with a nylon bristle brush.
Works on band saw blades too. Carbide tips don’t
rust but band saw blades will so it’s important to dry
them or if it’s sunny I just lay them out and they
dry quick enough.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2439 posts in 949 days


#7 posted 130 days ago

A thin kerf blade will give 25% more HP, well not really, but in theory cutting will take 25% less effort.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View sawdustjunkie's profile

sawdustjunkie

119 posts in 315 days


#8 posted 130 days ago

My Craftsman 113 has a 1.5 hp motor. I only use thin kerf and have cut up to 6/4 hard maple and thicker in soft woods without any problems.
I am however looking into a new saw sometime this summer.

-- Steve: Franklin, WI

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 258 days


#9 posted 130 days ago

the biggest contributing factor to letting the wind out of the sails of a carbide tooth, to the dismay of most, is not abrasion from carbide, to wood, rather the exposure of moisture, thus corrosion of the carbide ….Loren ?

the thin kerf blades work best cutting thin stock

View WildmanJack's profile

WildmanJack

33 posts in 184 days


#10 posted 130 days ago

OK, I think what I’ll do is invest in a link belt, and like the suggestion, “sneak” up on thick cuts. Thanks guys great input My Craftsman is a 113 as well. Probably ought to invest in a decent thin kerf blade from somewhere other than Home D.
Thanks again,,,
Jack

-- Just an old banjo player tryin my hand at woodworking.

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

541 posts in 672 days


#11 posted 130 days ago

Diablo blades are as good as most any other. Link belt may or may not help? Thin kerf Diablo should be just fine. Also, Diablo also makes a good ripper in a 24 tooth blade, maybe a 30 too. I’d suggest a 24 or 30 thin blade for ripping.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View WildmanJack's profile

WildmanJack

33 posts in 184 days


#12 posted 130 days ago

Thanks Bill, Sure appreciate the info..

-- Just an old banjo player tryin my hand at woodworking.

View Woodsurgin's profile

Woodsurgin

30 posts in 1209 days


#13 posted 128 days ago

I use a linked belt and pulleys which up the speed.
My Forrest thin kerf blade really is great.
Make sure the fence is set right.
I installed a Delta T2 fence on my old Craftstman and it made a big difference in accuracy.

My old saw is a 3/4 hp motor and it does pretty well.

View WildmanJack's profile

WildmanJack

33 posts in 184 days


#14 posted 128 days ago

The fence on my old Craftsman is about as useless as anything. I do need to buy a new one.. Taking measurements at the blade front and back for EVERY cut is a total pain..
Jack

-- Just an old banjo player tryin my hand at woodworking.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1717 posts in 1227 days


#15 posted 128 days ago

I noticed that when cutting anything thicker than 1 1/2 it starts to bog down during the cut.

i have a similar 113 series c-man and it rips 8/4 hardwoods with no burning. i need to use a ripping blade (24-30T with and aggressive hook angle), keep the carbide teeth just above the top of the work piece so the gullets can clear the saw dust and i moderate my feed rate. 2 hp wouldn’t really make much of a difference.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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