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Can Someone Please Help Me to Stop Burning Wood with my Table Saw?

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Forum topic by Jerry posted 129 days ago 1479 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

502 posts in 244 days


129 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question maple tablesaw milling

I’m using a Shopsmith, and a Makita 10” hollow ground planer blade. The machine is set on the lowest saw speed setting. I canNOT seem to cut Maple without burning the heck out of it. I’ve tried a couple of different blades with no luck. Could someone please explain to me the error of my ways and possibly offer a solution? Thanks everybody.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.


43 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5242 posts in 1194 days


#1 posted 129 days ago

Outside of feed rate, blade sharpness, and height…make sure the fence is in proper alignment and the blade is clean.

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

774 posts in 689 days


#2 posted 129 days ago

I’m not familiar with your particular machine but if your table saw is burning your wood (something I’ve done many times) I can think of a couple of things that might help:

If you’re ripping, use a thin kerf rip blade. I use Freud’s. When new and sharp it’s pretty potent.

If you’re feeding it in too fast that could be a problem as well. But I’ve noticed when I stop feeding the wood it can burn as well. A slow but steady feed rate is good.

You may also want to wax the table and the fence to let the wood move a little more easily.

View mrjinx007's profile (online now)

mrjinx007

1309 posts in 364 days


#3 posted 129 days ago

Certain woods like cherry and maple have a lot of sugary sap in them. If they were cut in the spring or early fall, the sap has not had the time to go to the root in fall and obviously was flowing during Spring time. My only suggestion is to cut it 4 turns of your saw blade height adjustment at a time and keep the lumber flush against the fence. Hope that works for you. Also, be sure to clean your saw tooth after cutting woods like maple, cherry and hickory.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1938 posts in 873 days


#4 posted 129 days ago

Certain woods are just prone to burning…maple is one of them

I tend to rip maple a strong 1/16” over sized and make a second pass at final width to clean up the edge. I find doing it this way there is less heat and friction and thus less likely to burn

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1460 posts in 868 days


#5 posted 129 days ago

+ 1 for kdc68.
If your blade is clean and sharp and you’ve tweaked all of the alignments, then a final trim to your finished size will generate less heat.

Best Regards. – Grandpa Len
Work Safely and have Fun.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Tkf's profile

Tkf

37 posts in 523 days


#6 posted 129 days ago

Is your blade and fence parallel to the miter slots?

View stefang's profile

stefang

12537 posts in 1930 days


#7 posted 129 days ago

I have been cutting a lot of maple lately. The cuts on my miter saw have burned quite a bit, but not the cuts on my table saw. The table saw has a fresh blade and also a narrow kerf.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

257 posts in 549 days


#8 posted 129 days ago

Use of a featherboard, riving knife/splitter and a gripper have greatly minimized rip burning on my table saw.

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

54 posts in 144 days


#9 posted 128 days ago

When I was running an old Cman table saw, I had trouble with burning, mostly because it was so hard to get the fence parallel with the blade. I would measure from the miter groove on both ends to try to make parallel, and sometimes it would move while I was sawing, just a mess. Finally got a unisaw with a Biesemeyer fence, all those problems went away.

-- Jim from Kansas

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

502 posts in 244 days


#10 posted 128 days ago

Thanks everybody for the information, to answer all the questions I’ve seen, I am using a rip fence and a featherboard, I’ve taken extreme measures to make sure the rip fence is parallel with the saw blade. I have a super tall fence because the maple I’m cutting is actually a maple box from which I am parting the lid, but the maple was burning when I first dimensioned the pieces for the box as well. It burned when I was cross cutting using the miter gauge and it burns when I use the fence. It burns when I use an 8” fine tooth plywood blade, and it burns when I use a 10” hollow ground planer blade with a 1/16” kerf, very similar in design to this Dewalt blade in this picture here:

I have not cleaned the blade, but I can certainly try that. As far as cutting to within 1/16 of the final dimension and then trimming after that, I’m afraid that would mess up the parting line for the box lid, so that option may not be available to me in those scenarios.

I’m wondering if perhaps a different type of saw blade, and / or a slower speed on the table saw would work better. As I mentioned, I’m using a Shopsmith, and it is a variable speed motor. I’m using it on the SAW setting, but it may be that speed is too fast for maple. Does anyone have any thoughts about the proper speed for cutting maple?

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

502 posts in 244 days


#11 posted 128 days ago

RE: Purrmaster “For ripping, that blade seems to have a lot of teeth”

You know, you have a point…It may just be that part of the problem is too much of the saw plate is coming in contact with the wood.

I’ve also been doing some other reading on this subject, and one of my problems may be feed rate, ( or lack of it ) I read somewhere that if you slow down too much or if you stop, it will definitely burn the wood, and I’m quite sure I slowed down a lot and stopped several times to make sure I was flat against the fence.

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1637 posts in 1518 days


#12 posted 128 days ago

For ripping I use a 24 teeth sawblade, thin kerf. Get a very very smooth cut.

-- In God We Trust

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

774 posts in 689 days


#13 posted 128 days ago

This is the rip blade I’ve found cuts easiest when ripping:

http://www.freudtools.com/index.php/products/product/LU87R010

I’m sure there are other good rip blades out there but this is the one I have experience with.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

502 posts in 244 days


#14 posted 128 days ago

Thanks Jim and Purrmaster, I took a look at that blade, it looks like the hot ticket. I’m going to run, not walk :- ) , right out the front door tomorrow and buy one

-- I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my telephone.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3260 posts in 1409 days


#15 posted 128 days ago

You don’t have to spend a lot of money to get a good rip blade. Go to Home Depot and get a Diablo (Freud) 1024 thin kerf rip blade. You will notice a night and day difference. My full kerf combo blade burns cherry like crazy, but the thin kerf cuts great.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

showing 1 through 15 of 43 replies

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