LumberJocks

Power Cord for Jet Cabinet Saw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Baremeg55 posted 03-15-2014 03:47 PM 432 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Baremeg55's profile

Baremeg55

35 posts in 223 days


03-15-2014 03:47 PM

I have a 3HP Jet Cabinet Saw wired for 220V. The power cord that came with the saw when purchased (new) is slightly less than 6 feet in length. Although my saw is on a mobile base, I can not position the saw in the best location to make cuts because of the cord length and position of my 220v receptacle. My question is if I connect a new power cord to the saw, how long can I make it? Ten to twelve feet will be plenty sufficient for placing the saw in its ideal location for use. Any issues or concerns to note if making the power cord longer? Thanks, GH


15 replies so far

View davidls's profile

davidls

7 posts in 227 days


#1 posted 03-15-2014 05:03 PM

A 240V 3HP motor will draw about 11-13 amps so, for the length you want 14 gauge works well. My saw is also 3HP and I run 12’ of 14/3 cord with a NEMA 6-15 plug.

View Baremeg55's profile

Baremeg55

35 posts in 223 days


#2 posted 03-15-2014 05:06 PM

David – thanks for the feedback!!! I now have an additional weekend project… :)

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2859 posts in 1930 days


#3 posted 03-15-2014 05:51 PM

I feel 14 gauge is marginal and adequate for lighting circuits. For power tools, a minimum of 12 gauge would be recommended.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

498 posts in 1273 days


#4 posted 03-15-2014 05:59 PM

I would make an extension cord using 12ga. Then you could use it for other machines should the need arise.

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

225 posts in 355 days


#5 posted 03-15-2014 06:42 PM

+1 on the extension cord, I have one I made with 12 gauge wire and use for all my machines.

-- Earl

View Baremeg55's profile

Baremeg55

35 posts in 223 days


#6 posted 03-15-2014 07:20 PM

Retfr8flyr and Woodmaster1 – Do I understand correctly that you both recommend an extension cord and not re-wiring the power cord to the cabinet saw? If so, that would make it a lot easy to make a 6 or 8 foot extension cord, as I would need to remove and replace the original cord thru the saw cabinet and switch. Do you simply use the same type connectors (I.e. Nema-6) ? This would definitely come in more handy with the Rikon bandsaw 240v 3HP motor) due in next week!

Thanks to all that have contributed thus far!

GH

View davidls's profile

davidls

7 posts in 227 days


#7 posted 03-15-2014 07:23 PM

While it won’t hurt to go 12 gauge, the guideline for 14 gauge is 15 amps for less than 18 feet. Though the motor might have something like a 12 amp rating, it won’t draw that much unless you’re pushing it hard. So, 10-12’ of 14g will work just fine. I replaced the original 6’ cord on my 3HP saw with 12’ of 14/3 cord. I purchased a 12’ power cord with a molded NEMA 6-15 plug and pig tails on the other end. It made the rewriting job simple as I didn’t have to wire a plug or contend with oversize 12g wire.

View davidls's profile

davidls

7 posts in 227 days


#8 posted 03-15-2014 07:29 PM

I don’t like extension cords as a permanent solution for this application. While I used one on my saw like this for awhile without any problems it adds another connection that lies on the floor and is susceptible to getting partially pulled apart or having liquid spilled on it.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

555 posts in 885 days


#9 posted 03-15-2014 07:35 PM

If you are going the extension cord route, you might want to beef it up a bit so you can use other devices in the future.. I have a 50A outlet in my garage that I use for my welder.. I made a 15 foot extension cord for it, and used 8ga wire so it could carry the full 50A if needed (even though my welder never hits more than 20A). Going bigger will also help ensure that it’s the breaker that trips instead of the wire melting :-O

Here is a handy chart:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 635 days


#10 posted 03-15-2014 07:58 PM

personally I usually buy a #12 25’ extension cord and cut the ends off and put on the right end. I found buying a premade cord and cutting the ends off is cheaper than wire alone. That may have changed, but do some comparison.
also replacing the cord on the saw will save you the cost of 2 plugs.

View davidls's profile

davidls

7 posts in 227 days


#11 posted 03-15-2014 08:00 PM

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

225 posts in 355 days


#12 posted 03-15-2014 08:35 PM

Gary, Yes I only have a 220v outlet on the other side of my garage, so I made a 30ft extension cord with #10 cable and use it for all my machines. I just plug in whichever machine I am using at the time. I will probably have some 220v outlets installed on the woodworking side of my garage eventually but this works fine and as my garage is finished inside, running wires for outlets will be expensive.

-- Earl

View Baremeg55's profile

Baremeg55

35 posts in 223 days


#13 posted 03-15-2014 10:28 PM

Guys,

Thanks for all of the replies, advice and info!

Earl, are you working in my garage??? My garage was the contractors supervisor office for one of the builders in our subdivision years ago, thus, it was completely finished on the inside. It originally had central heat and AC, but the first homeowners asked them to remove the unit when they bought the lot years ago. It is a good and bad arrangement. The garage measures 32×34 feet, is a three car garage, but my workspace is reduced as I have two completed 10×12 feet rooms on the back, along with a full bath and a closet. So, my main work area would measure 31×22. One of the rooms I use as a storeroom, the other I made into my office, the closet I can lock away the valuable stuff, and the bathroom, well, no explanation needed. :)

The great thing about the garage being finished and insulated, I can keep the temperature in the mid 70’s in the hot Houston summers, and easily at 70 in what we would call winter here (no comments required)... We bought the house because of the garage, it was more or less a perfect habitat for my woodworking. LOL.

Thanks again for everyone’s input. For the time being, I’m going with a 10’ bonded extension cord complete with the correct plug/receptacle. This will allow me to more or less leave my cabinet saw and band saw stationary and get power to them. I will look into a more permanent power cord in the future, along with running a few more 240 lines later (perfect time for that will be when I replace the siding on the garage with Hardie plank)!!!

Regards,

GH

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

543 posts in 760 days


#14 posted 03-15-2014 10:52 PM

Think I remember seeing a 100 ft. either 10 or 12 ga. extension cord at Harbor Freight for $99.00. Cheaper than buying by the ft. at the box store.

I have a 30 ft. 6 ga. extension I made up to use for my 3 hp Unisaw. Handy if I wanna move the saw. Also use it for my welder and compressor.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7724 posts in 2334 days


#15 posted 03-15-2014 11:24 PM

I usually use SOOW cable. Home centers carry it and sell
it by the foot. I’ve bought twist-lock plugs at those
stores but I’ve found I can save a lot of money by
buying them on ebay, so if I can wait a few days that’s
what I do.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase