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Cleaning Supplies For Band Saw Parts

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Forum topic by Charlie75 posted 03-14-2014 11:51 PM 1117 views 1 time favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


03-14-2014 11:51 PM

Today I removed the table and the trunnion from the saw. The trunnion parts seem to be among the few that don’t get painted. They look like they are made of pot metal. These parts have a certain amount of packed in saw dust and oil or grease. Most likely from a lack of house keepiing by the previous owner.

I want to clean those up and I have three substances left over from my days restoring old John Deere lawn and garden tractors. I am wondering if any of you guys out there are familiar with any of these and if any can be used to clean up the trunion. I really don’t want to take the trunion all apart because of all the parts in there.

Anyway, The three are: Engine Foamy Bright by Gunk. It’s in an aresol can that you shake up and spay on and let it foam. When the foaming stops you rinse it off in running water. I have used it on a lot of small parts and it seems to work quite well. Of these three it’s the easiest to use.

The second is also a Gunk product called Super Concentrate Degreaser. Says it for Engine part, Machinery and metal parts. The down side of this on is it’s mixed with Kerosene, light fuel oil or mineral spirits. You soak the part, brush as necessary to remove dirt and rinse in a stream of water.

The third is Oil Eater Cleaner and Degreaser. Says it cleans and dissolves Grease. Also used to presoak laundry, pre rinse dirty work clothes and carpet. You spray it on, brush and rinse in cold water.

Do you think that there might be anything that would hurt these parts.? Your opinions greatly appreciated.
The rest of the saw I plan on removing the wheels and masking off anything else that should not be painted.

My appologizes for this being so long.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto


18 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#1 posted 03-15-2014 12:29 AM

I would use water and something like Simple Green. Soaking
is good, followed by scrubbing with a soft bristle brush. If you
dry the part after cleaning it won’t flash rust. I do this
with gummed-up saw blades too. Spray oven cleaner is quicker,
costs more and is toxic stuff too.

Kerosene is a god degreaser too. I recently acquired a belt
sander which had been used on metal. The whole thing
was coated in grease and metal particles stuck to it. I sprayed
a lot of mineral spirits on it at first, then went after every
nook and cranny with a glue brush dipped in mineral
spirits. It was a lot of work but eventually I got the machine
clean enough for woodworking.

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


#2 posted 03-15-2014 02:12 AM

Thanks Loren. I forgot about Simple Green. I have a half gallon of the too. Much simpler then the rest of these things.
What would you use to keep the parts from rusting in the future. I have an idea that most anything I would put on there would only attract more dust and saw dust.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#3 posted 03-15-2014 02:20 AM

What kind of band saw? A stock Delta/Delta clone 14” is dirt simple to take apart. Lower guide is held on by just two screws.. cast trunnion support has 3. Seems to me that trying to use chemicals/cleaning products while things are still bolted on would just make more of a mess.

Here is a simple trick for de-gunking various unpainted parts: Go down to the dollar store and pick up a cheap dutch oven or similar large pot. Trust me, you don’t want to use the wifes pots! Fill it up about 3/4 of the way with water and add a little purple power/simple green/insert your favorite degreaser/cleaner here. Put it on the stove and get it to a simmer.. almost boiling but not quite. Put your parts in it and let them simmer for an hour or so, occassionally proking and prodding with a stick or other suitable pointy object. Really nasty parts may take a bit longer, but they will come out squeaky clean.

As an alternative, I have found that old crock pots work pretty good as well, and you can keep it out in the garage so nobody attempts to ‘taste the soup’ simmering on the stove :)

Cheers,
Brad

Edit: You don’t have to worry much about the pot metal stuff rusting.. but those trunnions should be painted anyway. Other shiney metal stuff can be protected with a thin film of paraffin wax. Mix some in mineral spirits, wipe on and let the solvent evaporate. Leaves a nice thin coat of wax and doesn’t attract sawdust.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


#4 posted 03-15-2014 10:16 AM

Thanks Brad. Very interesting. I’ll be going to a local dollar store today to find a Dutch Oven. The band saw in question is an old Delta Milwaukee vintage 1955 that I am in the process of restoring. Here are a couple of photos.

I am hoping I can clean these up without tearing them all apart. I might add here that the cool blocks and the thrust bearings will be replaced.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2144 days


#5 posted 03-15-2014 05:40 PM

I use a lot of carb cleaner. It dries quickly and comes with that handy little straw to direct it where needed.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#6 posted 03-15-2014 06:43 PM

If you are doing a restore, then you really should take it apart.. and it looks like you already are half way there anyway. The upper guide is dirt simple to dismantle, and you can then take the rusted bits and soak them in Evaporust to bring them back to life. Not really a lot of parts involved with it:

Lower guide is a bit more complicated, but still not too difficult. Once you take the adjusting knobs/rods off, the whole mess is only held on with two screws (via the large flat bar shown below):

Cheers,
Brad

PS: It looks like you removed the table by taking out the 6 bolts holding the trunnions to the table! Much easier to just remove the two angle adjusting knobs completely and simply lift the table off, trunnions and all. That is also the easy way to remove the table when transporting the machine.. the trunnions are a weak point, and not removing the table before transporting or other rough handling is the main cause of them breaking.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


#7 posted 03-15-2014 09:14 PM

Brad, Thanks a bunch. You have given me the confidence to forge ahead. I don’t know how complete a restoration I will do but these, what I consider, more important parts I probably will. Taking things apart is my area of expertese. Putting them back together is another matter. lol

Carb cleaner sounds a lit easier than boiling. I told my wife I had to borrow her large pressure cooker. When I told her what for, well you can figure the rest out. lol

I happen to have a little carb cleaner left from my tractor restoration days. And thanks of the name of the rust remover. (Evaporust) It had been recommended to me by someone in a previous post but i could not find it.
Where can Evaporust be found? Would NAPA have it? I have never used it.

And thanks for the tips on removing the table. I thought there must be an easier way. Oh, I assume that Evaporust will work for the table top too.

When I saw you tag line “To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid” My first thought was when do the wise part kick in? lol

Charlie

:EDIT: After looking at my pictures it kind of looks like the casting which all of these parts are attached to is painted. So if I take apart all of the other parts as you suggest it will be much easier to paint. So I guess I have to take it apart.

-- Charlie75, Alto

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#8 posted 03-15-2014 09:24 PM

In this area O’Reilly Auto Parts stocks Evaporust.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


#9 posted 03-16-2014 12:10 AM

Thanks Herb. I would suspect that most any auto supply house might carry it. I wouldn’t be too surprised if Wallmart miight carry it.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

View Chris208's profile

Chris208

237 posts in 1730 days


#10 posted 03-16-2014 04:50 AM

Here’s my post about the saw I rebuilt. Hopefully it helps you out.

These are great, great little saws.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/47510

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1014 posts in 1389 days


#11 posted 03-16-2014 04:57 AM

I just ordered Evaporust from O’Reilly’s auto parts, they had it in the next morning. Website said Tractor Supply and Fastenal also carry it. Did a great job on my CraigsList bandsaw table, overnight soak, rinsed with water, wiped down with denatured alcohol to drive off any remaining water, then coated with Boeshield.

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3596 posts in 1938 days


#12 posted 03-16-2014 05:00 AM

trend bit and blade cleaner is the best stuff for any metal cleanup you can order it in 5 gallon cans I keep it on hand at all times I use it when restoring machines and hand planes too

-- Please check out my new stores http://woodratnest.com and http://woodshopstore.com

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


#13 posted 03-16-2014 03:36 PM

WOW! Thanks Chris. Loved your story. Makes me want to go out hunting for another one of these saws and I don’t even have the one I do own in usable condition. lol

And thanks to all of the others who took the time to offer suggestions. That’s what makes this forum great.

On a related subject, after getting rid of all or most of the rust and gunk then what? How do most of you prevent it’s return? There must be as many ideas on that as there are on how to get rid of it in the first place.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7167 posts in 2037 days


#14 posted 03-16-2014 04:38 PM

Maas metal polish is effective.

View Charlie75's profile

Charlie75

286 posts in 1725 days


#15 posted 03-16-2014 07:02 PM

OK guys, on the advice and council of MrUnix I am going ahead with a more complete rehab of my band saw. I was bored this afternoon so I grabbed a screw driver and an allen wrench and my camera and set out on my quest to pretty this thing up a little. It was cruddier than I originally thought. The one good thing is that none of the screws or allen screws were seized to the point I could not get them out.

First I did this:

Then I moved on to the actual trunion which was a bit more of a challenge. By the time I was done I ended up with this:

The first real problem came up when I got to this part:

I can’t get that old bearing off of the shaft. Any suggestions? I am afraid to put too much pressure on that casting for fear of breaking something.

Also note that somehow there are saw marks on this shaft. How that could have happened is a mystery to me. The previous owner did let his kids “play” with the saw for some of their projects.

One more thing. On the Evaporust stuff, I found out that Harbor Freight carries it. And my local HF has it. Have to get my hair cut tomorrow and go right past the HF store to get to the barber.

Charlie

-- Charlie75, Alto

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