LumberJocks

Cutting Small Strips On A Table or Bandsaw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by thetinman posted 03-13-2014 06:55 PM 883 views 2 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View thetinman's profile

thetinman

248 posts in 260 days


03-13-2014 06:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tips jigs thin strips table saw band saw

A young lady from down the street just came by rather in a panic. To summarize; she said her husband was building a toy box on his new saw and the little “thing” blew up in his face. She said he was hurt and asked me come with her. Of course I went with her. He was OK, bits of plastic peppered his face. Looked like Zit City but no real damage. He was lucky.

Turns out he had a new Kobalt table saw and was building a toy shelf unit (kind of like a bookcase) for his daughter. Doing a good job till now. He was in the process of cutting thin strips of pine to cover the end grain of the plywood. He was using only the plastic push-stick that came with the saw to cut ½” pieces between the fence and saw blade. Well, he had hacked up the bottom of the plastic stick to the point that he hit the blade at just the right angle and it simply blew all the little pieces out. He was smart enough to wear glasses.

I cleaned him up and the wife calmed down and stopped being a mother and scolding him for buying that D* thing. (You’ll put your eye out kid) I brought him down to my house and we cut the strips. Best to do it at my house – I had beer and she stayed home. (Of course I know that her fear was understandable)

This it what I use to cut thin strips. I can’t lay claim to it. It was my dad’s. It is simple to build and safe to use. The tool never moves, your hands are always away from the blade and every piece comes out without burn marks with little need for sanding. On this one, my dad cut a slot for the bolt to slide into and used a brass (I think) knob. A carriage bolt, washer and wing-nut would work just fine.

To use it you slide in line with the blade, adjust to the width you want cut, lock it down and slide it to the front of the saw. Move your board with the fence until it touches the tool, lock the fence and cut. Now just move the board with the fence and repeat. This one cuts strips from nothing to about 2-1/4”.

Yes,I know I should have a better blade insert. New saw only a coulple days old. I’m working on it. But, thanks for noticing.

-- Life is what happens to you while you are planning better things -Mark Twain


14 replies so far

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

196 posts in 253 days


#1 posted 03-21-2014 01:31 PM

As long as you use a sacrificial push stick you can safely rip thin strips tight to the fence. Then you do not have to reset the rip fence after each cut.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1298 days


#2 posted 03-21-2014 01:51 PM

^ I usually do it that way.
Less chance of things going wrong with the thin strip jig though.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

543 posts in 796 days


#3 posted 03-21-2014 02:02 PM

Good that you were there to help tinman.

I’m with you, don’t like ripping thin strips between the fence and blade all that much. Your gauge/tool looks like a good solution.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

View thetinman's profile

thetinman

248 posts in 260 days


#4 posted 03-21-2014 03:15 PM

Thanks for your comments. As I said I did not invent it. Variations have been around for years. Besides less danger, this jig avoids the burn marks and excess saw marks you get when thin strips are pinched betwen the fence and saw. The cuts come out just as good as any other rip operation If you have a good blade the thin strips are ready for glue such as to cover plywood end grain.

-- Life is what happens to you while you are planning better things -Mark Twain

View oldretiredjim's profile

oldretiredjim

182 posts in 1107 days


#5 posted 03-21-2014 03:34 PM

1/2” is about as thin as I go on a TS. BS is safer but the cut isn’t as clean. I use a GRR-Ripper but prefer not to cut thin strips against the fence either.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

258 posts in 1789 days


#6 posted 03-21-2014 07:03 PM

I use two gripp’rs and you can go as thin as a slight thicker than the thinnest hold down on the gripper. 3/16 would not be an issue.

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 792 days


#7 posted 03-21-2014 07:18 PM

Tinman way to help out/save the day! Personally I use a gripper but a thin rip jig like your has been on my list for a while. With YOUR endorsement, I will have to put it on the front burner. Thank god your neighbor was wearing safety glasses! God job on being neighborly too. What goes around comes around.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View thetinman's profile

thetinman

248 posts in 260 days


#8 posted 03-21-2014 07:23 PM

Hey Joe,

I’m glad I was there too. He’s a nice kid with a nice family. The jig works good and takes about 20 minutes to make. This one was my dad’s but I’ve made several for friends. Add a block of wood in the front then trim and cut at 45 when the glue dries. No tollerance to worry about.

-- Life is what happens to you while you are planning better things -Mark Twain

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 792 days


#9 posted 03-21-2014 07:28 PM

as you were writing this, I was building one out in my head. Im wondering, do you think it would be worth the time to put a bearing in the tip? My thoughts are the smoother the wood runs through, the better. Im a big fan of low friction tape but I dont think this would be the right application for it.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View thetinman's profile

thetinman

248 posts in 260 days


#10 posted 03-21-2014 07:33 PM

I’ve seen store bought ones with bearings. Some folks are now adding bearings to the home built. From my experience I don’t see the need. It’s not like you should jam the board to the jig. But I also must say that I’ve been using this since I was knee high and am used to it. In short a bearing couldn’t hurt. If it makes you more comfortable do it.

-- Life is what happens to you while you are planning better things -Mark Twain

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 792 days


#11 posted 03-21-2014 07:35 PM

It might make my girlfriend more comfortable about me using it LOL! I also dont see the need, because from what I understand the stock just touches the guide. My problem is that when I build a jig I tend to try to cram every possible upgrade or cool function I can. I will have to make the ultimate thin rip jig. If budget were no concern, Id throw a digital caliper/readout on that bad boy just for fun.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

296 posts in 1074 days


#12 posted 03-21-2014 07:43 PM

Charles,
Maybe a wide wheel such as is on a skate board. That would cover the whole vertical distance from horizontal top to bottom which would make it useful for different thicknesses of wood you might be cutting.

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 792 days


#13 posted 03-21-2014 07:46 PM

Timberwolf, if the Charles was meant for me, then Im afraid you are mistaken my friend! That is just a quote from our own Charles Neil. Im TBW/BW or if were friends, Joe. I like your idea about the wheel, would be good for slabs or thick cutting boards. Nice idea and thanks for posting it.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View thetinman's profile

thetinman

248 posts in 260 days


#14 posted 03-21-2014 07:52 PM

Good idea for wider coverage but skateboard wheels are not flat. Take that into consideration.

-- Life is what happens to you while you are planning better things -Mark Twain

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase