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Any suggestions on where to find support requirements for stools, chairs, etc.

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Forum topic by lightcs1776 posted 03-11-2014 07:59 PM 801 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


03-11-2014 07:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I am getting ready to cut some maple to make seats for bar stools, to use along the kitchen peninsula. I figure I’ll make the seats approximately 16” around, then attach four legs, using a simple tenon design. The legs will either be maple or perhaps something darker to contrast the maple seats. I figured it was simple enough, and have seen the same style in many stores, that finding out how thick to make the legs would be easy. Unfortunately a search on line didn’t bring up any good rules for making legs. I would like to find information not only for determining how thick the wood should be for bar stools, but for other items as well, such as tables, night stands, etc. Can anyone point me toward a good resource for this type of information?

Thanks in advance.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **


12 replies so far

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

13491 posts in 1821 days


#1 posted 03-12-2014 12:09 AM

Chris, I thought I had some plans here somewhere but not finding them. I’ll have to run out to the shop and measure the ones I made…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#2 posted 03-12-2014 12:28 AM

Thanks, Marty. I’m surprised how hard it’s been to find this info. I found plenty on how high, but nothing on how thick the legs need to be.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#3 posted 03-12-2014 04:26 PM

I would just look at some stools in a store and measure the legs.

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#4 posted 03-12-2014 04:39 PM

Thanks for the suggestion, Ron.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#5 posted 03-12-2014 05:38 PM

The compression failure of a one inch stick of wood in the longitudinal direction is going to be in the thousands of pounds. Just about anything you do is going to be more than adequate for a stool w several legs.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#6 posted 03-12-2014 05:41 PM

Thanks, Bondo. Wonder if a kid tipping in the stool should be a consideration. An inch thick is pretty easy to accomplish.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#7 posted 03-12-2014 06:19 PM

That is why most stools have splayed legs, for stability. Kids can make jungle gym of most any furniture.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#8 posted 03-12-2014 06:27 PM

Got it. This is my first step into any type of furniture, which is my goal for woodworking. Lots to learn. Thanks.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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jdh122

879 posts in 2278 days


#9 posted 03-12-2014 06:50 PM

If you are using round mortise and tenons on the joint, you may want to steal an idea from Windsor chairmakers. Round tenons may eventually work loose (because the mortise is almost all endgrain and the glue bond is not all that strong because of that). On Windsor chairs the solution is generally to do a tapered joint where the legs meet the top. The leg comes all the way through the top and then gets wedged with a wedge that is also keyed into the top.
A regular round joint may hold just fine, but it may not (unless you manage to get the tenons dryer than the mortise, but this is next to impossible with this style of construction although it works fine for post and rung chairs and stools).

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#10 posted 03-12-2014 06:58 PM

Jeremy, thanks for the idea. I have a follow up question. If I have the tenons go through the seat of the stool, can I then use thinner stock for the seat? I was going to double some 4/4 maple, so I could have a deep enough mortise, but it sounds like I could go with 4/4.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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jdh122

879 posts in 2278 days


#11 posted 03-12-2014 10:45 PM

I’d think you’d still want more than an inch thick. Although that would certainly be strong enough to hold a person’s weight I’d be inclined to have it at least 6/4 and probably 8/4, partly just for how it would look. But maybe someone else has an idea – and if you find good plans follow them.
I may have misunderstood your post – if you’re planning on making a stool with an apron running around the top (rather than round legs into the actual seat, like on a Windsor) there is no reason to wedge the tenons and you could certainly make the seat out of 4/4 maple.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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lightcs1776

4153 posts in 1115 days


#12 posted 03-13-2014 12:10 AM

Well then, I will definitely double the wood to make it 8/4. I purchased enough maple to do that, but I don’t want to waste any. Maple is a precious commodity in my house. I haven’t found any plans yet, but will keep looking. The general idea is to make a round seat with four legs, joined with cross spindles about 6 inches from the bottom (not sure if this makes sense). The legs would be made from round spindles, made on the lathe by my wife.

Something similar to this:

I really appreciate the help and the tips. Thank you.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

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