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How can I cut on a too-small table saw

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Forum topic by thewfool posted 03-11-2014 01:38 AM 724 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thewfool

2 posts in 205 days


03-11-2014 01:38 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw rip cut too small

I am very new to woodworking. I’ve been watching a lot of youtube and built some small projects, but I’m feeling a little wary of my table saw. It’s a 10-inch craftsman, which I know isn’t a great saw, but it fits my budget while I’m still deciding if I have any talent for this.

I’m trying to cut some plywood for a case I am making. I was able to rip it with my circular saw, but it needs additional cuts at the table saw. My problem is that I understand that I don’t want to pinch the work piece between the blade and the fence, so I don’t know how to safely make this cut. From what I’ve seen, this type of cut would normally use the miter gauge to push, but my table saw is so small that I can’t do that. There’s 6 inches between the front of the table and the blade! How can I safely cut sheets that are more than 6 inches? (This one is 14 inches).

I’ve attached a picture of what I’m talking about. I’m sorry if this is a common question, but my searches haven’t come up with any results.

Thanks for any advice!


17 replies so far

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1536 posts in 434 days


#1 posted 03-11-2014 01:42 AM

That is a beautiful saw. The way you have locate the piece on the picture should give you what you need. I don’t see a need for miter saw based on the picture.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 327 days


#2 posted 03-11-2014 01:42 AM

same way you cut on a big one

only smaller pieces

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1536 posts in 434 days


#3 posted 03-11-2014 01:45 AM

You are doing it right. Do not use the miter in conjunction with the fence.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Kryptic's profile

Kryptic

294 posts in 327 days


#4 posted 03-11-2014 01:45 AM

another dead fly : )

aside from ripping long boards

the pieces just get smaller, and the methods remain the same, be it cutting perfect 45 degree angles or a perfect butt joint, a tool is means to get you there and yer about to cut your finger off ?

kidding

View Mark Davisson's profile

Mark Davisson

499 posts in 1984 days


#5 posted 03-11-2014 01:49 AM

I believe that I would go back to the circular saw. Make yourself a fence or homemade track and clamp it to the work piece.

Someone else might have ideas on how to do it safely on your TS.

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

884 posts in 301 days


#6 posted 03-11-2014 01:59 AM

you can make a panel cutting sled.

It will allow you to cut safely by keeping the ply on the sled and not cocking.
you also need to create a piece that cutoff rests on after the cut to avoid it from hitting the blade during the drop and support it to prevent it from pinching the blade.

-- Jeff NJ

View NormG's profile

NormG

4208 posts in 1670 days


#7 posted 03-11-2014 02:02 AM

Love the panel sled idea

-- Norman

View thewfool's profile

thewfool

2 posts in 205 days


#8 posted 03-11-2014 02:11 AM

Wow, thanks for the great responses! I think I’m going to take a crack at the sled, I’ve been wanting to make one anyway. Now, I just need to figure out how to make rails that fit in the slots.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1928 posts in 1898 days


#9 posted 03-11-2014 02:17 AM

I think an outfeed table which is just a tad shorter that the table saw top would help greatly. Search this website and Google it if needed to see what others have done.

I work in a one car garage with limited work area. I built an outfeed table which doubles as a work bench and assembly table. I made the top out of a soid core door with Formica laminated on top. Very sturdy and heavy.

Good luck.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

4512 posts in 523 days


#10 posted 03-11-2014 02:18 AM

The problem I had with my little craftsman was that the fence would not clamp parallel to the blade. I always measured front and back from blade to the fence until I was happy then make cut. Make sure it’s parallel before you cut. You need to make sure and push the piece through evenly. Your right hand should use a push stick as it’s getting a little tight between fence and blade. Left hand should be in the middle of what is going to be the off fall. As your cut is finishing, push the small piece straight through and past. The larger piece on the left can just rotate away and to the left as the two separate. When your off fall is too small to have a hand on it, either switch the saw off and wait for it to stop before you move to the left or use a push stick to slide the little piece away from the blade. Those little pieces can be propelled right back at you. I see you’re using your guard which is particularly important for a novice. Hope that helps a little.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

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firefighterontheside

4512 posts in 523 days


#11 posted 03-11-2014 02:20 AM

The crosscut sleds can be difficult to build for those saws because of the unconventional slots with little nubs protruding. You may search that. I think someone overcame that somehow.

-- Bill M. I love my job as a firefighter, but nothing gives me the satisfaction of running my hand over a project that I have built and just finished sanding.

View Paul's profile

Paul

525 posts in 232 days


#12 posted 03-11-2014 02:20 AM

Panel sleds on small contractor saws don’t work well with large sheet goods, 6 inches of room from the table to the blade and large amounts of excess hang over will rock the sled.

I have a DW744 and the only kickback I’ve ever had was when I tried a panel sled on the small table top. half way through the cut the sled tipped out of the miter slightly due to the weight of the overhanging piece of ply I was cutting (3’6”’s) when I put pressure back onto the sled to correct it back onto the table it kicked.

I had a fence on my sled so nothing happened but a jammed left thumb from the sled that got thrown back at me but I don’t recommend large panel sleds with small contractor saws. Especially saws with very limited table work space.

Paul

View mikeevens45's profile

mikeevens45

68 posts in 243 days


#13 posted 03-11-2014 02:32 AM

you can adjust the trunions on that saw, I did with mine…you need a long 5/32 allen wrench socket kind of a pain to get to…I would say make a infeed table and outfeed setup…you don’t need the miter slots for fence cutting. I used my workbench for outfeed and craftsman workmate for the infeed…I have a very small shop….just take your time…

mike

-- as technology progresses, wood workers seem to regress...all my power tools and my favorite is a chisel and a hand plane

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mikeevens45

68 posts in 243 days


#14 posted 03-11-2014 02:33 AM

oh and a good push block for the reach

mike

-- as technology progresses, wood workers seem to regress...all my power tools and my favorite is a chisel and a hand plane

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

884 posts in 301 days


#15 posted 03-11-2014 02:47 AM

you can put the fence on the panel sled on the other side and it will register the panel quickly into the blade.
That works too, and I had a panel cutter like that earlier. I now just use my circular saw for breaking down big panels..

-- Jeff NJ

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