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Craftsman scroll saw model 103.0404 value?

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Forum topic by camps764 posted 03-06-2014 02:11 PM 785 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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camps764

794 posts in 1014 days


03-06-2014 02:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman scroll saw 1030404

Hey folks – I know there are a lot of vintage guys on here…I have a scroll saw that’s been taking up space in my shop forever….since I have a band saw and smaller bench top scroll saw, I don’t really need it anymore. In fact, I could really use the space for other stuff in my garage shop.

Problem is…I have no idea what to list the thing for…can’t really find anything similar on the local craigslist.

Its a C-man, model 103.0404, still in pretty good condition overall. Very dusty right now, so I found some stock images on the net to help you see what I’m talking about.

EDIT: This is a picture of the same saw…cleaned up version. Don’t want to confuse anyone thinking that the picture is of my saw.

Mine is in similar condition, but not as shiny. Everything works on it…just needs a good cleaning.

Was considering parting it out, using the table for a router plate, etc, but wanted to get an idea of the saws value before I starting taking it apart.

I see benchtop models go for about 45-60 on CL, this thing is obviously bigger, uses non-pinned blades, has a worklight and a deeper throat for more complex stuff…I would imagine.

Any guesses on the value?

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com


8 replies so far

View DeLayne Peck's profile

DeLayne Peck

345 posts in 856 days


#1 posted 03-06-2014 05:34 PM

Wow, Camps, that thing is amazing! It’s vintage, circa 1940, or earlier. So, it’s 75 years old or more. So that is late Depression era/pre-WWII. It is very high-end for the time. Your price question is complicated by the fact that it is a, probably rare, antique.

It’s note worthy that it has it’s own motor. Motors were big, bulky, and expensive. It was common to run an assortment of bench tools on a single motor. They were connected to a long shaft that ran down the back of the bench with spindles spaced along it. My grandfather’s shop ran that way.

Found this link on the net.

My suggestion: Clean and polish the hell out of it. Do a lot more research. Take some great pictures and work backward from $500.

That’s my guess. Would like to see some hard core scrollers weigh in on this question.

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. I think of my shop as Fritter City. I am the Mayor.

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camps764

794 posts in 1014 days


#2 posted 03-06-2014 05:50 PM

Thanks DJ! From looking at the net I saw it was 1940ish. Got it as part of a lot of tools I bought for $60. Included an old CMan Lathe, the scroll saw, and a few other odds and ends type stuff. Figured I’d hang on to the lathe, but the Scroll saw is just taking up space in my shop.

With the stand it has a pretty big footprint. If I had a big shop I’d keep it, figuring I’d use it someday. But as someone that doesn’t scroll and needs every inch of space possible, it needs to go eventually.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

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camps764

794 posts in 1014 days


#3 posted 03-15-2014 12:31 PM

Just want to bump this to revise it. Planning to list it later today on Craigslist…still curious to hear if anyone has any other opinions on what it might be worth. I am planning to start it out at $400 and go from there.

Mine isn’t quite as shiny as the one pictured above, but in darn near the same condition. Just covered in saw dust :)

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1784 posts in 1147 days


#4 posted 03-15-2014 04:32 PM

I do, I had one of those saws for a short while. It wasn’t as nice as that pic, but it was complete. I paid $60. I’ve bought a few others, some that large, some smaller, all under $100 (again, none in the same condition as that photo). Not trying to deflate your euphoria, but my guess is somewhere north of $100, but not far north. Of course, the real answer is “whatever you can get” You can try a high price, but I know I won’t even call if I think the price on an old tool is way out of line. BTW, I’m sure I have a pdf of the owner’s manual for it, it’s a King Seeley saw labeled with the Craftsman name. Regardless of how you price it, I wish you the best of luck.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

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camps764

794 posts in 1014 days


#5 posted 03-15-2014 05:25 PM

Thanks Fred!

That is very helpful!

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

473 posts in 1241 days


#6 posted 03-15-2014 05:55 PM

I have an older model and paid 50.00 years ago. I would sell mine for 50.00 today.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7554 posts in 2302 days


#7 posted 03-15-2014 06:39 PM

$50.

Some marquetry people prefer that style of saw for some
cuts because the blade moves straight up and down. Deeper
throated models were made by Powermatic and Oliver
and are sought after by some professionals.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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camps764

794 posts in 1014 days


#8 posted 04-22-2014 02:03 PM

Thanks again everyone for the great feedback on the price. I ended up letting it go this morning for $35 to a retired guy that refurbishes old woodworking machines. I was tired of it taking up space, and was happy to see it go to a good home where someone will appreciate it.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

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