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What is your Inlay stone Preference?

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Forum topic by Kurty posted 03-04-2014 04:08 AM 1128 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kurty

10 posts in 1013 days


03-04-2014 04:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: turning embellishments metal shaving inlay stone inlay metal wire question

What Inlay stonedust, material or product performs the best for you ?
regarding beauty, charater and workturnability.

txs,
Kurty


16 replies so far

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1140 posts in 1141 days


#1 posted 03-04-2014 05:01 AM

Pearl or shell & bone. Easy to do fret markers, Abalam in 5in x 7in sheets

http://www.luthiersupply.com/

http://www.dukeofpearl.com/

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Inlay,_pearl.html

http://www.knifehandles.com/smooth-jigged-bone/undyed-bone

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View sparks's profile

sparks

62 posts in 2556 days


#2 posted 03-04-2014 05:57 AM

Hey Kurty, we have a rock and gem store here were I live and I have found that buying chunks of turquoise, jade, crushed garnet, really any type of gem or stone and cruching it myself works and is cheaper. The guy here ive made a good relationship with and he grinds stuff for me whenever I want. He also has fossils and the fossilized snail shells ( cant think of proper name) cut in have and ive also inlayed those. Find a rock and gem store and talk to them they have amazing stuff. I also get abalone shell pieces from him. You’d be amazed at all the stuffthey have. If you dont have one in your area let me know what you want and I can send it to you. Im glad the last tip help for you. Its amazing how the finish just brings it back to life.

-- Sparks

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8262 posts in 2895 days


#3 posted 03-04-2014 12:45 PM

All of my work with stone inlay is on flat surfaces so, my thoughts on the subject may not apply to turning.
I’ve found Inlace products to be excellent. They look nice and work easily. Crushing Turquoise or Malachite stones is a less expensive alternative, but the variety of colors is lacking compared to Inlace. And, some pretty stones are so hard that, even if you can crush them, they do not work well after inlayed.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Kurty

10 posts in 1013 days


#4 posted 03-05-2014 01:49 AM

What an idiot…I misspelled preference. lol

View William's profile

William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#5 posted 03-09-2014 03:19 PM

I have not had the money to try crushed stones or minerals, so I’ve been experimenting with other materials found in the kitchen.
I’ve tried salt, pepper, sugar, coffee grounds, grits, rice and oatmeal.
All of them turn well except sugar. It had some kind of reaction with CA glue and turned to a gummy mess.
My favorite so far has been coffee grounds.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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mahdee

3555 posts in 1234 days


#6 posted 03-09-2014 03:29 PM

That is interesting William. Have you ever tried to put dried flowers and things like that in CA ?

-- earthartandfoods.com

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William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#7 posted 03-09-2014 04:15 PM

No I haven’t, but that sounds like another idea to try in the future.
I am learning that just about anything can be turned as long as it’s softer than you tools and it is bonded well to your main structural material.
I forgot, I filled a gap with sand once too. It looks like sawdust and dulled the tools quickly though.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#8 posted 03-09-2014 04:18 PM

Here is one I done yesterday.
It is cherry burl. The dark brown is the bark. The almost black is coffee grounds.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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mahdee

3555 posts in 1234 days


#9 posted 03-09-2014 04:34 PM

Man, that looks really nice. I use coffee to make some of my soap; good stuff. I used a copper wire on a turning project but the glue hadn’t set in and knocked it off. Will try again.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#10 posted 03-09-2014 06:10 PM

You probably already know this, but when using any kind of soft metal, be sure to rough it up with 220 grit to give the glue something to grab to.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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mahdee

3555 posts in 1234 days


#11 posted 03-09-2014 07:28 PM

I bet that is exactly what happened. I rushed myself and didn’t even wipe the oil off of it. Blamed it on the epoxy anyways.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View William's profile

William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#12 posted 03-09-2014 09:44 PM

The first time I done inlay on a pen using sheets of copper, I just glued it in. It blew apart on the lathe.
Next time I roughed up the metal material and it held together fine.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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mahdee

3555 posts in 1234 days


#13 posted 03-09-2014 10:29 PM

Yes,William. I was so excited that I forgot rule #1, take your time and be prepared. Ruined a nice piece of cherry. Funny, every time I read “hear” your response its just so muffled; it must be the mask you are wearing. Just crazy how our brain interprets everything based on what we see. I have a voice developed in my consciousness for every LJ’s with a picture. Just like when I listen to the radio, I imagine a picture for every voice, and 90% of the time the image is soooooooo wrong. Glad I can hear you loud and clear through that respirator.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Woodendeavor

276 posts in 2074 days


#14 posted 03-10-2014 12:36 AM

I am using metal powders in a plastic resin. I am just starting to experiment with patina applied to copper fill

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mahdee

3555 posts in 1234 days


#15 posted 03-10-2014 12:54 AM

Ammonia, sea-salt, pee, bleach and just about every corrosive agent produces a different color in copper and brass.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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