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Crosscuts on a TS

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Forum topic by Medickep posted 03-03-2014 10:12 PM 1460 views 0 times favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Medickep

371 posts in 461 days


03-03-2014 10:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource

I remember people here telling me a crosscut sled is a must have and I believe I now know why, but I’m not sure!!

Today I was cutting some plywood on the TS. I had a lady at HD break it down a little to fit in my car, but she was so terribly off, I called it good enough. When I got home I found myself needing to crosscut a piece of wood, which was 11.5” wide and 4’ in length. It was too wide for my chop saw that is non sliding.

I attempted to use the miter gauge off my TS and squared it up to an artificial fence attached to my real fence. But I noticed it was almost impossible to keep it perfectly square with the blade and ended using the rollers off of my chop saw as a stop. I made half of the cut, than flipped the wood and made the other one. I had a little error as the blade was touching opposite ends!!

Is this what a crosscut sled would excel in? if so, I need one ASAP!!

Thanks

-- Keith


40 replies so far

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 794 days


#1 posted 03-03-2014 10:24 PM

From what I understand, and Im eager to hear the gurus (ahem knotscott) input, for what you just described, a crosscut sled would help you out bigtime on the 11 1/2” wide part of the problem, but 4’ is a long piece my friend! I dont usually push a piece that big alone, Ill use a circular saw. A huge sliding table saw would do it, or the proper support system. I find myself more often cutting thing on the extremely small side.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

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Medickep

371 posts in 461 days


#2 posted 03-03-2014 11:06 PM

Well this is why I thought it would be a good topic! I really don’t have a fast system for the circular saw. So I need something!!! Crosscut sled, SCMS…..

-- Keith

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retfr8flyr

251 posts in 392 days


#3 posted 03-03-2014 11:20 PM

A crosscut sled will not help with a 4 foot cut. I will not wrestle big long pieces like that on my table saw, it’s a recipe for kickbacks. I have a track saw setup that I use to break down sheet goods and I highly recommend going that route. At the very least get a clamp edge guide setup for your circular saw. http://www.homedepot.com/p/BORA-50-in-Clamp-Edge-Circular-Saw-Jig-Saw-Router-Straight-Edge-Saw-Guide-540950/202358341?N=5yc1vZc2jtZ5it

-- Earl

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MrUnix

609 posts in 922 days


#4 posted 03-03-2014 11:25 PM

Medickep> I really don’t have a fast system for the circular saw

2×4 and some clamps :)

I gave up trying to cut large pieces of plywood on the TS long ago.. mainly because I don’t have a huge table saw that can handle them gracefully, nor do I even have the room for one. I find it much, much easier to just slap a straight edge on the plywood to use as a guide fence for my circular saw.

As for the crosscut sled.. I couldn’t get by without one. My miter guage has so much slop in it that it’s pretty much useless. Add a couple of stop blocks and you can crank out identical length pieces all day long if you want, and I’m always sure to get a perfect 90 degree cut every time. With a little creative thinking, you can also use it as a miter sled unless you want to build a dedicated one.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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bigblockyeti

1738 posts in 444 days


#5 posted 03-03-2014 11:34 PM

A sled would be great for cutting the 11 1/2” dimension, the 4’ length is a whole other story. That would require a gigantic crosscut sled! I would try to establish a straight edge on the 4’ length first, cut the opposite side parallel second, then move to the crosscut sled to square the 11 1/2” ends.

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Medickep

371 posts in 461 days


#6 posted 03-03-2014 11:53 PM

Thanks guys, I will never pretend to know what I’m doing! I want to make a cross cut sled ASAP, but at least now, I can finish my built ins first! I’m really not a fan of my circular saw even though it has a good blade on it. But it looks like I’ll be getting a guide and getting better with it.

For some reason I thought guys were using their sleds for long pieces!!

MrUnix-

If you have a cross cut sled that also does miters too, I would be much obliged to see photos, or whatever you got on it!!

Thanks everyone above!!

-- Keith

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 794 days


#7 posted 03-04-2014 12:12 AM

Keith if you have a 4ft or even a 2 ft level and a square, you can clamp that. Down the road get yourself one of the panel clamps thats clamps square and build a jig so that your saw rides in the groove. I remember when I hated my CS, and I sort of still do because its 20 lbs and I have a bad back, but after some practice, you get confident with it. My plan is to build a lumber cart for sheet goods, and incorporate a panel saw using my 20lb beast. I dont go much bigger then 2ft on my TS, and most of what I do is more the size of a deck of cards, so I use my mini table saw setup.

So the big benefit from the sled is wide cuts. If you make it a super sled, then it will do miters at any angle, as long as the square you use to set it is accurate, and your blade is accurate as well. One thing I should have asked you, does your TS3650 have the blade issues of the r4512?

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2071 posts in 1954 days


#8 posted 03-04-2014 12:18 AM

I hope I can help.
If you have a circular saw, that should be a no brainer to cross cut your plywood. Just use a guide made from anything straight. Use a square to align it. Line up your saw and cut. A good option to consider is to tape both sides of the cut with painters tape. That will help reduce tear out. Use a good blade.

I have done that in the past with good results. And you might consider this little helper. I got it at Lowe’s.

I also have a track saw. It is a Scheppach with a mix of parts such as additional track from Grizzly (identical saws; different paint scheme), track clamps made by Dewalt. I used this saw (and track) to cut a straight edge on 15 8 foot pieces of 4/4 rough maple 8 inches wide. I have two blades for this track saw. A 28 tooth rip blade made by Festool worked great ripping the rough maple. I bought it local from a tool supply company. The other blade is a 48 tooth Freud that makes great cuts, either rip or crosscut.

And then there is the cross cut sled.
Make one like mine and the heck with the naysayers! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 794 days


#9 posted 03-04-2014 12:20 AM

you could do a lot worse, thats a very nice sled stringer

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

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JayBarnes

30 posts in 309 days


#10 posted 03-04-2014 12:33 AM

I don’t know guys, I think i would be ok with this. My last sled was made from a 2’ x 4’ handy panel. I think I made few cuts on wood close to 6’ (but not squaring up the edge, but cutting say a 1 or 2 foot piece off. Obviously if your not comfortable making any cut, you shouldn’t.

Jay

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ajosephg

1857 posts in 2284 days


#11 posted 03-04-2014 12:48 AM

When I need to crosscut a long piece I cut it about 1/8 inch oversize using a circular saw with a guide. I then make the final cut with a router and a guide. A 3/8 inch dia. upcut router bit works great on 3/4 plywood (or solid wood) with a glass smooth surface and no chip out.

-- Joe

View Medickep's profile

Medickep

371 posts in 461 days


#12 posted 03-04-2014 01:12 AM

Thanks for the continued help! I really want something quick so I suppose the guide clamp will be the quickest for me on this problem. I just hate the huge offset on the skill saw and wish I had bought a sliding compound miter way back in the day, before I was even into wood working!

a level or 2×4 would work it just seems like a lot of setup for multiple cuts. I get little shop time, so I like the ease and speed!

Joe-

I’ve never heard of a blade issue with the new Rigid TS, but I have no complaints with mine, but than again I don’t know better either!

-- Keith

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2071 posts in 1954 days


#13 posted 03-04-2014 01:18 AM

@Keith – if you take a close look at the Kreg cross cut guide I linked to, you will see the adjustable leg you can set according to your circular saw offset. Then simply make a trial cut. Part of the plastic will be cut off even with the blade. Now all you have to do is line up that mark on your workpiece and run the saw across. It works pretty good.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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darthford

532 posts in 647 days


#14 posted 03-04-2014 01:28 AM

Inca Miter 5000 or one of these babies which will cross cut 16”

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The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 794 days


#15 posted 03-04-2014 01:32 AM

one thing that might help with the circ saw setup, is stacking 2 pieces and cutting both at once. If your good end is flush you ensure they are the same length, which would be helpful for built ins. The 2 pieces stacked will also create zero clearance on the inside. Throw on some tape as suggested for the outside chip out, and your good to go. I dont particularly enjoy cutting up large sheets, so I often do 2 at once, thinking less cuts is less work. I do usually cut 1/8-1/4 oversize and square up on the TS as suggested, although Im not sure Id do that with a 4ft long piece. Im eager to try Joes suggestion with the router, a glass smooth surface sounds good to me.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

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