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Tell Me, Are they saying that this can be wired to run on 220 or 440 3 phase?

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Forum topic by ohtimberwolf posted 03-03-2014 12:04 AM 655 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ohtimberwolf

303 posts in 1107 days


03-03-2014 12:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bidding delta 3 phase

Are they saying that this can be wired to run on 220 or 440 3 phase?

“great for the garage, 208 – 220/440 3 phase”

Bidding is at $200

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...


11 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

15538 posts in 1093 days


#1 posted 03-03-2014 12:29 AM

Yeah, 3 phase at either voltage. Not many homes have 3 phase power.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View unbob's profile

unbob

470 posts in 658 days


#2 posted 03-03-2014 12:45 AM

Ya! don’t buy it.
Leave it for those that know how easy it is to run 3phase machines on single phase power. We want to keep paying low prices for those machines!

Ha, those that say 3phase is a deal breaker-you have to buy a new single phase motor-thank you very much!!

View Loren's profile

Loren

7832 posts in 2403 days


#3 posted 03-03-2014 01:40 AM

For you, you’ll need 220v 3 phase. To get that you’ll need
a 220v line and a phase converter.

3 phase motors frequently are dual voltage and changing the
voltage is just a matter of switching some wires around. There’s
usually a diagram. Baldor has a standard wire coding system and
I’ll bet that saw’s motor follows it.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1768 posts in 1182 days


#4 posted 03-03-2014 02:03 AM

A 220 V single phase input 220 V 3Ph output variable frequency drive (VFD) would also do the job with the output set to ramp up to 60Hz every time you pressed the start button. This would give the added advantage of controlled stopping, when you pressed the stop button. A few extra $$ well spent.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

303 posts in 1107 days


#5 posted 03-03-2014 02:18 AM

Thanks, I can get 220 to the place the saw would be setting but would I need to rewire the motor AND get a VFD?

larry

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

View REO's profile

REO

676 posts in 829 days


#6 posted 03-03-2014 02:27 AM

actually all motors follow the same rules for numbering leads. Both single phase and three phase motors can be run on one voltage or double the voltage. not all motors are easy to change because the individual windings are not always brought out to a “customer serviceable” location. What makes a difference in voltage is whether the windings are paired in series or parallel. single phase motors are also reversible whether they say so or not. it takes a little digging and some testing to find the right leads buried in the motor but a little patience and the correct info and anyone capable of wiring a three way switch can accomplish it. it requires rewinding the motor to change from three phase to single phase though, and in many cases the architecture of the motor prevents this possibility. it is ok to run a 208 3 ph motor on 220. at 208-220 the windings are paired in parallel. for 480 they are configured in series.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1768 posts in 1182 days


#7 posted 03-03-2014 02:32 AM

Call Automationdirect.com and speak to a sales rep he will answer all your questions and help you get the right unit for your application, at the right price.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

303 posts in 1107 days


#8 posted 03-03-2014 12:50 PM

Thanks guys, it gets a little confusing. I’ll see what I can find out and do so I’ll end this post. Thanks again. larry

You have been very helpful.

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

View crank49's profile

crank49

3524 posts in 1726 days


#9 posted 03-03-2014 03:37 PM

Ohtimberwolf, your motor is a 3 phase motor, it has to have 3 phase power.
You can get 3 phase power with a converter.

A VFD (variable frequency drive) is one type of converter you can use; it’s a small electronic box.
A rotary converter is another type of converter you could use; it looks like a motor.
And finally, a static converter would probably work, it’s a box containing mostly capacitors.

The VFD is the newest design and probably the best method

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1813 posts in 475 days


#10 posted 03-03-2014 04:19 PM

You won’t have to rewire the motor, any more than making sure you have a proper cord from the motor to the VFD, static or rotary phase converter. The VFD setup is pretty simple and can give you many acceleration, speed control and braking options, though these benefits are usually better utilized on a drill press or lathe. The static converters are the cheapest but typically only give you 2/3 the motor nameplate horse power. Rotary converters are the most expensive, but give you true 3 phase power and are usually sized for multiple machines at once.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

303 posts in 1107 days


#11 posted 03-03-2014 05:08 PM

Thanks again all of you as you have helped me a great deal. Now to see what happens at the auction. larry

-- Used to be a barn cat, now a lap cat...

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