LumberJocks

Joining waterfall edge on live edge table

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by CharlesA posted 02-27-2014 04:04 PM 3338 views 2 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1929 posts in 552 days


02-27-2014 04:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining

I’m making a live edge coffee table for a friend’s daughter for her wedding (her choice). I need to take another look at the piece at the sawmill this week, but I’d like to make one end this waterfall style (I don’t know if I coined that or not).

How would you join it? I’m thinking that I cut the two edges at 45 degrees, and then use glue with either 3/4 or 1” dowels or loose tenons.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


22 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3575 posts in 1567 days


#1 posted 02-27-2014 05:43 PM

Aesthetically those are amazing. Structurally however, I don’t like that type of joint.
I have seen them made successfully with a Domino joiner. Does your local rental center have one?

A central lower rail with through tenon and large shoulders would also help keep the table from racking when someone sits on it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1833 posts in 522 days


#2 posted 02-27-2014 05:51 PM

CharlesA, Check out my projects; I have 2 with the waterfall effect. Nop, you didn’t coin the word. You cut them at 45, but you have to make another 45 cut as well.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Tooch's profile

Tooch

700 posts in 630 days


#3 posted 02-27-2014 06:01 PM

how about biscuits? also, I’d add a metal angle bracket (or wood, i suppose) underneath

-- "Well, the world needs ditch-diggers too..." - Judge Smails

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2765 posts in 1105 days


#4 posted 02-27-2014 06:30 PM

Full blind dovetails.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 824 days


#5 posted 02-27-2014 06:53 PM

Ive been thinking about doing that to a 9 ft slab. I agree the domino would be the way to go, but I dont have one. If I had a biscuit joiner, Id use that. As it is, I was thinking of a hidden spline, and dovetailed keys in a contrasting color.

For this project I might step away from wood glue and go with an epoxy. My other thoughts are to use live edge slabs (smaller) from the same batch of wood to make aprons, with the live edge pointing to the floor. Would be plenty strong, but the minimalist look is no apron. Also, if the main slab had checking on one or both ends at the corner, I would think youd have to do something to the underside. This looks amazing, but fragile to me.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1593 posts in 1124 days


#6 posted 02-27-2014 07:22 PM

You can look up the old episodes of Rough Cut, Tommy Mac did a nice one. He cut the miters and then basically did a hand version of the domino. He cut a bunch of square blocks and then cut a slot on each miter so the block would rest half in each board. I’m pretty sure at some point in that episode he said “C’mon guys, you can do this, it’s not that hard.” So it’s probably really easy.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 824 days


#7 posted 02-27-2014 07:28 PM

I was thinking of doing the same thing using a slot cutting router bit.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1929 posts in 552 days


#8 posted 02-27-2014 07:34 PM

Thanks everyone. Since the domino is a loose tenon joint, looks like most of you are suggesting loose tenons. I can’t see how biscuits would add strength in this kind of joint—I would think the joint would stress them at their weakest point.

MrJinx, I looked at your projects. How did you do the joints? What do you mean by an extra 45 degree cut?

How would epoxy add strength over wood glue if glued joints are typically stronger than the wood? Is there something about this joint that would make the glued joint weaker than usual?

The bride to be wants a shelf, but I haven’t committed to that yet. If I can find an organic shelf solution, it could conceivably add strength.

Full blind dovetail would be cool—seems like easy to screw up.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1833 posts in 522 days


#9 posted 02-27-2014 07:48 PM

When you cut a piece of wood at 45, in order to create a 45 degree angle with the two pieces, you have to flip one of them around. That is not feasible for the outcome you are looking for. Therefore, you have to cut the board that has the 45 protruding at 45 degree so both ends are cut at 45 degree inwards. (I hope this makes sense). I used TBII glue and the drawer serves as reinforcements. I think it works just fine with it as you mentioned, the glue is stronger than the wood. Mind you the desk is 3” thick and by the time you cut it at 45 degree, the cut is more than 3”; so there is a lot of bonding surfaces. I assume it would make it very difficult to align the grain exactly if you used dowels and or fasteners. The desk is 2 years old and the coffee table 1

-- earthartandfoods.com

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 824 days


#10 posted 02-27-2014 07:52 PM

Charles I just like epoxy for this one because its a clear and strong glue. The slightest bit of missed wood glue, or damage to the wood removing it could mess up the whole look. Your bound to have squeeze out, especially on the waterfall checked parts. With epoxy you could just brush it in as it squeezes out and put your finish over top. Heck you could even do an epoxy finish but that gets pricey.

Im sure you know that a straight glued miter isnt a super strong joint, its all end grain. Prepping the grain first helps, but this is why most people reinforce them. Hey Maybe you just put in some pocket screws and hide them? Not very traditional but would work, be strong, and hidden.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1929 posts in 552 days


#11 posted 02-27-2014 07:57 PM

Mrjinx, thanks. I had assumed that cut, I thought you were referring to something more exotic.

Found some instructions on full blind dovetails. Very interesting.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1474 posts in 709 days


#12 posted 02-27-2014 08:00 PM

I was think a full blind dovetail or a sliding dovetail. One stretcher down the middle with a through tenon cut like a dovetail key could add a cool look. At least it sounds good in my head…

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View Woodendeavor's profile

Woodendeavor

228 posts in 1361 days


#13 posted 02-27-2014 08:24 PM

Tage Frid used a method he call full blind multiple splined miters. It looks simple to do reading his books but I have not tried it

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1115 days


#14 posted 02-27-2014 09:25 PM

Here’s how I did it.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

1929 posts in 552 days


#15 posted 02-28-2014 01:08 AM

I think the full blind multiple splined miters may be a winner.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase