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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 02-26-2014 02:54 PM 2599 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


02-26-2014 02:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jointer

I’m assuming this is a 110 or 110/220 unit. Any idea of the 110 amperage? It’s up for auction locally. I’m hoping to re-wire for 220 at some point, but not there yet. I’m assuming an older jointer like this is rock solid/no surprises. If you have any insight, chime in.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


20 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15678 posts in 2474 days


#1 posted 02-26-2014 02:58 PM

I think that LJ ToddJB has the same style jointer. I think thats a 50’s era machine.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#2 posted 02-26-2014 03:15 PM

Because of the logo and cast iron stand, that jointer is from the 1940s and 1950s. I know that 6” Delta jointer was made up through the mid 1970s as I bought mine new around that time. The logo was then badged as a “Rockwell-Delta” machine. I can tell you it is a very solid machine with almost nothing to go wrong. Replacement blades are readily available and are inexpensive. If the price is good, go for it!

Note: Regarding used woodworking machine prices. My rule of thumb is a used machine is worth about half of its new cost if it is in excellent shape. The price goes down as the condition diminishes. For machines that are no longer produced and parts for it are not available through the manufacturer, its a judgement call. Some old machines are BETTER than the new machines, some are worse.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 3271 days


#3 posted 02-26-2014 03:17 PM

Looks like a long bed 37-220, if I had to guess. Missing one of the hand wheels, on the left.

Very hard to date precisely, that was Delta’s golden age. The closed bases disappeared around 1960. Here is one from the late 50's . The base of the jointer (not the stand) on similar models had a flared lip that disappeared circa 1952. Here is a very similar 1953 model.

Manual can be downloaded here

They were designed to take a wide range of motors, from 110V 1/3 hp, 220V, all the way up to 3-phase for industrial use.

Looks like it needs some work, but it would be a superb machine. Love the cast iron stand.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#4 posted 02-26-2014 03:24 PM

Thanks, folks. This is very helpful.

So, if I am reading this correctly:

1) I would need to verify the motor since this could have a variety of motors 110, 110/220, or 220
2) I would need to find a replacement hand wheel. Hard to find?

Charles

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4823 posts in 2516 days


#5 posted 02-26-2014 03:35 PM

pay no more than $250.00/300.00 for it.
Probably a 1/2 or 3/4 HP motor , 110/220 Volts.
I would guess 6/7 Amps on 110Volts

-- Bert

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Minorhero

372 posts in 2073 days


#6 posted 02-26-2014 03:47 PM

Handwheels are easy to find. You can buy new ones for cheap or pay slightly more for an original part off of eBay. It will likely be missing a belt guard as the original belt guards were sold as an accessory. Keep in mind that any machine of this age will likely need bearings replaced in the motor and on the cutterhead. If you are unwilling to do that level of work then let this one go. That being said, these are rock solid machines and the cast iron bases intact is relatively rare, so if I were in the market for a jointer I wouldn’t hesitate to drop 250 on this one.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4823 posts in 2516 days


#7 posted 02-26-2014 03:56 PM

Charles, in “wood-working” what I like to do best is not wood-working but to repair and to restore old machine.
If this is not your cup of tea or if you are not talented or if you do not have the tooling for such a thing, pass on this one.
I bought a much more recent Delta in very good shape for $250.00.

-- Bert

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#8 posted 02-26-2014 04:04 PM

Thanks again, everyone. I appreciate the cautions. I get emails from a local auction site, and they don’t usually have anything I’m interested in. This time there is this jointer and a 220v powermatic planer. I’m up for replacing hand wheels, re-wiring the motor, etc., but overhauling, bearings, and such take up time I’d rather spend woodworking.`

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13529 posts in 1324 days


#9 posted 02-26-2014 04:10 PM

All of this said, it still might be worth going to look at. It may purr like a kitten, be 110 and all you need is a hand wheel.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#10 posted 02-26-2014 04:16 PM

Good point. It appears to be a tool used in a high school shop class or used by the school district in their buildings and grounds operations.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1765 days


#11 posted 02-26-2014 04:37 PM

If it’s from a school it may be three phase, but I can’t tell from that plug. I would NOT be scared of owning this over one built later, there is essentially no difference. And if you end up paying too much for it take comfort in the fact that all the value is in the Art Deco base – you can resell it and get most of your money back. It looks like the 6 inch long bed – much more useful than the short bed. McMaster Carr or ebay for hand cranks.

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#12 posted 02-26-2014 04:39 PM

I’m guessing it is from the school district buildings and grounds rather than from a shop class, given that the other items in the auction are for lawn tractors, doors, light fixtures, etc.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#13 posted 02-26-2014 04:41 PM

Here’s a pic of the cord. If you want to see the listing with all four pics, have at it: http://www.beckortauctions.com/index.php?subp=1&slb=1&pid=36169&cid=35198

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13529 posts in 1324 days


#14 posted 02-26-2014 04:52 PM

Looks like a 110 cord to me and I like that fence better than the one on my grizzly.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4823 posts in 2516 days


#15 posted 02-26-2014 05:07 PM

The plug looks 110 but I use the very same plugs for 220, which is not customary.
I would say the it is wired for 110Volts/one phase and there is some dust collection system on it.
All the belts guards are on it.
I would go have a look at it.
Charles, what is the asking price?

-- Bert

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