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Help with Bandsaw Blade MX

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Forum topic by airfieldman posted 146 days ago 461 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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airfieldman

177 posts in 2406 days


146 days ago

I need help. I can’t seem to keep my blades clean. As seen in the photo. I’m simply stumped. Am I doing something wrong or is this common. If it’s me, what is it I’m doing. If it’s common, what do you do to correct it?

-- Measure with a micrometer, mark with a crayon, cut it with a chainsaw.


9 replies so far

View hydro's profile

hydro

208 posts in 347 days


#1 posted 146 days ago

Looks like you have too many teeth/inch for the thickness of the material you are cutting, and/or it is a gummy material that is sticking in the tooth gullets. Either way I suggest switching to a blade with the same width but half the tooth/inch count and a “Skip Tooth” profile. That will increase the gullet area between the teeth and give the sawdust somewhere to go as you cut. The object here is to give the sawdust room between the teeth and not pack it into the gullets.

For efficient cutting with a band saw you want to have a blade with a tooth count that puts at least three teeth into the thickness of the stock you are cutting, but at the same time you want the teeth as large as possible without sacrificing the quality of the cut.

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2437 posts in 947 days


#2 posted 146 days ago

What Hydro said, get a skip tooth blade.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

534 posts in 907 days


#3 posted 146 days ago

Are you cutting 2×4’s maybe? I ran a bunch thru for a friend, took me 2 weeks to get my blade back to clean.

Yes, you have too many teeth, but I think you also have gummy wood.

-- Dan V. in Indy

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airfieldman

177 posts in 2406 days


#4 posted 146 days ago

Thanks all…That makes sense. I was using this for making reindeer. The one’s you cut on two sides of a block and end up with a caricature of the beast. There are some very tight radii so I needed a narrow blade.

Dan, you said it took a while to get the blade clean. How?

-- Measure with a micrometer, mark with a crayon, cut it with a chainsaw.

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

534 posts in 907 days


#5 posted 146 days ago

Mineral spirits and a brass brush, but that was really slow. Then I ran it thru a little bees wax block, that made it look terrible! Thought I was going to have to buy a new blade. But then, I ran some oak thru, resawn, it got warm, the wax came off, and pulled a lot of the sap with it. Eventually, it has returned to a like new condition.

FWIW- this Carter blade is the first 1/2 blade I’ve owned that I would have gone to the trouble to save. I have had great luck with it, and it cuts straight as an arrow.

I did some band saw boxes a few years back, used a Timber Wolf, small with many teeth. Only got three boxes out of that blade. And it was slow cutting, push too hard and it would turn the blade.

-- Dan V. in Indy

View hydro's profile

hydro

208 posts in 347 days


#6 posted 146 days ago

To clean a blade, fold it up and soak it in a pan of household ammonia overnight. Be sure to cover the pan to contain the fumes. The sap will dissolve away without any scrubbing. To fold a blade, check this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z45BIMQ3WlM

-- Minnesota Woodworkers Guild, Past President, Lifetime member.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3340 posts in 2556 days


#7 posted 146 days ago

OK! Get the right blade, when it needs cleaning soak in a warm water solution of Arm & Hammer WASHING SODA. Didja get that it was SODA instead of baking soda? Brush the blade with a parts washing brush, and get back to work.
I’ve been touting the washing soda for many posts, but it has been ignored. Don’t know why ‘cause it is quick, enviro-friendly, cheap, etc.
No fumes as with ammonia or other highly caustic solvents, and it’ll clean your hands at the same time. :)
I will gladly defend my opinion if any others want to contest my choice.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View airfieldman's profile

airfieldman

177 posts in 2406 days


#8 posted 146 days ago

This is great advice. Now I have 3 ways to chose from. Being the lazy natured guy that I am, I would expect to go the easy, soak overnight and be done. But, since we don’t keep ammonia in the house, maybe not. I do like idea of enviro-friendly. But the brushing sounds monotonous.
I think I’ll try the bees wax.

Thanks everyone.

-- Measure with a micrometer, mark with a crayon, cut it with a chainsaw.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10533 posts in 1286 days


#9 posted 146 days ago

Hydro’s advice can’t be improved on.

For cleaning, I soak mine overnight in the purple formula “Simple Green” and spray them off with water the next morning. Sparkling! I clean my drum sander belts the same way.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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