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Wood ID help - looks like cedar, but HEAVY

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Forum topic by ADHDan posted 02-21-2014 04:57 PM 868 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ADHDan

649 posts in 893 days


02-21-2014 04:57 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I snagged this board for free from a pallet/scrap pile consisting mostly of SPF and cedar, some pressure-treated, but also a little bit of cherry, oak, etc. I have no idea what this is – it looks kind of like cedar, but it is really heavy/dense. I ripped one edge to show the grain but I haven’t planed/sanded it yet (I’m a little hesitant to run it through my planer even though I don’t think there is any metal in it; I could shave one face on my table saw thought).

Any ideas what it could be? It looks nice, and I have the opportunity to pick up more boards if it’s worthwhile.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.


15 replies so far

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

311 posts in 404 days


#1 posted 02-21-2014 05:39 PM

This is where we all make guesses and throw out a bunch of names. :)

How about a type of Eucalyptus. It fits both the color and that it’s dense. Just a guess though.

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patcollins

1035 posts in 1649 days


#2 posted 02-21-2014 05:41 PM

It looks alot like the chestnut boards that were stored in my grandfathers garage for 50 years.

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BinghamtonEd

1615 posts in 1154 days


#3 posted 02-21-2014 05:50 PM

I’ll probably get called a fool for this, but I’m going to go with good ol’ heart pine.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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ADHDan

649 posts in 893 days


#4 posted 02-21-2014 06:15 PM

I would guess some sort of softwood based on what else was in the pile, but it is REALLY heavy – and it doesn’t look pressure treated.

As long as it’s free, I suppose I might as well pick up the rest of it and see how it mills out. If it turns out to be nothing special I’ll just burn or donate it.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Randy_ATX's profile

Randy_ATX

705 posts in 1226 days


#5 posted 02-21-2014 06:29 PM

A clear photo of fresh cut endgrain would help in the identification too.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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WDHLT15

1237 posts in 1260 days


#6 posted 02-23-2014 12:41 PM

It is a softwood. looks like lodgepole pine.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Don W

15759 posts in 1352 days


#7 posted 02-23-2014 12:45 PM

Hemlock?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2854 posts in 1135 days


#8 posted 02-23-2014 02:03 PM

I’m going to say pine, but really need an end grain shot to make an ID.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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ADHDan

649 posts in 893 days


#9 posted 02-24-2014 03:31 PM

Here’s a fresh crosscut. Perhaps it could be pine with incredibly high moisture content?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

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bondogaposis

2854 posts in 1135 days


#10 posted 02-24-2014 04:25 PM

Well it is very wet, that would explain the weight also very tight grained. I’m sticking with pine.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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richardwootton

1519 posts in 739 days


#11 posted 02-24-2014 07:29 PM

Looks like some old growth pine or other soft wood with growth rings that tight.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

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ADHDan

649 posts in 893 days


#12 posted 02-24-2014 08:16 PM

I did get a few more pieces of the same lumber. Once they acclimate would they be worth using in a project, or better off in the fireplace?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

438 posts in 1782 days


#13 posted 02-24-2014 08:35 PM

I could not begin to guess the species, but you do need to sharpen your saw blade or hand saw. Tearout is atrocious.

Greg

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ADHDan

649 posts in 893 days


#14 posted 02-24-2014 08:43 PM

Agreed. It was a quick cut on my miter saw with an old blade I use for rough work.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3277 posts in 1271 days


#15 posted 02-24-2014 09:07 PM

Not really sure, but it looks like you have some of what use to be nice Doug fir there, unfortunately it is now full of mold and mildew.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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