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Forum topic by Ben posted 02-19-2014 03:13 AM 532 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ben

203 posts in 1523 days


02-19-2014 03:13 AM

Currently building a paint grade kitchen.
Upper doors will be about 34” tall.
I plan to make them 7/8” thick (ideal for my cope and stick set) with a glued-in 1/4” mdf panel.

I know this will be plenty strong, but I’m a bit concerned with the door being “flappy” and easily twisted.
Is this of any concern?

This is a pretty typical approach, right? But these doors are a bit on the tall side. Widest door is about 15”.

Thanks, if you can put my mind at ease.


8 replies so far

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2758 days


#1 posted 02-19-2014 03:28 AM

Typical uppers are ~26” and depends if inset or overlay.

Your doors are taller, and thicker then standards (3/4” thick)

The width of your styles and rails will make a difference. I’m doing a kitchen set now, doors have 2” styles and rails with 1/4” inset plywood. They are solid. If you using 7/8 thick stock, I think they will be plenty solid.

-- Nicky

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Ben

203 posts in 1523 days


#2 posted 02-19-2014 03:31 AM

Thanks, Nicky.

I plan on using 2 5/8” wide stiles and rails. They will be overlaid about 5/8”.

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Nicky

636 posts in 2758 days


#3 posted 02-19-2014 03:44 AM

That’s a beefy door. Share some pics when you’re done.

Good luck with your project.

-- Nicky

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1516 days


#4 posted 02-19-2014 05:02 AM

In my world stiles and rails are typically 2.25”. To my eye, anything narrower looks chincy and anything wider looks needlessly big.

The height of the doors could mitigate the latter. The advantage of the thickness (cutters nothwithstanding) eludes me.

Kindly,

Lee.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View reedwood's profile

reedwood

882 posts in 1342 days


#5 posted 02-19-2014 01:56 PM

I’d use three hinges.
and seriously consider 1/2 ply panels with a rabbet on the back. 1/4” panels make it seem cheap and lightweight.
MDF 1/4 panels, to me, are garage/ laundry room grade.

If you’re upgrading the size of the frame, a panel upgrade seems appropriate. just a thought,

-- Mark - I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.

View ducky911's profile

ducky911

223 posts in 1455 days


#6 posted 02-19-2014 07:38 PM

I’d use three hinges.
and seriously consider 1/2 ply panels with a rabbet on the back. 1/4” panels make it seem cheap and lightweight.
MDF 1/4 panels, to me, are garage/ laundry room grade.

If you’re upgrading the size of the frame, a panel upgrade seems appropriate. just a thought,

—mark

...+1…agree

View Ben's profile

Ben

203 posts in 1523 days


#7 posted 02-23-2014 12:01 AM

Here’s what I’ve decided to do:
I’m going to forego the cope and stick, do a real mortise and tenon joint, and use solid pine 1/2” panels with a reverse raise to fit into the 1/4” slot.

Customer really wants this and I was leaning towards mortise and tenon anyway as I hate the cope and stick back-and-forth setups. I also couldn’t find a decent 1/2” plywood around here. But one of my lumberyards sells a nice a 1/2” X 12” clear pine for a reasonable price.

Hope this isn’t a mistake and that the panel movement will eventually make the paint look like hell.

Thanks!

View reedwood's profile

reedwood

882 posts in 1342 days


#8 posted 02-23-2014 12:21 AM

Sure, that would work.
But if it’s paint grade, I’d consider using Baltic birch 1/2 plywood (no football patches) or make the panels out of solid 1/2” poplar instead of pine. I assume you’re building the rest of the kitchen fronts out of poplar? again, that would be my choice, if not upgraded to maple.

If you haven’t started, consider buying prefinished maple plywood for the boxes. so nice and so much easier.

As far as panel movement, it’s a good time of year to build as everything is dry. if you’re really worried about it, you could pre prime the panels – I never do. just don’t glue or caulk them in.

it’s a big project!.... have fun!

-- Mark - I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude.

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