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Reattaching veneer

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Forum topic by greatview posted 02-18-2014 04:38 PM 1031 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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greatview

110 posts in 2617 days


02-18-2014 04:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veneer repair question

I’ve got some antique dining chairs with mahogany veneer that is coming loose. There is a base structural material with a veneer on either side and then the mahogany veneer on top of that. So, there are really five layers – mahogany, another veneer, base material, another veneer and the mahogany veneer.

My question is how do I fix these? What type of glue? Any suggestions will help.

Thanks

-- Tom, New London, NH


6 replies so far

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shipwright

7163 posts in 2258 days


#1 posted 02-18-2014 07:21 PM

If it is really an antique, use hide glue. No need to go the hot route but do use hide glue. My favorite liquid hide glue is Old Brown Glue but any will do.
Don’t try to get the old glue out of the joint, it is not necessary and you may damage the pieces.
Plan a good clamping strategy, apply the glue warm and clamp overnight.
You can clean up any squeeze out with water on a cloth once it is well gelled. With any luck you won’t even damage the patina.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3045 days


#2 posted 02-18-2014 08:30 PM

You may have to heat the damaged area and remove the offending piece.The reason for this is usually you need to carefully remove all traces of old glue with a shapr chisel ot knife. Perhaps the cold hide glue shipwright talks of will allow you just to inject the area and clamp up I don’t know.
I just know if you want to reglue normally, if it has old hide hot applied glue you usually need to remove all of it to allow the new glue to work adhere .
Perhaps those with better knowledge of the cold hide glue will be able to advise you more.
Also they sell a kit of glue already in a syring it is not cheap for the small quantity you get but they advertise it as an inject and clamp method look it up I think it’s called chair doctor or something like that they will advise you all the very best kindest regards Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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shipwright

7163 posts in 2258 days


#3 posted 02-19-2014 12:21 AM

If the glue in it is hide glue, and if it’s an antique it is, the new LHG will dissolve the old and blend with it. There should be no need to remove any old glue. That’s partly why I said to apply it warm. Any hide glue will be a better viscosity warm as well. If it is an antique that you value at all I would not use any “modern” glues on it.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2502 days


#4 posted 02-19-2014 12:46 AM

Is the base material broken. If the carcass is broken then you most likely are going to have the veneer break again.
I have run into the problem where the base material is a soft wood and it is breaking down. The glue won’t get a proper adhesion therefore the veneer won’t adhere properly and it just comes back up after awhile.

Can you give a better description of why the veneer came off.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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greatview

110 posts in 2617 days


#5 posted 02-19-2014 01:22 PM

For the most part the base material is intact and sound. The veneer bond appears to have simply failed. I’ll try hide glue but am not sure. A few years ago I made three copies of these chairs (we wanted eight but only had five) In the picture, the original is on the right and the copy on the left. On my copy, I made the back out of solid mahogany rather than veneer and it had held up well. Maybe the real solution is for me to replace all the veneered backs.

Any thoughts??

-- Tom, New London, NH

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2502 days


#6 posted 02-21-2014 04:07 AM

I would try to repair the Veneer and if all else fails replace them.

I think you can get away with some Titebond III. That’s what I use and it has served me well.
I just clean up as much of the old glue as I can and slab some new glue in there and clamp down.

Wipe off any excess and move on.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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