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Putting Poly over BLO

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Forum topic by TheWoodenOyster posted 02-17-2014 11:24 PM 1991 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1403 days


02-17-2014 11:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut finishing

Hey guys,

This will be a quick one. I am currently doing a table out of walnut and want to finish the legs with BLO and polyurethane over the top. How long do I need to wait after I put the last coat of BLO on before I start applying poly?

The wood is nice and dry and I am in North Texas, so the temperatures (for now at least) are hovering around 60 or 70 during the daytime and 40ish during the night.

Any other tips for this process would be appreciated

Thanks again

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster


13 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 02-17-2014 11:29 PM

I couldn’t tell you because I always mix the two, but I wait 12 to 24 hours between coats for my mix. Typically the last coat takes the longest to cure.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View MisterBill's profile

MisterBill

411 posts in 1720 days


#2 posted 02-17-2014 11:46 PM

From what I have read, you need to let the BLO set for at least 5 days before you cover it with poly.

View coachmancuso's profile

coachmancuso

259 posts in 1399 days


#3 posted 02-18-2014 12:06 AM

I use wipe on and brush on poly over BLO on all kinds of wood Cedar, Ash, Pine, Walnut, Hickory, ect. Once you apply the BLO you have to let it really dry I am inn Central Fl and I let it dry at least 7 days. Once it is dry I sand it with 1000 grit lightly and than apply the poly. Good Luck

-- Coach Mancuso

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1829 days


#4 posted 02-18-2014 01:12 AM

Skip the BLO. It’s only good for starting fires.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1189 days


#5 posted 02-18-2014 02:35 AM

I coated a maple top with several heavy coats of BLO (wiping down 10 min after each application) and it still wasn’t ready after a month. I’ll never use it again unless protection isn’t a high priority and it’s being used with was.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1403 days


#6 posted 02-18-2014 05:13 AM

Yeah, I am getting a vibe that you guys are trying to get me to change my mind here. My problem is that I want to really enrich the color of the wood, but oil based poly doesn’t do a very good job of that. But BLO is super matte when used by itself and I would like some sort of sheen. I guess I could go with danish oil or waterlox. I have some waterlox already and would prefer to use what I already have

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#7 posted 02-18-2014 12:26 PM

The BLO gives a nice color on walnut, and if applied properly it can be top coated relatively soon. Apply the BLO, let it sit a few minutes (15 +/-), then wipe off all you can. You can then top coat it within a couple of days. Test it out to verify.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View The Box Whisperer's profile

The Box Whisperer

678 posts in 1538 days


#8 posted 02-18-2014 12:36 PM

Id go with danish oil, and let it cure up for 3 days. then put on your poly. works well for me.

-- "despite you best efforts and your confidence that your smarter and faster than a saw blade at 10k rpm…. your not …." - Charles Neil

View Fuzzy's profile

Fuzzy

297 posts in 3456 days


#9 posted 02-18-2014 03:20 PM

Apply a liberal amount of BLO to a piece of leftover scrap from your project … pour just a tiny bit onto a piece of glass or plastic … let them sit side-by-side until the BLO on the glass dried/cures/hardens/whatever … THEN the wood with the BLO on it is ready for the next step in your finishing schedule.

Please exercise extreme patience using this method because IT WILL TAKE SEVERAL YEARS for the BLO to dry/cure/harden/whatever. I have stripped the finish from the surface of some very old antiques, and left them on the bench … the warm afternoon sun came around, heated up the pieces … in about an hour, the BLO started oozing from deep inside the wood, back to the surface !!! Some of these pieces were well over 70-75 years old.

There are simply too many modern techniques available that will give you exactly the same effect without the nastiness and the fire hazard that BLO has … I have a can in the basement of my house … I NEVER allow that crap in my shop … I use it on shovel & wheelbarrow handles … things that dry out from exposure to the elements. That can belonged to my GRANDFATHER, and I am 66 years old … the actual cap was missing when I found the old can, and it has only a wad of “tin foil” shaped over the hole in the top … it has thickened in the can, and it looks like tar, but it still pours readily from the container, so I guess it still hasn’t dried/cured/hardened/whatever.

-- - dabbling in sarcasm is foolish … if you’re not proficient at it, you end up looking stupid … ... ...

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1403 days


#10 posted 02-18-2014 03:25 PM

For the record, I am aware of the fire hazard. I left some rags on my concrete (luckily) porch and my wife called me then next day while I was at work and told me there was a weird looking black animal on the porch. It was a pile of burnt rags. So, I do understand the hazards of working with BLO, at least now I do…

Maybe I’ll go pick up some danish oil and give it a whirl.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1472 posts in 2711 days


#11 posted 02-18-2014 03:39 PM

I use blo a lot on my finishes. Mostly mixed with something else.(poly/mineral spirits, beeswax)
BUT, having said that, I never use blo full strength. If I’m using blo exclusively, ill thin it between 25% -50% with mineral spirits.. to me, it is easier to work with and seems to dry quicker. And it still gives a nice rich glow to the wood.
I have only used it once on light woods, maple, and I’m not a fan of how it imparts such a Amber tone. If I’m using light woods, I want the wood to stay light.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#12 posted 02-18-2014 05:47 PM

If you’re going to pick up some Watco Danish oil (seems to be the most popular) be aware, it’s just a very thin varnish. Typically, when folks speak of danish oil, it’s a mix of varnish/BLO/mineral spirits (in more or less equal parts).
If you have BLO, you can mix your own and save some money. If you have varnish you can thin it (a lot, I think the Watco MSDS calls out 70%(+/-) solvents and save some money.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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WhoMe

1472 posts in 2711 days


#13 posted 02-18-2014 09:48 PM

There is also the popular 321 mix.
3 parts mineral spirits
2 parts oil based polyurethane
1 part BLO

And don’t swap the poly/blo numbers. It doesn’t seem to dry as it stays tacky for a really long time.in n my case, almost 2 weeks before sanding with mineral spirits, drying, and putting the proper mixture on that did dry fully within about 4 days.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

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