LumberJocks

Secret to blending toner?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by daviddoria posted 156 days ago 445 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View daviddoria's profile

daviddoria

46 posts in 535 days


156 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: toner shellac blending feathering

I am refinishing a table top. I stripped it entirely, sanded down to bare wood, then sprayed (HVLP) 3 very thin coats of Seal Coat dyed with TransTint. All was almost well, but I noticed a scratch and decided to try to fix it. I rubbed some denatured alcohol on the scratch with a rag to get the shellac off of about a 2 square inch spot. I sanded out the scratch, and then sprayed a few coats of the same Seal Coat + TransTInt solution over the spot, but the area surrounding the spot just kept getting darker (as I should have expected). Is there some magic to spraying just a spot like this and getting it to blend? Or do you really have to get it right the first time and do the entire surface uniformly?

Thanks,

David


10 replies so far

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

100 posts in 586 days


#1 posted 156 days ago

The only magic is spraying the repair with a small spray pattern like airbrushing but it is about impossible to make it disappear. Especially to the person who knows it is there. Many times I leave a small imperfectio because the repair mAy show just as much. Most people will never notice what we think looks terrible.

View Finisherman's profile

Finisherman

188 posts in 446 days


#2 posted 156 days ago

That can be a challenging problem to try to deal with. If you have an airbrush, you can try masking off the surrounding area and spraying the toner only onto the scratch. Then blend the surrounding area with a few coats of the toner, carefully dusted on. Next, top coat the entire surface. The bad new is that if you’ve already gotten the surface too dark, you may have to strip the surface and try again. Toners can be a wonderful tool in the finisher’s arsenal, but they are not always very forgiving of mistakes. Always remember to use light coats, as you did in this case, because you can always make the surface a little bit darker, but trying to make it lighter is usually a pain in the neck. You have my sympathy. Been there, done that.

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

901 posts in 1287 days


#3 posted 156 days ago

Nearly impossible with the transtint in the shellac. This is why sanding is so important. Did you wet the surface to look for scratches before you sprayed?
It’s also likely that if you had sealed first, without transtint, you may have seen the scratch and then would have no problem doing a spot repair.
At this point I would be resanding the entire surface, carefully, not skipping any grits. And cussing myself as I did it. This is a lesson that you will not need in the future.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

View daviddoria's profile

daviddoria

46 posts in 535 days


#4 posted 156 days ago

Sam – Would I have to resand? Or could I just wipe off all the shellac with a rag and alcohol and then just respray?

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

901 posts in 1287 days


#5 posted 156 days ago

Sure, if wiping it off gets it all off, that would be fine.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

View Dez's profile

Dez

1113 posts in 2674 days


#6 posted 156 days ago

I would wipe the darker area to remove some of it to as close as I could get and then wipe the whole thing to blend it all together, it is a matter of experience. As http://lumberjocks.com/Finisherman mentioned, an airbrush is the way to go for small areas..
I spent over ten years color matching and toning, in the cabinet and automotive finishing arenas…

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

View daviddoria's profile

daviddoria

46 posts in 535 days


#7 posted 156 days ago

Is there a particular dye application that would allow for easy repairs like this in the future? If I spray a mixture of Transtint and denatured alcohol until I get the color right and then spray the Seal Coat over that, would that make it any easier to blend a spot repair?

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

100 posts in 586 days


#8 posted 155 days ago

Yes. Depends on the wood. That method will not color the pores for Porous woods such as oak.
I typically use about 1/2 – 3/4 lb cut shellac to tone with after a sealer coat so that I dont get too much film build but the shellac binds the color. I then do another 1 lb cut thin coat other wise the top coat can lift the color

View daviddoria's profile

daviddoria

46 posts in 535 days


#9 posted 155 days ago

OSU55, hm so it doesn’t sound like you spray just alcohol + Transtint at all like I was planning to do, so you are just using the toning method that I used originally, right?

David

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

100 posts in 586 days


#10 posted 153 days ago

I have sprayed just dna + transtint and found I got better results putting just a bit of binder in, hence the 1/2 to 3/4 # shellac. The best thing for you to do is make up a practice panel, create repairs, and try some different methods. I’ve learned a lot by testing things out. I’ve re-used the same test panels by just sanding of the previous coats of stuff used.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase