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Router dado plywood line up/ s3 stock

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Forum topic by woodworkingdrew posted 02-13-2014 12:34 AM 933 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1071 days


02-13-2014 12:34 AM

I come to you my fellow woodworkers with a few questions that might make it a little easier during my glue ups and assembly.

1. I currently am using a router to make dado cuts in my plywood for the shelves of my carcass. Is there a special technique or way I should lay the plywood so that all the shelves square up perfectly?

2. How do you manage lining up dado cuts with warped or twisted plywood?

3. Finally, what are some tricks to make stock line up perfectly for a face frame? I don’t have a jointer/planer at this time however my local lumber yard sells s3 stock. Would this be sufficient if I just spent a little extra time sanding it down? Should the inside of the face frame be sanded so that it doesn’t change or alter the corner between the stile and rail?

Thanks for your help. Maybe this is just trial and error but I cant keep waisting money and time. I want to get it down the right way.

-- Andrew, California


6 replies so far

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jmos

736 posts in 1831 days


#1 posted 02-13-2014 02:22 PM

I’ll try a couple of those:

1 – a lot of folks make a t-square type jig for dados. The T portion registers on the face of the side and the router rides on the leg. Just make sure you jig is square. Of course you can also make dados on the table saw with a dado stack. Depending on your available equipment, and the size of your tablesaw and workpieces, it might be easier or harder.

2 – Buy flat plywood. Better grade stuff is more likely to be flat. It will be hard to work twisted stock. If you have to, you might want to try clamping the sides together with the inside faces together and everything lined up flush and square. You can then mark out your dados on the edges, and you’ll know they are in the same place. Short of that, measure carefully.

3 – not entirely sure what your asking; face frame parts lining up with the case, or the frame parts lining up with each other to make a tight frame, or the case parts lining up so the frame sits flush? Really the key for all is starting with good flat stock that is properly 4-squared and cut to consistent lengths. Often the material from lumber yards, while it says S2S or S4S, it’s not really squared. They may plane both sides, but almost never joint it, so you have a smooth face that is not really flat. If you have to go this route, bring a straight edge with you when shopping and try to get the best boards you can. Eventually you’ll get the hand or power tools that will allow you to make the boards flat and square, and you’ll have much better luck. Sanding is a really slow, difficult, and inefficient, way to square stock. It’s likely to be very frustrating.

-- John

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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1071 days


#2 posted 02-13-2014 05:00 PM

John- Thanks for your detailed answers. Regarding question 3, the problem I am having is finding square enough stock. the s3 stuff at my local lumber yard is surfaced on both sides and one edge is complete. The stock I end up with seems to be twisted or curved in one way or the other. I am not one to skimp on cheap tools, therefore I am waiting until I can afford a nice jointer/ planer. Even though it may cost a little more, I am looking for square enough stock that will get my buy in the interim until I can afford those tools.

-- Andrew, California

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jmos

736 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 02-13-2014 08:52 PM

Andrew,

It doesn’t surprise me it’s twisted. Likely planed both sides, but never jointed. Twisted/cupped/bowed wood is no fun to work with.

Do you know anyone who does woodworking; might be able to use their shop for the milling?

Hand planes will allow you to mill lumber for less upfront cost, but their is a significant, but mostly fun, learning curve.

All that aside, if you are going to a real lumber yard, not a big box store, you might be able to pay them to joint and then plane the boards. It will cost you something, but at least you’ll be starting with better stock.

My local hardwood dealer sells almost exclusively S2S. By the time I take it home and mill it, I can’t get 3/4” stock starting with 4/4 boards. If I really need 3/4” I have to start with 5/4 stock.

-- John

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Rick

8287 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 02-14-2014 06:20 AM

Hi Andrew:

I guess you realize that this forum is “Lumberjocks Site Feedback”. i.e. anything to do with Problems People are having with the Site.

There are 2 or 3 “Wood Related” Forums that you might get more Responses from.

NOT Trying to be a Smart Ass. Just trying to help.

Regards: Rick

This is one of them “Woodworking Skill Share” HERE

There is also one on “Wood & Lumber”. HERE

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1071 days


#5 posted 02-14-2014 06:30 AM

Rick- Thanks for the help. I reposted this in both the forums you advised. – Andrew

-- Andrew, California

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Rick

8287 posts in 2495 days


#6 posted 02-14-2014 09:23 PM

My Pleasure Andrew. ALSO …... Thank YOU ..For The “Thank You”! Doesn’t happen all that much around here anymore.

In fact I debated if I was going to post what I did here because of that Overall “Lack Of Appreciation”.

Sorry for the Rant but it gets to me and a few others who just don’t bother doing it anymore because of that.

That’s NOT what this Site should be about.

Hope you get everything straightened out.

Regards: Rick

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

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