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Miter Cut Placement

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Forum topic by Steve Kreins posted 02-12-2014 01:50 PM 660 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Steve Kreins

358 posts in 1092 days


02-12-2014 01:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: miter cuts question

When you are cutting a series of 45 degree cuts say for a box, how do you know where to start the cut so you come out at the opposite edge and don’t end up with a short side? I am making a box and I eyeballed my cuts with a compound miter saw. I started my cuts right at the edge of the piece and they came out fairly well, but there must be a better way. I was off by a degree or two on one cut which left me with a separation to fill.

-- I thank God for everything, especially all of you!


4 replies so far

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#1 posted 02-12-2014 02:02 PM

Use a stop block and cut the parts before making any adjustments to cut another piece. That way, even if your measurements are off a little bit from what you planned, it won’t matter…the important part is that the opposing sides are the same length.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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NoLongerHere

893 posts in 2137 days


#2 posted 02-12-2014 02:14 PM

Ah…the fun part of woodworking, a square frame with four perfect 45s with tight joints.

not so much one answer but several:
a new 60 tooth blade
bump the miter box past 45 the slightest amount – test cuts to perfect
use a mechanical pencil to mark a 90 degree short point in place
fit each one to the next, let the project do the measuring.
a sliding cut is always better than a plunge cut. sometimes, you can micro shim a plunge cut to make it work.
knowing your miter fence is square and clean
do multiple cuts and sneak up on the perfect cut
cut long pieces first. make extra pieces and expect one to be short.
avoid settling for fillers in open joints, they always show.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 02-12-2014 02:18 PM

I don’t have one, so I can’t provide actual feedback on one, but others have had good success with sneaking up on the fit with a shooting board. That would also allow you to compensate for any cut not being a perfect 45 from the saw.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#4 posted 02-12-2014 02:18 PM

The above posts are correct, another thing to look for is that saw dust isn’t building up against your stop blocks and fence. Opposite sides have to be absolutely the same length.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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