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$15 Defiance plane

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Forum topic by MikeinSC posted 02-09-2014 03:45 PM 816 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeinSC

58 posts in 710 days


02-09-2014 03:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: stanley defiance

I stopped into an antique store the other day, turned to my left and looked into a bucket of rusty things. At the bottom I see a wooden pistol grip, reached in and hoped for the best. When it came out I was surprised to not be disappointed because it was attached to a plane. I couldn’t tell at first what it was before reaching because it was dark and buried under other crap. I glanced over the piece and everything was there. The adjustment knob turned but only with a little force. I flipped the plane over to inspect the blade. Despite being covered in rust, it was easy to tell it still held a sharp, knick free edge.

I asked the proprietor how much for the wall hanger to which she replied ”$15”. Sold.

A few hours later and I’m back at my house. I pulled it apart, flattened the bottom to a nice glossy smooth, ran the knife over some 220 grit and pulled out some salvaged poplar.

Over the next hour or two I had flattened out enough poplar to build the base of a new desk. This, I have never done before.

This is not technically the first plane I’ve ever bought. Just last week I bought the Windsor #33 from Habor Freight. Thats a P.O.S. and that’s the end of that story.

I’m doing a self study crash course on planes. I think this is a Jack Plane. It measures 14” by 2 3/8”. It has C116 stamped under the lever cap and Defiance on the blade. I didn’t see the Defiance until moments ago when I was taking the pics. The adjustment knob is brass.

If anyone can help me wade through the murky waters of fully id’ing this hand plane, I would appreciate it.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".


15 replies so far

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Arminius

304 posts in 2525 days


#1 posted 02-09-2014 04:08 PM

Defiance was Stanley’s budget quality line from the 20’s until the early 50’s when it became the Handyman line. I would guess from the stained knob/tote and the brass adjustment knob that yours is a pre-war edition. During the war the knobs became plastic, the post-war ones handle/knobs when wooden tend to be so heavily finished you cannot see the grain.

Not superb tools, but they got a lot worse in the years to come. Given that it is a jack plane, it can certainly be tuned up to perform that role.

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MikeinSC

58 posts in 710 days


#2 posted 02-09-2014 05:08 PM

Do jack planes have a number order like the smaller planes do?

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10203 posts in 1340 days


#3 posted 02-09-2014 05:19 PM

A jack is a #5 in the Stanley numbering scheme.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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MikeinSC

58 posts in 710 days


#4 posted 02-09-2014 05:38 PM

Thank you.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

View Don W's profile

Don W

15415 posts in 1289 days


#5 posted 02-09-2014 07:19 PM

The Defiance line wasn’t nearly as bad as the Handyman line. My only complaint was the lateral adjustment. I never cared for it. They could be made into decent users.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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SCOTSMAN

5529 posts in 2307 days


#6 posted 02-09-2014 08:42 PM

I figure if this is a tool gloat like many we have then it is a bit of a dud squib as fifteen bucks was enough for this old clunker in it’s present condition. IMHO Alistair p.s sorry I could not be more positive, but hey you weren’t robbed LOL

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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MikeinSC

58 posts in 710 days


#7 posted 02-10-2014 12:19 AM

It’s not so much of a gloat but rather a short story and a request for more identification.

If I were to gloat, it would be that I found a solid tool for cheap, was able to bring it back into decent shape and have used it to make my first piece of furniture with. I’ve never used a hand plane before, never restored a tool before and have never built anything before. All of which I have done in the last few days.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 614 days


#8 posted 02-10-2014 12:27 AM

Nice find. I’m hoping to have your luck this coming spring with the garage sales and all.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

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Don W

15415 posts in 1289 days


#9 posted 02-10-2014 12:56 AM

I’d say you’re off to a great start.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

10203 posts in 1340 days


#10 posted 02-10-2014 01:39 AM

My sincerest Congrats, Mike!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

205 posts in 1679 days


#11 posted 02-10-2014 02:51 AM

@ Mike -if you’re happy then well done. It cracks me up when guys carry on like they’re prospecting for gold and can retire on the earnings of their tool hunts. Seems to me that they miss the point of the concept of “hobby.” If you’re having fun and have found a tool that works then imo you’re miles ahead of the brand snobs and the guys who collect things that they’ll never use and never truly enjoy.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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TraylorPark

33 posts in 320 days


#12 posted 02-10-2014 03:39 PM

Nice find on the No. 5. However, I’m going to have to disagree with you on the No. 33 from HF. I just picked one up this weekend and turned it into a scrub plane. It took a bit of work to lap the sole then I put good camber on the iron and put it to work. I used it to rough down some 6×6 beams that somebody had taken a hatchet to in an attempt to make them look hand hewed. The 33 took out the gouges and hatchet marks then went in with a no 5 and no 7 then smoothed them up. So don’t give up on the 33 just give it a new job.

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SPHinTampa

548 posts in 2407 days


#13 posted 02-10-2014 05:26 PM

Nice job on getting the plane back into working order. Based on the project picture, I think you are doing well for a $15 flea market find. I find that the quality on a lot of the older planes, especially before the 1940’s, makes it worth doing a restore. My personal dividing line is a cast frog versus stamped metal frog (others may be more picky).

One observation that I will offer (not intended as a criticism) is that I find that using citric acid or naval jelly to rid the blade and chip breaker of rust ensures that they keep a better edge for longer. I then use steel wool and paste wax to keep the newly cleaned metal rust free for a bit longer than exposed new metal will last.

-- Shawn, I ask in order to learn

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MikeinSC

58 posts in 710 days


#14 posted 02-11-2014 05:17 AM

Thanks folks. I appreciate the feedback.

I was looking at Hock blades earlier. Are there any opinions on them?

@TraylorPark- I might give the #33 another look but mine did absolutely nothing. I did consider taking the blade to a knife sharpening professional I know but I so far can’t justify the effort for a brand new tool. However, I’ve found an older Craftsman #4 that I can justify the effort. It’s flawed reasoning I know, but…ehh.

@fuigb – I agree with you. I’d rather have a solid tool that just works than have a brand name.

@Shawn – I remember using naval jelly in my dads shop when I was a kid. I would always wonder how they got it out of belly buttons. When I do fully restore the plane, I’ll be sure to use your advice. I had only wanted to knock it back into shape and put it to work.

-- I am what they call a "rookie".

View Arminius's profile

Arminius

304 posts in 2525 days


#15 posted 02-11-2014 12:11 PM

Hock Blades are very nice – I particularly like the shape on a Bailey classic. For your jack plane, I am not sure I would go to the expense, but if you rehab a well-made old smoother definitely.

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