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need opions cutting hickorey with band saw mill

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Forum topic by jeffarchie posted 02-06-2014 07:09 PM 1872 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jeffarchie

12 posts in 1035 days


02-06-2014 07:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

i know it is a very hard wood to cut. ive been cutting this hickorey at 3/4 thicks x 8 wide and 9 ft long my first 2 logs cut fine ive put new blades on as they have become dull it was taking one blade per log. now i put a new blade on and using smaller logs ill get about 6 cuts and it starts diving has anyone had this problem if so any suggestions? thanks

-- jeff glover


31 replies so far

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#1 posted 02-06-2014 08:30 PM

Hi Jeff,
Hickory is no harder than Oak. The problem is the sugary sap in hickory tends to build up gum around the blade. I don’t have a mill but cut a lot of hickory with a chainsaw and this is what I have noticed. It gums up and crystallize on your blade. Not sure if you are using oil on the band saw, but may want try soap water instead.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#2 posted 02-06-2014 09:25 PM

Hickory is easy compared to bodock (osage orange).
When I get into wood that gums up the saw I mix kerosene with my chain oil; about 50/50.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#3 posted 02-06-2014 09:40 PM

Hickory is one of the few woods that I swore off cutting on my sawmill. Hickory is the DEVIL. I don’t want to argue with you, mrjinx007, but hickory is harder than oak, even white oak.

Hickory is THE DEVIL.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#4 posted 02-06-2014 09:45 PM

I haven’t cut hickory with my mill yet, but if its dry I can see it being a problem. I agree its a lot harder than white oak. And the bark is a killer.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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jeffarchie

12 posts in 1035 days


#5 posted 02-06-2014 09:58 PM

yes ive done quiet a bit of oak, and never have a problem i dont go thro as many blades cutting oak. im usings diesel as a lube right now. but ive read on a few other websites of people who swear by pinesol and water mixed with a lil mean green. that and tighting the heck out of the blades. but id rather not have to replace the bearings on my mill at the same time. just thought maybe somebody else has gone thro this and could point me the right way

-- jeff glover

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jeffarchie

12 posts in 1035 days


#6 posted 02-06-2014 10:00 PM

these logs i cut down about two weeks ago they are still wet

-- jeff glover

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jeffarchie

12 posts in 1035 days


#7 posted 02-06-2014 10:12 PM

but yeah WDHLT15 im seriously giving it thoughts of not doin anymore myself. not worth my time. its starting to look better as fire wood

-- jeff glover

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Don W

17966 posts in 2032 days


#8 posted 02-06-2014 10:42 PM

if its green I wouldn’t think it would be that bad, but WDHLT15 would know better than me. I’ll bet it has more to do with the bark than the wood, but, I won’t know until I try. It does make good firewood though.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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jeffarchie

12 posts in 1035 days


#9 posted 02-06-2014 11:24 PM

yeah don my first couple logs went fine had change blades bout every log. i think im gonna try the pinesol and water idea in the morning . i know hickory has a lot of stress on it but i wonder if the smaller logs has more stress than the larger logs?

-- jeff glover

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#10 posted 02-06-2014 11:51 PM

WDHLT15, I must agree with you, it is harder than red oak, white oak, maybe similar to it; but oak doesn’t have all that sugary sap hickory has. If you tap the hickory at a certain time in early spring or mid- Fall, it makes an excellent substitute for maple syrup. So does birch. Let’s hope he find a good solution to his problem. Any idea on how to keep your chain saw from clogging up with hickory sap?

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#11 posted 02-07-2014 12:02 AM

crank49, I’ll use your suggestion.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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jeffarchie

12 posts in 1035 days


#12 posted 02-07-2014 12:30 AM

yeah illl try anything i have another thousand bd ft to get done ive made it this far not gonna give up

-- jeff glover

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Randy_ATX

835 posts in 1907 days


#13 posted 02-07-2014 01:22 AM

Curious what you’re planning with the hickory lumber.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2155 days


#14 posted 02-07-2014 02:14 AM

Danny, I have cut quite a bit of standing dead pecan and it seems to cut well. Is hickory a lot harder? I’ve read the posts on the Forestry Forum about how hard hickory/pecan are to dry without warping/twisting. Does this hold true for standing dead as well as green.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#15 posted 02-07-2014 02:52 AM

gfadvm,

I have found that drying quality is directly related to log quality. Nice straight, clear logs are the key. Any sweep in hickory, and the tension in the log will be very bad. Orchard pecan trees that go up about 6 feet then branch do not dry well. I cut one pecan that was growing in the woods next to a field where the rain runoff carried fertilizer to the tree, and this one dried very nicely. It had a 16 foot straight log in the butt that was 30” in diameter. The lumber from this pecan was mostly clear. In pecan, at any big knot, the board will kink.

Here is a pic of that pecan log.

My friend Jake Dean and I cut some orchard pecan, and the results were inconsistent. Some nice straight lumber, and many that dried with kinks and crooks at the knots, even though these were large trees.

Here are some more pecan orchard logs. Nice load.

We could hardly get this one in the truck!

I have not cut dry hickory. I bet that it is tougher than wet hickory for sure. My problem with it was that I could not consistently cut straight lumber without waves. Very frustrating.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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